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Dvorák
Antonín Leopold Dvořák (/d(ə)ˈvɔːrʒɑːk, -ʒæk/ d(ə)-VOR-zha(h)k; Czech: [ˈantoɲiːn ˈlɛopolt ˈdvor̝aːk]; 8 September 1841 – 1 May 1904) was a Czech composer. After Bedřich Smetana, he was the second Czech composer to achieve major worldwide recognition. Following Smetana's nationalist example, Dvořák frequently employed aspects, specifically rhythms, of the folk music of Moravia and his native Bohemia. Dvořák's own style has been described as "the fullest recreation of a national idiom with that of the symphonic tradition, absorbing folk influences and finding effective ways of using them".[1] Dvořák displayed his musical gifts at an early age, being an apt violin student from age six. The first public performances of his works were in Prague
Prague
in 1872 and, with special success, in 1873, when he was aged 31
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Dvořák (other)
Dvořák or Dvorak
Dvorak
is a common Czech surname, originally referring to a rich landowner with a manor house (Czech dvůr, cognate with Polish dwór). It is the fourth most common surname in the Czech lands. Dvořák or Dvorak
Dvorak
may refer to:Contents1 People1.1 Dvořák or Dvorak1.1.1 Arts 1.1.2 Computing 1.1.3 Sports 1.1.4 Other1.2 Dvorakova or Dvořáková 1.3 Dvorschák 1.4 Dworschak 1.5 Dworshak2 Other usesPeople[edit] Dvořák or Dvorak[edit] Arts[edit] Ann Dvorak
Ann Dvorak
(1912–1979), American film actress (stage name) Antonín Dvořák
Antonín Dvořák
(1841–1904), Czech composer of Romantic music František Dvořák (painter), (1862-1927), Czech painter Josef Dvořák
Josef Dvořák
(born 1942), Czech actor Max Dvořák
Max Dvořák
(1874–1921), Austrian art historianComputing[edit] John C
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Zlonice
Zlonice
Zlonice
is a market town in Central Bohemian Region, Czech Republic. It is located 6 km north of Slaný
Slaný
and has a population of 2,279 (2006). Zlonice
Zlonice
Train StationSeveral valuable works of Baroque architecture
Baroque architecture
have been preserved in Zlonice, for example the Assumption church (by F.M. Kaňka) and the rectory (by K.I. Dientzenhofer). The former hospital building houses the Memorial of composer Antonín Dvořák
Antonín Dvořák
who lived in Zlonice
Zlonice
from 1853 to 1856; he nicknamed his First Symphony The Bells of Zlonice. There is also a small Railway Museum at the local train station. It was the birthplace of Wenzel Krumpholz, a mandolin and violin player, friend to Ludwig von Beethoven.[1] References[edit]^ Philip J
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String Quartet No. 12 (Dvořák)
The String Quartet in F major, Op. 96, nicknamed the American Quartet, is the 12th string quartet composed by Antonín Dvořák. It was written in 1893, during Dvořák's time in the United States. The quartet is one of the most popular in the chamber music repertoire.Contents1 Composition1.1 Negro, American or other influences2 Structure2.1 I. Allegro ma non troppo 2.2 II. Lento 2.3 III. Molto vivace 2.4 IV. Finale: vivace ma non troppo3 Performance and influence 4 Notes 5 Sources 6 External linksComposition[edit]Performance of the quartet by the Seraphina quartet (Caeli Smith and Sabrina Tabby, violins; Madeline Smith, viola; Genevieve Tabby, cello)I. Allegro ma non troppoII. LentoIII. Molto vivaceIV. Finale: vivace ma non troppoProblems playing these files? See media help.Dvořák composed the quartet in 1893 during a summer vacation from his position as director (1892–1895) of the National Conservatory in New York City
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Opera
Opera
Opera
(Italian: [ˈɔːpera]; English plural: operas; Italian plural: opere [ˈɔːpere]) is an art form in which singers and musicians perform a dramatic work combining text (libretto) and musical score, usually in a theatrical setting.[1] In traditional opera, singers do two types of singing: recitative, a speech-inflected style[2] and arias, a more melodic style, in which notes are sung in a sustained fashion. Opera
Opera
incorporates many of the elements of spoken theatre, such as acting, scenery, and costumes and sometimes includes dance
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Libretto
A libretto is the text used in, or intended for, an extended musical work such as an opera, operetta, masque, oratorio, cantata or musical. The term libretto is also sometimes used to refer to the text of major liturgical works, such as the Mass, requiem and sacred cantata, or the story line of a ballet. Libretto
Libretto
(pronounced [liˈbretto]; plural libretti [liˈbretti]), from Italian, is the diminutive of the word libro ("book"). Sometimes other language equivalents are used for libretti in that language, livret for French works and Textbuch for German. A libretto is distinct from a synopsis or scenario of the plot, in that the libretto contains all the words and stage directions, while a synopsis summarizes the plot
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Humoresques (Dvořák)
Humoresques (Czech: Humoresky), Op. 101 (B. 187), is a piano cycle by the Czech composer Antonín Dvořák, written during the summer of 1894. One writer says "the seventh Humoresque is probably the most famous small piano work ever written after Beethoven's Für Elise."[1]Contents1 History 2 Structure 3 "Passengers will please refrain..." 4 Recordings 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] During his stay in United States, when Dvořák was director of the Conservatory in New York from 1892 to 1895, the composer collected many interesting musical themes in his sketchbooks. He used some of these ideas in other compositions, notably the "New World" Symphony, the "American" String Quartet, the Quintet in E♭ Major, and the Sonatina for Violin, but some remained unused. In 1894 Dvořák spent the summer with his family in Bohemia, at Vysoká u Příbrami
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Nelahozeves
Nelahozeves
Nelahozeves
is a village on left bank of the Vltava
Vltava
river, 35 km north of Prague, Czech Republic. In 2015 its population was 1,900. History[edit] The oldest surviving written document mentioning Nelahozeves
Nelahozeves
dates to 1352. The village has a three-winged Renaissance chateau in the Italianate Northern Mannerist style, featuring elaborate sgraffito designs that depict scenes from Greek mythology and the Old Testament. The castle is an example of the castello fortezza, a design that was considered very modern in the 16th century. Its predominant characteristics are faux architectural defenses, including decorative bastions and an entry bridge without a moat. The most noteworthy of the castle’s interior rooms is the Knight’s Hall, which dates from 1564
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Austrian Empire
The Austrian Empire
Empire
(Austrian German: Kaiserthum Oesterreich, modern spelling Kaisertum Österreich) was a Central European multinational great power from 1804 to 1919 (losing Hungary
Hungary
in 1867) created by proclamation out of the realms of the Habsburgs. During its existence, it was the third most populous empire after the Russian Empire
Empire
and France
France
in Europe. Along with Prussia, it was one of the two major powers of the German Confederation. Geographically, it was the second largest empire in Europe after the Russian Empire
Empire
(621,538 square kilometres [239,977 sq mi]). Proclaimed in response to the First French Empire, it overlapped with the Holy Roman Empire
Holy Roman Empire
until the latter's dissolution in 1806
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Zither
Zither
Zither
(/ˈzɪðər, ˈzɪθ-/;[1] German: [ˈtsɪtɐ]) is a class of stringed instruments. The word Zither
Zither
is a German rendering of the Greek word cithara, from which the modern word "guitar" also derives. Historically, it has been applied to any instrument of the cittern family, or an instrument consisting of many strings stretched across a thin, flat body – similar to a psaltery. This article describes the second variety.[1][2][3] Zithers are played by strumming or plucking the strings, either with the fingers (sometimes using an accessory called a plectrum or pick), sounding the strings with a bow, or, with varieties of the instrument like the santur or cimbalom, by beating the strings with specially shaped hammers. Like a guitar or lute, a zither's body serves as a resonating chamber (sound box), but, unlike guitars and lutes, a zither lacks a distinctly separate neck assembly
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Bailiff
A bailiff (from Middle English
Middle English
baillif, Old French
Old French
baillis, bail "custody, charge, office"; cf. bail, based on the adjectival form, baiulivus, of Latin bajulus, carrier, manager) is a manager, overseer or custodian; a legal officer to whom some degree of authority or jurisdiction is given. Bailiffs are of various kinds and their offices and duties vary greatly.[1] Another official sometimes referred to as a bailiff was the vogt: see Vogt
Vogt
and Vogt
Vogt
(Switzerland)
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House Of Lobkowicz
The House of Lobkowicz
Lobkowicz
(Lobkovicové in modern Czech, sg
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German Language
No official regulation ( German orthography
German orthography
regulated by the Council for German Orthography[4]). Language
Language
codesISO 639-1 deISO 639-2 ger
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Czechs
Mostly Irreligion[13] Historically Christian Roman Catholic, Hussite, Lutheran and other Moravians, Slovaks, Silesians, Sorbs, Germans[14], Austrians[14], Bavarians, Poles
Poles
& other West SlavsThe Czechs
Czechs
(Czech: Češi, pronounced [ˈtʃɛʃɪ]; singular masculine: Čech [ˈtʃɛx], singular feminine: Češka [ˈtʃɛʃka]) or the Czech people (Český národ), are a West Slavic ethnic group and a nation native to the Czech Republic
Czech Republic
in Central Europe, who share a common ancestry, culture, history and are native speakers of the Czech language. Ethnic Czechs
Czechs
were called Bohemians in English until the early 20th century, referring to the medieval land of Bohemia
Bohemia
which in turn was adapted from late Iron Age
Iron Age
tribe of Celtic Boii
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Organ (music)
In music, the organ (from Greek ὄργανον organon, "organ, instrument, tool")[1] is a keyboard instrument of one or more pipe divisions or other means for producing tones, each played with its own keyboard, played either with the hands on a keyboard or with the feet using pedals. The organ is a relatively old musical instrument,[2] dating from the time of Ctesibius
Ctesibius
of Alexandria (285–222 BC), who invented the water organ
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Piano
The piano is an acoustic, stringed musical instrument invented in Italy
Italy
by Bartolomeo Cristofori
Bartolomeo Cristofori
around the year 1700 (the exact year is uncertain), in which the strings are struck by hammers. It is played using a keyboard,[1] which is a row of keys (small levers) that the performer presses down or strikes with the fingers and thumbs of both hands to cause the hammers to strike the strings. The word piano is a shortened form of pianoforte, the Italian term for the early 1700s versions of the instrument, which in turn derives from gravicembalo col piano e forte[2] and fortepiano
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