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Duqaq
Abu Nasr Shams al-Muluk Duqaq (died June 8, 1104) was the Seljuq ruler of Damascus
Damascus
from 1095 to 1104. Reign[edit] Duqaq was a son of the Seljuq ruler of Syria, Tutush I, and Khatun Safwat al-Mulk, He was the brother of Radwan. When their father died in 1095, Radwan claimed Syria
Syria
for himself, and Duqaq initially inherited territory in the Jezirah and lived with his brother in Aleppo. However, he soon rebelled and seized control of Damascus, throwing Syria
Syria
into near anarchy and civil war. Duqaq had the support of Yaghi-Siyan of Antioch, who had no quarrel with Radwan but disliked Radwan's atabeg Janah ad-Dawla; joining Yaghi-Siyan and Duqaq was Ilghazi, governor of Jerusalem
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Godfrey Of Bouillon
Godfrey of Bouillon
Bouillon
(French: Godefroy de Bouillon, Dutch: Godfried van Bouillon, German: Gottfried von Bouillon, Latin: Godefridus Bullionensis; 18 September 1060 – 18 July 1100) was a Frankish knight and one of the leaders of the First Crusade
First Crusade
from 1096 until its conclusion in 1099. He was the Lord of Bouillon, from which he took his byname, from 1076 and the Duke of Lower Lorraine
Duke of Lower Lorraine
from 1087. After the successful siege of Jerusalem
Jerusalem
in 1099, Godfrey became the first ruler of the Kingdom of Jerusalem. He refused the title of King, however, as he believed that the true King of Jerusalem
King of Jerusalem
was Christ, preferring the title of Advocate (i.e., protector or defender) of the Holy Sepulchre
Holy Sepulchre
(Latin: Advocatus Sancti Sepulchri)
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Sökmen Of Artukids
Sökmen is a Turkish given name or surname. Notable persons with that name include: Sökmen (Artuqid) (died 1104), Turkish bey Sökmen el-Kutbî (died 1111), Turkish bey Sökmen II (died 1185), Turkish ruler Ayhan Sökmen (1929–2013), Turkish physician Tayfur Sökmen
Tayfur Sökmen
(1892–1980), Turkish politicianThis page lists people with the surname Sökmen
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Ibn Al-Qalanisi
Hamza ibn Asad abu Ya'la ibn al-Qalanisi (Arabic: ابن القلانسي‎) (c. 1071 – March 18, 1160) was an Arab politician and chronicler in Damascus
Damascus
in the 12th century. He descended from the Banu Tamim tribe, and was among the well-educated nobility of the city of Damascus. He studied literature, theology, and law, and served as firstly a secretary in, and later the head of, the chancery of Damascus
Damascus
(the Diwan al-Rasa'il). He served twice as ra'is of the city, an office equivalent to mayor. His chronicle, the Dhail or Mudhayyal Ta'rikh Dimashq (Continuation of the Chronicle of Damascus) was an extension of the chronicle of Hilal bin al-Muhassin al-Sabi', covering the years 1056 to al-Qalanisi's death in 1160
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Assassination
Note: Varies by jurisdictionAssassination Cannibalism Child murder Consensual homicide Contract killing Crime of passion Depraved-heart murder Execution-style murder Felony murder rule Feticide Honor killing Human sacrifice InfanticideChild sacrificeInternet homicide Lonely hearts killer Lust murder Lynching Mass murder Mass shooting Misdemeanor murder Murder–suicide Poisoning Proxy murder Pseudocommando Serial killer Spree killer Thrill killing Torture murder Vehicle-ramming attackManslaughterIn English law Voluntary manslaughter Negligent homicide Vehicular homicideNon-criminal homicideNote: Varies by jurisdictionAssisted suicide Capital punishment Euthanasia Feticide Justifiable homicide WarBy victim or victimsSuicideFamily Avunculicide (Nepoticide) Familicide M
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Beirut
Coordinates: 33°53′13″N 35°30′47″E / 33.88694°N 35.51306°E / 33.88694; 35.51306Beirut بيروت BeyrouthCity Beirut
Beirut
city skyline in the early 2000sFlagSealNickname(s): Paris of the East[1]Motto(s): Beirut, mother of laws (Latin: Berytus
Berytus
Nutrix Legum)BeirutLocation of Beirut
Beirut
within LebanonCoordinates: 33°53′13″N 35°30′47″E / 33.88694°N 35.51306°E / 33.88694; 35.51306Country  LebanonGovernorate BeirutGovernment • Mayor Jamal ItaniArea • City 19.8 km2 (7.6 sq mi) • Metro 67 km2 (26 sq mi)Population (2014) • City c. 361,366 [2] • Metro c
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Diyarbakr
Diyarbakır (Kurdish: Amed)[3][4][5] is one of the largest cities in southeastern Turkey. Situated on the banks of the Tigris River, it is the administrative capital of the Diyarbakır Province
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Mosul
Mosul
Mosul
(Arabic: الموصل‎ al-Mawṣil, Kurdish: مووسڵ‎, Syriac: ܡܘܨܠ‎, translit. Māwṣil) is a major city in northern Iraq. Located some 400 km (250 mi) north of Baghdad, Mosul
Mosul
stands on the west bank of the Tigris, opposite the ancient Assyrian city of Nineveh
Nineveh
on the east bank. The metropolitan area has grown to encompass substantial areas on both the "Left Bank" (east side) and the "Right Bank" (west side), as the two banks are described by the locals compared to the flow direction of Tigris. At the start of the 21st century, Mosul
Mosul
and its surrounds had an ethnically and religiously diverse population; the majority of Mosul's population were Arabs, with Assyrians,[4][5][6] Armenians, Turkmens, Kurds, Yazidis, Shabakis, Mandaeans, Kawliya, Circassians
Circassians
in addition to other, smaller ethnic minorities
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Kerbogha
Kerbogha (Arabic: كربغا‎, Turkish: Kürboğa) was Atabeg of Mosul
Mosul
during the First Crusade
First Crusade
and was renowned as a soldier. [1]Contents1 Early Life 2 The First Crusade 3 See also 4 ReferencesEarly Life[edit] Kerbogha was a Turk who owed his success to his military talent.[2] In 1095 he served under the Abbasid Caliph
Caliph
Al-Mustazhir in his attempted reconquest of Aleppo. The First Crusade[edit] In 1098, when he heard that the Crusaders had besieged Antioch, he gathered his troops and marched to relieve the city. On his way, he attempted to regain Edessa
Edessa
following its recent conquest by Baldwin I, so as not to leave any Frankish garrisons behind him on his way to Antioch.[3] For three weeks he pointlessly besieged the city before deciding to continue on to Antioch
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Bohemund I Of Antioch
Bohemond I (c. 1054 – 3 March 1111) was the Prince of Taranto from 1089 to 1111 and the Prince of Antioch from 1098 to 1111
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Shaizar
Shaizar (Arabic: شيزر‎; also called Saijar or Larissa in Syria) is a town in northern Syria, administratively part of the Hama Governorate, located northwest of Hama. Nearby localities include, Mahardah, Tremseh, Kafr Hud, Khunayzir and Halfaya. According to the Syria Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS), Shaizar had a population of 5,953 in the 2004 census.[1] During the Crusades, the town was a fortress in Syria, ruled by the Banu Munqidh family. It played an important part in the Christian and Muslim politics of the crusades.Contents1 Early history 2 Munqidhite Shaizar 3 Usama ibn Munqidh 4 Description of the city4.1 Life in the city5 Emirs of Shaizar 6 See also 7 References 8 Sources 9 External linksEarly history[edit]The fortress of ShaizarLocated on the Orontes to the northwest of Hama, Shaizar was an ancient town, known as Senzar or Sezar in the Amarna letters
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Homs
Homs
Homs
(/hɔːms/;[2] Arabic: حمص‎ / ALA-LC: Ḥimṣ), previously known as Emesa
Emesa
or Emisa (Greek: Ἔμεσα Emesa),[3] is a city in western Syria
Syria
and the capital of the Homs
Homs
Governorate. It is 501 metres (1,644 ft) above sea level and is located 162 kilometres (101 mi) north of Damascus.[4] Located on the Orontes River, Homs is also the central link between the interior cities and the Mediterranean coast. Before the Syrian civil war, Homs
Homs
was a major industrial centre, and with a population of at least 652,609 people in 2004,[5] it was the third largest city in Syria
Syria
after Aleppo
Aleppo
to the north and the capital Damascus
Damascus
to the south
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Crusade
After 1291Smyrniote 1343–1351 Alexandrian 1365 Savoyard 1366 Barbary 1390 Nicopolis 1396 Varna
Varna
1443 Portuguese 1481 Northern Crusades
Northern Crusades
(1147–1410)Wendish 1147 Swedish1150 1249 1293Livonian 1198–1290 Prussian 1217–1274 Lithuan
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Jerusalem
Jerusalem
Jerusalem
(/dʒəˈruːsələm/; Hebrew: יְרוּשָׁלַיִם‬  Yerushaláyim; Arabic: القُدس‎  al-Quds)[note 2] is a city in the Middle East, located on a plateau in the Judaean Mountains between the Mediterranean and the Dead Sea. It is one of the oldest cities in the world, and is considered holy to the three major Abrahamic religions—Judaism, Christianity
Christianity
and Islam
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Atabeg
Atabeg, Atabek, or Atabey is a hereditary title of nobility of a Turkic origin,[1] indicating a governor of a nation or province who was subordinate to a monarch and charged with raising the crown prince
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Antioch
Antioch
Antioch
on the Orontes (/ˈæntiˌɒk/; Greek: Ἀντιόχεια ἡ ἐπὶ Ὀρόντου, also Syrian Antioch)[note 1] was an ancient Greco-Roman
Greco-Roman
city[1] on the eastern side of the Orontes River. Its ruins lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey, and lends the modern city its name. Antioch
Antioch
was founded near the end of the 4th century
4th century
BC by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals. The city's geographical, military, and economic location benefited its occupants, particularly such features as the spice trade, the Silk Road, and the Persian Royal Road. It eventually rivaled Alexandria
Alexandria
as the chief city of the Near East. It was also the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple
Second Temple
period
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