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Dummer's War
The Dummer's War
Dummer's War
(1722–1725, also known as Father Rale's War, Lovewell's War, Greylock's War, the Three Years War, the 4th Anglo- Abenaki
Abenaki
War,[3] or the Wabanaki- New England
New England
War of 1722–1725)[4] was a series of battles between New England
New England
and the Wabanaki Confederacy
Wabanaki Confederacy
(specifically the Mi'kmaq, Maliseet, and Abenaki) who were allied with New France. The eastern theater of the war was fought primarily along the border between New England
New England
and Acadia
Acadia
in Maine, as well as in Nova Scotia; the western theater was fought in northern Massachusetts and Vermont
Vermont
at the border between Canada (New France) and New England
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Siege Of Port Royal (1710)
 Great BritainIroquois FranceWabanaki Confederacy Mi'kmaq AbenakiCommanders and leadersFrancis Nicholson Shadrach Walton Cyprian Southack Daniel d'Auger de Subercase Simon-Pierre Denys de BonaventureStrengthabout 2,000 regular and provincial soldiers[2][3] fewer than 300[2]Casualties and lossesunknown unknownv t eWar of the Spanish Succession: North AmericaQuebec and Newfoundland:Newfoundland 1st St. John's 2nd St. John's Fort Albany Quebec Acadia
Acadia
and New England:1st Northeast 
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Jeremiah Moulton
Jeremiah Moulton
Jeremiah Moulton
(b. York, Massachusetts (now in York, Maine), 1688, d. York, 20 July 1765) was a New England militia officer and member of the Massachusetts Council. As a boy, during King William's War, Moulton's parents were killed and he was taken captive in the Raid on York (1692). He was eventually released and served in Father Rale's War
Father Rale's War
at Fort Richmond (Maine). Between 1721 and 1724 there were four attempts to capture the missionary Father Sebastian Rale; Captain Jeremiah Moulton
Jeremiah Moulton
played a prominent role in at least two of these, including the last, which succeeded, which is known as Battle of Norridgewock. After this attack, Captain Moulton continued to take part in scouting expeditions. When the war was over, he remained a militia officer, but resumed his civil career
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Treaty Of Utrecht
The Treaty of Utrecht, which established the Peace of Utrecht, is a series of individual peace treaties, rather than a single document, signed by the belligerents in the War of the Spanish Succession, in the Dutch city of Utrecht
Utrecht
in March and April 1713. Before Charles II of Spain died in 1700, having no Hapsburg heirs, he had named Philip, the Duke of Anjou, a French Bourbon, as his successor. Philip was the grandson of Charles' half-sister, Maria Theresa of Spain
Maria Theresa of Spain
and Louis XIV of France. However, Philip was also in line for the French throne, and the other major powers (countries) in Europe were not willing to tolerate the potential union of two such powerful states
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Cape Breton
Cape Breton Island
Cape Breton Island
(French: île du Cap-Breton—formerly Île Royale; Scottish Gaelic: Ceap Breatainn or Eilean Cheap Bhreatainn; Mi'kmaq: Unama'kik; or simply Cape Breton) is an island on the Atlantic coast of North America
North America
and part of the province of Nova Scotia, Canada.[4] Its name may derive from Capbreton
Capbreton
near Bayonne, or more probably from the word Breton, the French demonym for Bretagne, the French historical region.[4] The 10,311 km2 (3,981 sq mi) island accounts for 18.7% of Nova Scotia's total area. Although the island is physically separated from the Nova Scotia
Nova Scotia
peninsula by the Strait of Canso, the 1,385 m (4,544 ft) long rock-fill Canso Causeway
Canso Causeway
connects it to mainland Nova Scotia
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Canada (New France)
Canada
Canada
was a French colony within New France
New France
first claimed in the name of the King of France in 1535 during the second voyage of Jacques Cartier.[1][2][3][4] The word "Canada" at this point referred to the territory along the Saint Lawrence River,[5] then known as the Canada river, from Grosse Island in the east to a point between Quebec
Quebec
and Three Rivers,[6] although this territory had greatly expanded by 1600. French explorations continued "unto the Countreys of Canada, Hochelaga, and Saguenay"[7] before any permanent settlements were established
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New Brunswick
New Brunswick (French: Nouveau-Brunswick; Canadian French pronunciation: [nuvobʁɔnzwɪk] ( listen)) is one of three Maritime provinces on the east coast of Canada. The original inhabitants of the land were the Mi'kmaq, the Maliseet, and the Passamaquoddy peoples. Being relatively close to Europe, New Brunswick was among the first places in North America to be explored and settled, starting with the French in the early 1600s, who eventually colonized most of the Maritimes and some of Maine as the colony of Acadia. The area was caught up in the global conflict between the British and French empires, and in 1755 became part of Nova Scotia, to be partitioned off in 1784 following an influx of refugees from the American Revolutionary War. In 1785, Saint John became the first incorporated city in Canada. The same year, the University of New Brunswick became one of the first universities in North America
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New France
New France
France
(French: Nouvelle-France) was the area colonized by France in North America
North America
during a period beginning with the exploration of the
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Norridgewock
93000606 [1]Significant datesAdded to NRHP April 12, 1993Designated NHLD April 12, 1993[2] Norridgewock
Norridgewock
was the name of both an Indian village and a band of the Abenaki
Abenaki
("People of the Dawn") Native Americans/First Nations, an Eastern Algonquian tribe of the United States
United States
and Canada. The French of New France
New France
called the village Kennebec. The tribe occupied an area in the interior of Maine. During colonial times, this area was territory disputed between British and French colonists, and was set along the claimed western border of Acadia, the western bank of the Kennebec River. Archaeological evidence has identified several different sites associated with the settlement known as Norridgewock
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Northeast Coast Campaign (1724)
The Northeast Coast Campaign (1724) occurred during Father Rale's War from March 1724 – September 1724.[1] The Wabanaki Confederacy of Acadia attacked the coast of present-day Maine that was below the Kennebec River, the border of Acadia and New England. They attacked English settlements on the coast of present-day Maine between Berwick and Mount Desert Island. Casco (also known as Falmouth and Portland) was the principal settlement. The 1723 campaign was so successful along the Maine frontier that Dummer ordered its evacuation to the blockhouses in the spring of 1724.[2] In March and April they killed 30 British settlers. The most significant battle was between Captain Josiah Winslow (older brother of John Winslow) who was stationed Fort St. George. He with 16 troops were going down river in two whale boats when they were ambushed by the Tarrantines (Mi'kmaq). They killed all but three, including Josiah Winslow
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Northeast Coast Campaign (1723)
The Northeast Coast Campaign (1723) occurred during Father Rale's War from April 19, 1723 – January 28, 1724. In response to the previous year, in which New England
England
attacked the Wabanaki Confederacy
Wabanaki Confederacy
at Norridgewock
Norridgewock
and Penobscot, the Wabanaki Confederacy
Wabanaki Confederacy
retaliated by attacking the coast of present-day Maine
Maine
that was below the Kennebec River, the border of Acadia. They attacked English settlements on the coast of present-day Maine
Maine
between Berwick and Mount Desert Island. Casco (also known as Falmouth and Portland) was the principal settlement
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Penobscot River
The Penobscot River
Penobscot River
/pəˈnɒbskət/ is a 109-mile-long (175 km)[2] river in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Maine. Including the river's West Branch and South Branch increases the Penobscot's length to 264 miles (425 km),[2] making it the second longest river system in Maine
Maine
and the longest entirely in the state. Its drainage basin contains 8,610 square miles (22,300 km2). It arises from four branches in several lakes in north-central Maine, which flow generally east. After the uniting of the West Branch with the East Branch at Medway (45°36′14″N 68°31′52″W / 45.604°N 68.531°W / 45.604; -68.531 (Penobscot River source)), the Penobscot flows 109 miles (175 km) south, past the city of Bangor, where it becomes navigable. Also at Bangor is the tributary Kenduskeag Stream. It empties into the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
in Penobscot Bay
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Chief Mog
Mog (1663-1724), also called "Chief" Mog, Heracouansit, Warracansit, Warracunsit, or Warrawcuset, was an Abenaki Native American war leader who fought the British in North America during the early 18th century. Biography[edit] Mog was the son of Mog, a previous leader of the Abenaki, who was killed in 1677. Mog fought in King William's War
King William's War
and Queen Anne's War as an ally of New France, returning British scalps to Quebec in exchange for payment. After the Treaty of Utrecht, Mog was forced to capitulate, giving the British free passage through their territory. Peace was ended in 1722 when a few Abenaki males attacked Massachusetts, and the Colony of Massachusetts
Colony of Massachusetts
declared war on the Abenaki
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Chief Paugus
Paugus was chief of the Pequawket
Pequawket
tribe which lived along the Saco River in present-day Conway, New Hampshire, and Fryeburg, Maine. He was killed at the Battle of Pequawket
Pequawket
in 1725 during Father Rale's War.Contents1 Etymology and spelling 2 Legacy and honors 3 See also 4 ReferencesEtymology and spelling[edit] His name translates into English as "The Oak". Legacy and honors[edit] Paugus Bay was named for him.See also[edit]Battle of PequawketReferences[edit]Evans, George Hill (1939). Pigwacket. Conway, NH: Conway, NH Historical Society
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Joseph Aubery
Joseph Aubery (born at Gisors
Gisors
in Normandy, 10 May 1673; died at Saint-François, Quebec, Canada, 2 July 1755 was a French Jesuit missionary in Canada. Chateaubriand
Chateaubriand
reproduces the life-story of Father Aubery in the character of the missionary in his Atala.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 References 4 SourcesLife[edit] Joseph Aubery was born 10 May 1673 at Gisors
Gisors
in Normandy. At the age of seventeen he entered the Society of Jesus, and for four years studied in Paris. He arrived in Canada in 1694 and completed his studies at Quebec
Quebec
where he was also instructor for five years, and where he was ordained in September 1699.[1] He studied the Abenaki language at the Sault de la Chaudière mission
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Penobscot Indian Island Reservation
Penobscot Indian Island Reservation
Penobscot Indian Island Reservation
is an Indian reservation
Indian reservation
for the Penobscot Tribe of Maine, a federally recognized tribe of the Penobscot[1] in Penobscot County, Maine, United States, near Old Town. The population was 610 at the 2010 census.[2] The reservation extends for many miles alongside 15 towns and two unorganized territories in a thin string along the Penobscot River, from its base at Indian Island, near Old Town and Milford, northward to the vicinity of East Millinocket, almost entirely in Penobscot County
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