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Dumat Al-Jandal
Dumat al-Jundal (Arabic: دومة الجندل‎) is an ancient city of ruins located in North Western Saudi Arabia
Saudi Arabia
in the Al Jawf Province; it is located 37 km away from Sakakah. The name Dumat al-Jandal means literally "Dumah of the Stone", since this was the territory of Dumah, one of the twelve sons of Ishmael. The city's ancient Akkadian name was Adummatu.Contents1 Pre-Islamic History 2 During Muhammad's era 3 Omar Bin Al Khattab Mosque 4 Al Dar'i Quarter 5 Climate 6 See also 7 External links 8 ReferencesPre-Islamic History[edit] The city has a history dating back to the 10th century BC and is mentioned in Akkadian inscriptions of the Assyrian empire
Assyrian empire
dating to 845 BC in which it is referred to as Adummatu and is described as the capital of an Arab
Arab
kingdom, sometimes named as Qedar
Qedar
(Qidri)
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Conquest Of Fadak
The Surrender of Fadak, also spelt Fidak,[1][2][3] or Fidk took place in May 628AD, 2nd month of 7AH of the Islamic calendar.[4][5] The Prophet Mohammed
Mohammed
had found out that the People of Fadak
Fadak
had collected in order to fight the Muslims alongside the Khaybar
Khaybar
Jews. Therefore, he sent Ali
Ali
to them.[6] The people of Fadak
Fadak
surrendered without a fight, and pleaded for a peace treaty in exchange for giving away half their land and wealth to Mohammed.[7] Fadak
Fadak
became Mohammad’s private property (a Fai), as there was no Muslim fighters involved in Fadak
Fadak
to share the booty with
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Invasion Of Buhran
The Invasion of Buhran occurred in 3 A.H of the Islamic calendar of the 4th or 5th month.[1] A report had arrived to the Muslims that a formidable force of the Banu Sulaym from Buhran were advancing on Madinah.[2] Muhammad, took 300 men, to Hijaz reaching to Buhran, where the Banu Sulaym fled in panic.[2] Throughout the expedition, they did not meet any enemies, and no fighting took place. The expedition is regarded as a "patrolling invasion", according to Muslim
Muslim
scholar Saifur Rahman al-Mubarakpuri.[3] This event is mentioned in Ibn Hisham's biography of Muhammad and modern Islamic sources such as Ar-Raheeq Al-Makhtum by Saifur Rahman Al-Mubarakpuri.[4] See also[edit]List of expeditions of MuhammadNotes[edit]^ Hawarey, Dr. Mosab (2010). The Journey of Prophecy; Days of Peace and War (Arabic)
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Patrol Of Waddan
A patrol is commonly a group of personnel, such as law enforcement officers or military personnel, that are assigned to monitor a specific geographic area. This is also often referred to as a beat. History Law enforcement
Law enforcement
has learned many things from the past on how to patrol effectively and efficiently. For example, the Kansas City Preventive Patrol
Patrol
Experiment found that no matter how big the police presence crime will not change.[1] In 1972, the Kansas City Police Department held an experiment to find how police presence effects the general public.[2] The Police department was sent out in 15 patrol beats around the city
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Patrol Of Buwat
The Patrol of Buwat[3] took place in October 623 or 2 A.H. of the Islamic calendar, in the month of Rabi' al-Awwal. Muhammad
Muhammad
went with a force of 200 men in order to raid parties of the Quraysh.[3] Muhammad stayed at Buwat for some time and left without engaging in combat.[3] Background and raid[edit] Approximately a month after the patrol of Wadden, Muhammad
Muhammad
personally led two hundred men including Muhajirs and Ansars to Bawat, a place on the caravan route of the Quraysh
Quraysh
raiders led by Umayyah ibn Khalaf.[3][4][5] Ibn Khalaf was believed to have tortured a Muslim named Bilal Ibn Rabah
Bilal Ibn Rabah
and had strongly opposed Islam.[6] However, no battle took place.[3] According to Haykal, Umayyah ibn Khalaf took another route.[5] Muhammad
Muhammad
then went up to Dhat al-Saq in the desert of al-Khabar
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First Expedition To Badr
The First Expedition to Badr[1] or the Preliminary Badr Invasion[2] occurred in the year 2 AH of the Islamic calendar, in the month of Rabi ul Awal
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Invasion Of Dul Ashir
An invasion is a military offensive in which large parts of combatants of one geopolitical entity aggressively enter territory controlled by another such entity, generally with the objective of either conquering; liberating or re-establishing control or authority over a territory; forcing the partition of a country; altering the established government or gaining concessions from said government; or a combination thereof. An invasion can be the cause of a war, be a part of a larger strategy to end a war, or it can constitute an entire war in itself
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Battle Of Badr
The Battle of Badr
Battle of Badr
(Arabic: غزوة بدر‎), fought on Tuesday, 13 March 624 CE (17 Ramadan, 2 AH in the Islamic calendar) in the Hejaz region of western Arabia
Arabia
(present-day Saudi Arabia), was a key battle in the early days of Islam
Islam
and a turning point in Muhammad's struggle with his opponents among the Quraish[1] in Mecca. The battle has been passed down in Islamic history as a decisive victory attributable to divine intervention, or by secular sources to the strategic genius of Muhammad. It is one of the few battles specifically mentioned in the Quran. All knowledge of the battle at Badr comes from traditional Islamic accounts, both hadiths and biographies of Muhammad, recorded in written form some time after the battle. There is little evidence outside of these of the battle
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Al Kudr Invasion
Muslim victory: Banu Salim tribe members all flee 500 camels of the Banu Salim, taken by Muhammad
Muhammad
as war booty [1]BelligerentsMuslims Banu Salim tribeCommanders and leadersMuhammad[1] NoneStrengthUnknown Unknownv t eCampaigns of MuhammadGhazwah (expeditions where he took part)Abwa Buwat Safwan Dul 1st Badr Kudr Sawiq Qaynuqa Thi Bahran Uhud Asad Nadir 2nd Nejd 2nd Badr Jandal Trench Qurayza Lahyan Mustaliq Treaty Khaybar Fadak Qura Dhat Baqra Mecca Hunayn Autas Ta'if TaboukThe expedition against the Banu Salim tribe, also known as the Al Kudr Invasion,[2] occurred directly after the Battle of Badr
Battle of Badr
in the year 2 A.H of the Islamic calendar. The expedition was ordered by Muhammad after he received intelligence that the Banu Salim were planning to invade Madina.[1] This was Muhammad's first interaction with the people of Bahrain
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Invasion Of Sawiq
The Invasion of Sawiq[1] occurred after the Quraysh's defeat in the Battle of Badr. After suffering the ignominious defeat at the Battle of Badr, Abu Sufyan
Abu Sufyan
ibn Harb, the Quraysh leader, vowed that he would not bathe until he avenges his defeat. Abu Sufyan
Abu Sufyan
gathered two hundred mounted men, took the eastern road through the Nejd and secretly arrived by night, at the settlement of Banu Nadir, a Jewish tribe. However, the Jewish chief, Huwey refused him admission to the Jewish quarters (reportedly out of fear). Abu Sufyan
Abu Sufyan
along with another leader of the Banu Nadir
Banu Nadir
tribe of Jews, Sallam ibn Mishkam, conspired to attack Madinah
Madinah
but they were unsuccessful.[2] Abu Sufyan
Abu Sufyan
took refuge with Sallam bin Mishkan
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Invasion Of Banu Qaynuqa
According to Islamic tradition, the invasion of Banu Qaynuqa,[4] also known as the expedition against Banu Qaynuqa,[5] occurred in 624 AD. The Banu Qaynuqa were a Jewish tribe expelled by the Islamic prophet Muhammad
Muhammad
for breaking the treaty known as the Constitution of Medina[2][3]:209 by pinning the clothes of a Muslim woman such that when she tried to move, her clothes tore and she was stripped naked. A Muslim killed a Jew in retaliation, and the Jews in turn killed the Muslim man
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Invasion Of Dhi Amr
Muslim victory Muhammad
Muhammad
sends 450 men after the Banu Thalabah and Banu Muharib tribes Tribe members flee into mountains [1]Belligerents
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Battle Of Uhud
Stalemate[2][3][4] Muslims
Muslims
receive significant losses, however the Meccans (Makkans) fail to take Medina
Medina
(Madīnah).Belligerents
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Invasion Of Hamra Al-Asad
Muslim
Muslim
victory ( Muhammad
Muhammad
prevents final attack) Muhammad
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Invasion Of Banu Nadir
An invasion is a military offensive in which large parts of combatants of one geopolitical entity aggressively enter territory controlled by another such entity, generally with the objective of either conquering; liberating or re-establishing control or authority over a territory; forcing the partition of a country; altering the established government or gaining concessions from said government; or a combination thereof. An invasion can be the cause of a war, be a part of a larger strategy to end a war, or it can constitute an entire war in itself
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