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Dukhan Language
The Dukha
Dukha
or Dukhan language is an endangered Turkic variety spoken by approximately five hundred people of the Dukhan (a.k.a. Tsaatan) people in the Tsagaan-Nuur county of Khövsgöl Province
Khövsgöl Province
in northern Mongolia. Dukhan belongs to the Taiga subgroup of Sayan Turkic (which also includes Tuvan and Tofa).[1] This language is nearly extinct and secondary use only. The ISO 639-3 proposal (request) code was dkh,[2] but was rejected.[3] It is mostly related to the speech of Soyot
Soyot
of Buryatia.[4] Also, it is related to the speech of Tozhu Tuvans
Tozhu Tuvans
and Tofa language
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Mongolia
Mongolia
Mongolia
/mɒŋˈɡoʊliə/ ( listen) (Monggol Ulus in Mongolian; Монгол Улс in Mongolian Cyrillic) is a landlocked unitary sovereign state in East Asia. Its area is roughly equivalent with the historical territory of Outer Mongolia, and that term is sometimes used to refer to the current state. It is sandwiched between China
China
to the south and Russia
Russia
to the north. Mongolia
Mongolia
does not share a border with Kazakhstan, although only 37 kilometres (23 mi) separates them. At 1,564,116 square kilometres (603,909 sq mi), Mongolia
Mongolia
is the 18th largest and the most sparsely populated fully sovereign country in the world, with a population of around 3 million people
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Soyot
The Soyot
Soyot
people live mainly in the Oka region in the Okinsky District in the Republic of Buryatia, Russia. According to the 2010 census, there were 3,608 Soyots in Russia. Their extinct language was of a Turkic type and basically similar to the Tuvans. Their language has been reconstructed and a textbook has been published. The language is currently taught in some schools in Oka
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Russian Language
Russian (Russian: ру́сский язы́к, tr. rússkiy yazýk) is an East Slavic language
East Slavic language
and an official language in Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan
Kyrgyzstan
and many minor or unrecognised territories throughout Eurasia
Eurasia
(particularly in Eastern Europe, the Baltics, the Caucasus, and Central Asia). It is an unofficial but widely spoken language in Latvia, Moldova, Ukraine
Ukraine
and to a lesser extent, the other post-Soviet states.[31][32] Russian belongs to the family of Indo-European languages
Indo-European languages
and is one of the four living members of the East Slavic languages
Slavic languages
(which in turn is part of the larger Balto-Slavic branch)
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Evenki Language
Evenki /eɪˈvɛnki/,[4] formerly known as Tungus[5] or Solon, is the largest member of the northern group of Tungusic languages, a group which also includes Even, Negidal, and (the more closely related) Oroqen language. The name is sometimes wrongly given as "Evenks". It is spoken by Evenks
Evenks
in Russia
Russia
and China. In certain areas the influences of the Yakut and the Buryat languages are particularly strong. The influence of Russian in general is overwhelming (in 1979, 75.2% of the Evenkis spoke Russian, rising to 92.7% in 2002). Evenki children were forced to learn Russian at Soviet residential schools, and returned with a," poor ability to speak their mother tongue...".[6] The Evenki language varies considerably among its dialects which are divided into three large groups: the northern, the southern and the eastern dialects. These are further divided into minor dialects
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Languages Of Mongolia
Mongolia
Mongolia
/mɒŋˈɡoʊliə/ ( listen) (Monggol Ulus in Mongolian; Монгол Улс in Mongolian Cyrillic) is a landlocked unitary sovereign state in East Asia. Its area is roughly equivalent with the historical territory of Outer Mongolia, and that term is sometimes used to refer to the current state. It is sandwiched between China
China
to the south and Russia
Russia
to the north. Mongolia
Mongolia
does not share a border with Kazakhstan, although only 37 kilometres (23 mi) separates them. At 1,564,116 square kilometres (603,909 sq mi), Mongolia
Mongolia
is the 18th largest and the most sparsely populated fully sovereign country in the world, with a population of around 3 million people
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Khövsgöl Province
Khövsgöl (Mongolian: Хөвсгөл) is the northernmost of the 21 aimags (provinces) of Mongolia. The name is derived from Lake Khövsgöl.Contents1 Geography and History 2 Population2.1 Famous Khövsgölians3 Livestock 4 Transportation 5 Administrative Subdivisions 6 Notes and references 7 External linksGeography and History[edit]Lake KhövsgölThe Aimag is largely mountainous. The south and southwest are dominated by the round-topped Tarvagatai, Bulnain and Erchim sub-ranges of the Khangai massif. The areas west and north of Lake Khövsgöl are formed by the alpine Khoridol Saridag, Ulaan Taiga, and Mönkh Saridag
Mönkh Saridag
mountains. The center and east are less mountainous, but still hilly. Within Mongolia, the region is well known for its natural environment,[citation needed] and Lake Khövsgöl
Lake Khövsgöl
is one of the country's major tourist attractions
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Buryatia
The Republic of Buryatia
Republic of Buryatia
(Russian: Респу́блика Буря́тия, tr. Respublika Buryatiya, IPA: [rʲɪsˈpublʲɪkə bʊˈrʲætʲɪjə]; Buryat: Буряад Улас, Buryaad Ulas, [bʊrˈjaːt ʊˈlas]) is a federal subject of Russia
Russia
(a republic), located in Asia
Asia
in Siberia. Its capital is the city of Ulan-Ude
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Tozhu Tuvans
The Tozhu Tuvans, Tozhu Tuvinians, Todzhan Tuvans
Tuvans
or Todzhinians (own name: Тугалар Tugalar or Тухалар Tukhalar; Russian Тувинцы-тоджинцы Tuvincy-todžincy, Тоджинцы Todžincy) are a Turkic subgroup of the Tuvans
Tuvans
living in Todzhinsky District of Tuva Republic. The Tozhu Tuvans
Tuvans
are reindeer herders.[3] Language[edit] The language of Tozhu Tuvan people is a subdialect of Eastern (or Northeastern) dialect of Tuvan language. References[edit]^ "Всероссийская перепись населения 2002 года". Archived from the original on 2011-08-21. Retrieved 2009-12-24.  ^ Russian Census 2010: Population by ethnicity (in Russian) ^ http://www.severcom.ru/nations/item32.html Информация о тоджинцах на сайте Совета Федерации РФBibliography[edit]Chadamba, Z. B
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Glottolog
Glottolog
Glottolog
is a bibliographic database of the world's lesser-known languages, developed and maintained first at the former Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, and since 2015 at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena, Germany. Glottolog
Glottolog
provides a catalogue of the world's languages and language families, and a bibliography on the world's less-spoken languages
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ISO 639-3
ISO 639-3:2007, Codes for the representation of names of languages – Part 3: Alpha-3 code for comprehensive coverage of languages, is an international standard for language codes in the ISO 639 series. It defines three-letter codes for identifying languages. The standard was published by ISO on 1 February 2007.[1] ISO 639-3 extends the ISO 639-2 alpha-3 codes with an aim to cover all known natural languages
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Siberian Turkic Languages
Language
Language
is a system that consists of the development, acquisition, maintenance and use of complex systems of communication, particularly the human ability to do so; and a language is any specific example of such a system. The scientific study of language is called linguistics. Questions concerning the philosophy of language, such as whether words can represent experience, have been debated at least since Gorgias
Gorgias
and Plato
Plato
in ancient Greece. Thinkers such as Rousseau
Rousseau
have argued that language originated from emotions while others like Kant have held that it originated from rational and logical thought. 20th-century philosophers such as Wittgenstein argued that philosophy is really the study of language. Major figures in linguistics include Ferdinand de Saussure and Noam Chomsky. Estimates of the number of human languages in the world vary between 5,000 and 7,000
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Language Family
A language family is a group of languages related through descent from a common ancestral language or parental language, called the proto-language of that family. The term "family" reflects the tree model of language origination in historical linguistics, which makes use of a metaphor comparing languages to people in a biological family tree, or in a subsequent modification, to species in a phylogenetic tree of evolutionary taxonomy. Linguists therefore describe the daughter languages within a language family as being genetically related.[1] According to Ethnologue
Ethnologue
the 7,099 living human languages are distributed in 141 different language families.[2] A "living language" is simply one that is used as the primary form of communication of a group of people
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Darkhad Dialect
Darkhad (also "Darkhat") is a dialect in-between Central Mongolian and Oirat[1] still variously seen as closer to Oirat[2] or as a dialect of Khalkha Mongolian with some Oirat features.[3] However, it seems to have substantially assimilated to the Khalkha dialect since it first was described by Sanžeev,[4] and some classificational differences seem to be due to what historical (or even ideal) state got classified
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Mongolian Sign Language
Mongolian Sign Language (Mongolian: Монгол дохионы хэл, Mongol dokhiony khel) is a sign language used in Mongolia. Ethnologue
Ethnologue
estimates that there were between 10,000 and 147,000 deaf people in Mongolia
Mongolia
as of 1998[update]; however, it is not known how many of those are users of MSL.[2] Mongolian Sign Language is widely spoken in areas where Mongolian diaspora have immigrated. Such locations involve California, Houston, and Charleston. Linda Ball, a Peace Corps
Peace Corps
volunteer in Mongolia, is believed to have created the first dictionary of MSL in 1995.[3] In 2007, another MSL dictionary with 3,000 entries was published by Mongolia's Ministry of Education, Culture, and Science with assistance from UNESCO.[4] Notes[edit]^ a b Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Mongolian Sign Language"
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