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Dukha
The Dukha, Dukhans[2] or Duhalar (Mongolian: Цаатан, Tsaatan) are a small Tuvan (Tozhu Tuvans) Turkic community of reindeer herders living in northern Khövsgöl Aimag of Mongolia. The name Tsaatan, which means ‘those who have reindeer’ in the Mongolian language, were originally Tuvinian reindeer herders.[3]Contents1 Language 2 History2.1 Origin 2.2 Settlement in northern Mongolia3 Dukha way of life3.1 Daily life 3.2 The use and management of reindeer 3.3 Seasonal migration and residential groups 3.4 Shelter 3.5 Clothing4 Belief and Religion 5 References 6 External linksLanguage[edit] Main article: Dukha language The Dukhan language (
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Dukkha
Dukkha
Dukkha
(/ˈduːkə/; Pāli; Sanskrit: duḥkha; Tibetan: སྡུག་བསྔལ་ sdug bsngal, pr. "duk-ngel") is an important Buddhist
Buddhist
concept, commonly translated as "suffering", "pain", "unsatisfactoriness" or "stress".[1][2][3][4] It refers to the fundamental unsatisfactoriness and painfulness of mundane life. It is the first of the Four Noble Truths
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Tree Stump
After a tree has been cut and felled, the stump or tree stump is usually a small remaining portion of the trunk with the roots still in the ground. Stumps may show the age-defining rings of a tree. The study of these rings is known as dendrochronology.stump sculpture by German artist Eberhard BossletContents1 Regeneration 2 Stump removal 3 Stump harvesting 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksRegeneration[edit] Stumps (both those on the ground and stumps of removed branches) are sometimes able to regenerate into new trees. Often, a deciduous tree that has been cut will re-sprout in multiple places around the edge of the stump or from the roots.[1] Depending on whether the tree is being removed permanently or whether the forest is expected to recover, this can be either desirable or undesirable
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Taiga
Taiga
Taiga
(/ˈtaɪɡə/; Russian: тайга́, IPA: [tɐjˈɡa]; from Turkic[1]), also known as boreal forest or snow forest, is a biome characterized by coniferous forests consisting mostly of pines, spruces and larches. The taiga is the world's largest biome apart from the oceans
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Grazing
Grazing
Grazing
is a method of feeding in which a herbivore feeds on plants such as grasses, or other multicellular organisms such as algae. In agriculture, grazing is one method used whereby domestic livestock are used to convert grass and other forage into meat, milk and other products. Many small selective herbivores follow larger grazers, who skim off the highest, tough growth of plants, exposing tender shoots. For terrestrial animals, grazing is normally distinguished from browsing in that grazing is eating grass or forbs, and browsing is eating woody twigs and leaves from trees and shrubs.[1] Grazing
Grazing
differs from true predation because the organism being grazed upon is not generally killed. Grazing
Grazing
differs from parasitism as the two organisms live together in a constant state of physical externality (i.e
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Herding
Herding
Herding
is the act of bringing individual animals together into a group (herd), maintaining the group, and moving the group from place to place—or any combination of those. Herding
Herding
can refer either to the process of animals forming herds in the wild, or to human intervention forming herds for some purpose. While the layperson uses the term "herding" to describe this human intervention, most individuals involved in the process term it mustering, "working stock", or droving. Some animals instinctively gather together as a herd. A group of animals fleeing a predator will demonstrate herd behavior for protection; while some predators, such as wolves and dogs have instinctive herding abilities derived from primitive hunting instincts.[1] Instincts in herding dogs and trainability can be measured at noncompetitive herding tests
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Milking
Milking
Milking
is the act of removing milk from the mammary glands of cattle, water buffalo, goats, sheep and more rarely camels, horses and donkeys. Milking
Milking
may be done by hand or by machine, and requires the animal to be currently or recently pregnant. The milker may refer either to the animal that produces the milk or the person who milks said animal.[1]Contents1 Hand milking 2 Machine milking 3 Venom milking 4 See also 5 External linksHand milking[edit] Hand milking is performed by massaging and pulling down on the teats of the udder, squirting the milk into a bucket
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Gray Wolf
refer Subspecies
Subspecies
of Canis
Canis
lupusHistorical (red + green) and modern (green) range of wild subspecies of C. lupusThe gray wolf ( Canis
Canis
lupus),[a] also known as the timber wolf[3][4] or western wolf,[b] is a canine native to the wilderness and remote areas of Eurasia
Eurasia
and North America
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Saddle
The saddle is a supportive structure for a rider or other load, fastened to an animal's back by a girth. The most common type is the equestrian saddle designed is for a horse. However, specialized saddles have been created for camels and other creatures.[1][2] It is not known precisely when riders first began to use some sort of padding or protection, but a blanket attached by some form of surcingle or girth was probably the first "saddle," followed later by more elaborate padded designs. The solid saddle tree was a later invention, and though early stirrup designs predated the invention of the solid tree, the paired stirrup, which attached to the tree, was the last element of the saddle to reach the basic form that is still used today. Today, modern saddles come in a wide variety of styles, each designed for a specific equestrianism discipline, and require careful fit to both the rider and the horse
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Reindeer Cheese
Cheese made from the milk of the reindeer has been historically found in Scandinavia. Modern Finnish cheeses like leipäjuusto were also made with reindeer milk in the past. Reindeer
Reindeer
milk is among the most rich and nutritious of milks, at 22% butterfat and 10% protein; however a reindeer can only be milked for about 1.5 cups per day.[1] Historical description[edit] Per the 1913 Pure Products: Reindeer
Reindeer
cheese, of which we present two illustrations taken from a paper by Barthel and Bergman may be called the richest of all whole milk cheeses, as nearly half its weight consists of butter fats. It is, in fact, a rich cream cheese. It is yellow on the outside and white on the interior, except in the neighborhood of the numerous cracks, where it is also yellow. When cut into, the white rapidly changes to a golden yellow
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Animal-powered Transport
The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to animal-powered transport: Animal-powered transport – broad category of the human use of non-human working animals (also known as "beasts of burden") for the movement of people and goods
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Districts Of Mongolia
Capital city niislel (нийслэл)Second levelDistrict sum (сум)Municipal District düüreg (дүүрэг)Third levelSubdistrict bag (баг)Municipal Subdistrict khoroo (хороо)MongoliaThis article is part of a series on the politics and government of MongoliaConstitutionHuman rightsHuman Rights CommissionExecutivePresident (list)Battulga KhaltmaaPrime Minister (list)Ukhnaagiin KhürelsükhLegislatureState Great KhuralSpeaker: Miyeegombyn Enkhbold Current membersJudiciarySupreme CourtElectionsRecent electionsPresidential: 2013 2017Legislative: 2012 2016Political partiesAdministrative divisionsAimags (provinces) Sumd (districts)Foreign relationsMinister of Foreign Affairs Diplomatic missionsof Mongolia to MongolisPassportVisa requirementsOthe
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Whip
A whip is a tool which was traditionally designed to strike animals or people to aid guidance or exert control over animals or other people, through pain compliance or fear of pain, although in some activities, whips can be used without use of pain, such as an additional pressure aid or visual directional cue in equestrianism. Whips are generally of two types, either a firm stick designed for direct contact, or a flexible whip that requires a specialized swing to be effective, but has a longer reach and greater force, but may have less precision. There are also whips which combine both a firm stick (the stock or handle) and a flexible line (the lash or thong), such as hunting whips. The majority of whips are designed for use on animals, although whips such as the "cat o' nine tails" and knout were specifically developed for flagellation as a means of inflicting corporal punishment or torture on human targets
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Antlers
Antlers are extensions of an animal's skull found in members of the deer family. They are true bone and are a single structure. They are generally found only on males, with the exception of the caribou.[1] Antlers are shed and regrown each year and function primarily as objects of sexual attraction and as weapons in fights between males for control of harems. In contrast, horns, found on pronghorn, sheep, goats, bison, cattle, and many other bovine, are two-part structures. An interior of bone (also an extension of the skull) is covered by an exterior sheath grown by specialized hair follicles, the same material as human fingernails and toenails. Horns are never shed and continue to grow throughout the animal's life. The exception to this rule is the pronghorn which sheds and regrows its horn sheath each year
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Shishged Gol
The Shishged River (Mongolian: Шишгэд гол, Russian: Шишгид-Гол) a river in northern Mongolia and in Tuva. It is part of the Yenisei's drainage basin, and the headwaters of the so-called Little (Small) Yenisei. It flows through the Darkhad Valley in northwestern Khövsgöl aimag, Mongolia and then westward through the Ulaan Taiga Mountain range to Russia. There it is joined by the Büsein River and Bilin Rivers to form the Kyzyl-Khem. Of its 344 km length, 298 are in Mongolia
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Traditional Chinese Medicine
Traditional Chinese medicine
Traditional Chinese medicine
(TCM; simplified Chinese: 中医; traditional Chinese: 中醫; pinyin: Zhōngyī) is a style of traditional medicine built on a foundation of more than 2,500 years of Chinese medical practice that includes various forms of herbal medicine, acupuncture, massage (tui na), exercise (qigong), and dietary therapy,[1] but recently also influenced by modern Western medicine
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