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Duke Of Modena
Emperor Frederick III elevated the Italian family of Este, Lords of Ferrara, to Dukes of Modena
Modena
and Reggio in 1452, and Dukes of Ferrara in 1471. In 1597, they lost the succession Duchy of Ferrara
Ferrara
itself to the Papal States. They continued to rule the Duchy of Modena
Modena
and Reggio in the Emilia until 1796, when it became part of Napoleon Bonaparte's Cispadane Republic
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Imperial And Royal Highness
Imperial and Royal Highness
Royal Highness
(abbreviation HI&RH) is a style possessed by someone who either through birth or marriage holds two individual styles, Imperial Highness and Royal Highness. His/Her Imperial Highness is a style used by members of an imperial family to denote imperial – as opposed to royal – status to show that the holder is descended from an Emperor
Emperor
rather than a King. Holders of the style Imperial Highness generally rank above holders of the style Royal Highness A primary example of the contemporary usage of this style is the Belgian Royal Family. HI&RH Lorenz, Archduke of Austria-Este, Prince of Belgium
Belgium
is a member of the Imperial House of Habsburg-Lorraine by birth, but upon his marriage to HRH Princess Astrid of Belgium, he also became a member of the Belgian Royal Family by marriage
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Niccolò III D'Este, Marquis Of Ferrara
Niccolò III d'Este (9 November 1383 – 26 December 1441) was Marquess of Ferrara
Ferrara
from 1393 until his death. He was also a condottiero.Contents1 Biography 2 Marriages and children 3 References 4 Footnotes 5 External linksBiography[edit] Born in Ferrara, the son of Alberto d'Este
Alberto d'Este
and Isotta Albaresani, he inherited the rule of the city in 1393 when only 10 years old. As a minor he was guided by a Regency Council supported by the Republics of Venice, Florence and Bologna. In 1395 the troops of the Regency Council were attacked at the Battle of Portomaggiore by Niccolò's relative Azzo X d'Este, a descendant of Obizzo II d'Este, who contested Niccolò's right to rule in Ferrara due to his illegitimate birth, even though Niccolò had been legitimated by his father
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Obizzo II D'Este
Obizzo II d'Este (c. 1247 – 13 February 1293) was Marquis of Ferrara and the March of Ancona. Biography[edit] He was a bastard,[1] the fruit of an illegitimate relation of Rinaldo I d'Este – the only son and heir of the Margrave Azzo VII d'Este – with a Neapolitan laundress. Soon after his birth, Obizzo was expelled from Ferrara
Ferrara
with his mother and settled in Ravenna. For his condition, Obizzo was destined to an obscure future; nevertheless, this situation changed in 1251: his father Rinaldo, a hostage of emperor Frederick II since 1238, was poisoned with his barren wife, Adelaide da Romano. Without any other sons to continue his line, the Margrave Azzo VII saw in Obizzo the only chance of survival of the House of Este
House of Este
and fought for his recognition as his heir
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Azzo VIII D'Este
Azzo VIII d'Este (died 31 January 1308[1]) was lord of Ferrara, Modena and Reggio from 1293 until his death. He inherited the family lands from his father, Obizzo II, whom Dante suggested in the Inferno he had assassinated. The Florentine poet cites him as half-son, but it is not clear if to stress Azzo's bad acts or if he was truly illegitimate. The early part of his rule was spent in almost continuous warfare: war with Padua at his accession and with Parma and Bologna
Bologna
in 1295–1299
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Aldobrandino II D'Este, Marquis Of Ferrara
Aldobrandino II d'Este (died 1326) was the marquess of Ferrara from 1308 until his death. He was the son of Obizzo II d'Este
Obizzo II d'Este
and Jacopina Fieschi, the niece of Pope Adrian V. Aldobrandino became lord of Ferrara at the death of his elder brother Azzo VIII, and renounced to the rights to Modena
Modena
and Reggio. He was succeeded by his sons Obizzo, Rinaldo and Niccolò.Preceded by Azzo VIII Marquess of Ferrara 1308–1326 Succeeded by Obizzo IIIThis biography of an Italian noble is a stub
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Obizzo III D'Este
Obizzo III d'Este (14 July 1294 – 20 March 1352) was the Marquess of Ferrara from 1317 until his death. He was the son of Aldobrandino II d'Este
Aldobrandino II d'Este
and Alda Rangoni. Life[edit] Obizzo was lord of Ferrara together with his brothers Rinaldo and Niccolò, and his cousin Folco II, but in the end reigned as sole ruler. He managed to enlarge the family possessions with the conquests of Modena
Modena
(1336) and Parma
Parma
(1344–1346). In May 1317 Obizzo married firstly Giacoma (d. 1341), daughter of Romeo de' Peppoli from Bologna,[1][2] with whom he had no children. There are also reports that he married Elisabeth of Saxony, Angria and Westphalia, daughter of Albert II, Duke of Saxony. In 1347 Obizzo married secondly Lippa Ariosti, known as la Bella and his long-time mistress
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Aldobrandino III D'Este, Marquis Of Ferrara
Aldobrandino III d'Este (14 September 1335 – 3 November 1361) was the Lord of Ferrara
Lord of Ferrara
and Modena
Modena
from 1352 until his death, in 1361. He was the son of Obizzo III d'Este
Obizzo III d'Este
and Lippa Ariosti. He was one of the first Italian lords to accompany Charles IV in his march to Rome
Rome
to receive the imperial coronation, this deed gaining him numerous privileges.Preceded by Obizzo III Marquess of Ferrara 1352–1361 Succeeded by Niccolò IIThis biography of an Italian noble is a stub
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Niccolò II D'Este, Marquis Of Ferrara
Niccolò II d'Este (1338 – 26 March 1388) was lord of Ferrara, Modena
Modena
and Parma
Parma
from 1361 until his death. He was the son of Obizzo III, who had ruled in Ferrara
Ferrara
from 1317 to 1352. After inheriting his lands from Aldobrandino III, he allied with Padua, Verona
Verona
and Mantua
Mantua
against Bernabò Visconti
Bernabò Visconti
and, after a meeting at Viterbo, he managed to obtain also the support of Pope Urban V
Urban V
(1367). During Niccolò's reign, Ferrara
Ferrara
started to gain a reputation as an art city. He commissioned to Bartolino da Novara
Bartolino da Novara
the construction of the Castello Estense
Castello Estense
after a popular revolt in 1385. References[edit]Muratori, Ludovico Antonio (1717)
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Azzo X D'Este
Azzo X d'Este (1344–1415) was an Italian condottiero, a member of the House of Este. Born into a cadet branch of the family, he contested the seigniory of Ferrara
Ferrara
to the young Niccolò III, an illegitimate son of marquess Alberto d'Este
Alberto d'Este
who was under the protection of Pope Benedict IX
Pope Benedict IX
and Venice. After a failed attempt to poison him, Azzo created a compagnia of mercenaries, with the supports of some Este vassals. However, his invasions of the Ferrara
Ferrara
territory was crushed by Azzo da Castello, and he retired to the Modenese. With the help of Giovanni da Barbiano and an army of 8,000 men, in 1395 he tried again the capture of Ferrara, taking advantage of da Castello's death. But he was again heavily defeated at the Battle of Portomaggiore (April 16), this time by a Venetian army, and imprisoned
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Alberto D'Este, Marquis Of Ferrara
Alberto (V) d'Este (27 February 1347 – 30 July 1393) was lord of Ferrara and Modena
Modena
from 1388 until his death. He was associated in the lordship of the House of Este
House of Este
by his brother Niccolò in 1361, becoming the sole ruler of Ferrara and Modena
Modena
after the latter's death in 1388. He was the son of Obizzo III d'Este, Marquis of Ferrara, who had ruled in Ferrara from 1317 to 1352. Alberto founded the University of Ferrara
University of Ferrara
in 1391. In the same year he married Giovanna de' Roberti (d. 1393). After her death, he married his mistress Isotta Albaresani. He was succeeded by his legitimated son Niccolò (III). References[edit]L. A. Muratori. Delle antichità Estensi. 1717, Modena; G. B. Pigna. Historia dei Principi d'Este
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Gigliola Da Carrara
Gigliola da Carrara (1379–1416) was the Marchioness
Marchioness
of Ferrara, daughter of Francesco Novello da Carrara, lord of Padua, son of Francesco I da Carrara, and Taddea d'Este. The 13 years old Marchioness
Marchioness
of Ferrara
Ferrara
married the Marquis Niccolò III d'Este, son of Alberto V d'Este, in 1394 for 15 years. She died of the plague in 1416,[1] leaving no children
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Folco I D'Este
Fulco I d’Este (died December 15 1128)[1][2] was the ancestor of the Italian line of the House of Este.Contents1 Life 2 Family 3 External links 4 ReferencesLife[edit] Fulco was a son of Albert Azzo II, Margrave of Milan
Albert Azzo II, Margrave of Milan
and Garsende of Maine, the daughter of Herbert I, Count of Maine. After his father's death in 1097, Fulco inherited the family's Italian possessions, which lay mainly in Veneto, around Mantua, Padua, Treviso
Treviso
and Verona, while his older half brother Welf inherited the lands north of the Alps. However, Welf did not accept this division, and unsuccessfully attempted to take these lands from Fulco after their father's death in 1097. The powerful Bavarian line of the family, the Guelphs, did not renounce these lands until the time of Henry the Lion
Henry the Lion
in 1154
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Parisina Malatesta
Laura Malatesta[1] (1404 – 21 May 1425), better known as Parisina
Parisina
Malatesta, was the daughter of Andrea Malatesta, lord of Cesena,[2] and his second wife, Lucrezia Ordelaffi.[3] She had an affair with her bastard stepson Ugo d'Este, and both were beheaded by her husband, Marquis Niccolò III d'Este
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Ricciarda, Marchioness Of Saluzzo
Ricciardia, Marquess of Saluzzo (1410 – 16 August 1474, Ferrara) was an Italian noblewoman. She was the daughter of Thomas III, Marquess of Saluzzo and his French wife Marguerite de Pierrepont, daughter of Ugo II de Pierrepont, count of Roncy and Braine[1] In 1429 she married Niccolò III d'Este
Niccolò III d'Este
- she was his third wife, after Gigliola da Carrara and Parisina Malatesta. They had two children:Ercole (1431 – 1505), future duke of Ferrara; Sigismondo (1433 – 1507), lord of San Martino in Rio.After Niccolò's death in 1441, the ten-year-old Ercole could in theory have succeeded his father as his eldest legitimate child. However, her father instead left the title to his illegitimate son Leonello,[2] who exiled Ricciardia and her two children to Naples.[3] Leonello reigned for nine years, and then was succeeded by his brother Borso, who reigned for a further 21 years
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Taddeo D'Este
Taddeo d'Este
Taddeo d'Este
(ca. 1390 – 21 June 1448) was a condottiere, a freelance military leader, who was known for his defense of the Republic of Venice
Republic of Venice
in 1439 against Milanese forces under Niccolò Piccinino. Unlike many other condottieri of the day, who often changed sides, he served Venice almost exclusively throughout his thirty-year military career
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