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Dubuque, IA
Dubuque /dəˈbjuːk/ ( listen) is the county seat of Dubuque County, Iowa, United States,[4] located along the Mississippi River. In 2013, its population was 58,253, making it the tenth-largest city in the state.[5] This city lies at the junction of Iowa, Illinois, and Wisconsin, a region locally known as the Tri-State Area. It serves as the main commercial, industrial, educational, and cultural center for the area. Geographically, it is part of the Driftless Area, a portion of North America that escaped all three phases of the Wisconsinian Glaciation. It is one of the few cities in Iowa
Iowa
with hills, and a tourist destination featuring the city's unique architecture and river location. It is home to five institutions of higher education, making it a center for culture and learning. Dubuque has long been a center of manufacturing, but the economy grew rapidly and diversified to other areas in the first years of the 21st century
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Dubuque (other)
Dubuque may refer to: Places[edit]United StatesDubuque, Iowa Dubuque County, Iowa Dubuque, Kansas East Dubuque, Illinois University of Dubuque USS DubuqueSurnames[edit]Julien Dubuque, a French Canadian who arrived near what now is known as Dubuque, Iowa Joe Dubuque, American amateur wrestler Alexandre Dubuque, French-Russian composerThis disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Dubuque. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the
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Lead
Lead
Lead
is a chemical element with symbol Pb (from the Latin
Latin
plumbum) and atomic number 82. It is a heavy metal that is denser than most common materials. Lead
Lead
is soft and malleable, and has a relatively low melting point. When freshly cut, lead is bluish-white; it tarnishes to a dull gray color when exposed to air. Lead
Lead
has the highest atomic number of any stable element and three of its isotopes each conclude a major decay chain of heavier elements. Lead
Lead
is a relatively unreactive post-transition metal. Its weak metallic character is illustrated by its amphoteric nature; lead and lead oxides react with acids and bases, and it tends to form covalent bonds. Compounds of lead
Compounds of lead
are usually found in the +2 oxidation state rather than the +4 state common with lighter members of the carbon group
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Driftless Area
The Driftless Area
The Driftless Area
is a region in Minnesota, Wisconsin, northwestern Illinois, and northeastern Iowa
Iowa
of the American Midwest
Midwest
that was never glaciated
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North America
North America
North America
is a continent entirely within the Northern Hemisphere and almost all within the Western Hemisphere; it is also considered by some to be a northern subcontinent of the Americas.[3][4] It is bordered to the north by the Arctic
Arctic
Ocean, to the east by the Atlantic Ocean, to the west and south by the Pacific Ocean, and to the southeast by South America
South America
and the Caribbean
Caribbean
Sea. North America
North America
covers an area of about 24,709,000 square kilometers (9,540,000 square miles), about 16.5% of the earth's land area and about 4.8% of its total surface
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Wisconsinian Glaciation
The Wisconsin Glacial Episode, also called the Wisconsinan glaciation, was the most recent glacial period of the North American ice sheet complex. This advance included the Cordilleran Ice Sheet, which nucleated in the northern North American Cordillera; the Innuitian ice sheet, which extended across the Canadian Arctic Archipelago; the Greenland ice sheet; and the massive Laurentide ice sheet,[1] which covered the high latitudes of central and eastern North America. This advance was synchronous with global glaciation during the last glacial period, including the North American alpine glacier advance, known as the Pinedale glaciation. The Wisconsin glaciation
Wisconsin glaciation
extended from approximately 75,000 to 11,000 years ago, between the Sangamon interglacial (known globally as the Eemian
Eemian
stage) and the current interglacial, the Holocene
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Higher Education
Higher education
Higher education
(also called post-secondary education, third level or tertiary education) is an optional final stage of formal learning that occurs after completion of secondary education. Often delivered at universities, academies, colleges, seminaries, conservatories, and institutes of technology, higher education is also available through certain college-level institutions, including vocational schools, trade schools, and other career colleges that award academic degrees or professional certifications. Tertiary education
Tertiary education
at non-degree level is sometimes referred to as further education or continuing education as distinct from higher education. The right of access to higher education is mentioned in a number of international human rights instruments
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Midwest
The Midwestern United States, also referred to as the American Midwest, Middle West, or simply the Midwest, is one of four geographic regions defined by the United States
United States
Census Bureau. It occupies the northern central part of the United States
United States
of America.[2] It was officially named the North Central region by the Census Bureau until 1984.[3] It is located between the Northeastern U.S.
Northeastern U.S.
and the Western U.S., with Canada
Canada
to its north and the Southern U.S.
Southern U.S.
to its south. The Census Bureau's definition consists of 12 states in the north central United States: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin
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Spain
Coordinates: 40°N 4°W / 40°N 4°W / 40; -4Kingdom of Spain Reino de España  (Spanish)6 other official names[a][b]Aragonese: Reino d'EspanyaAsturian: Reinu d'EspañaBasque: Espainiako ErresumaCatalan: Regne d'EspanyaGalician: Reino de EspañaOccitan: Reiaume d'EspanhaFlagCoat of armsMotto: "Plus Ultra" (Latin) "Further Beyond"Anthem: "Marcha Real" (Spanish)[2] "Royal March"Location of  Spain  (dark green) – in Europe  (green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (green)Capital and largest city Madrid 40°26′N 3°42′W / 40.433°N 3.700°W / 40.433; -3.700Official language and national language Spanish[c]Co-official languages in certain autonomous communities Catalan Galician Basque OccitanEthnic groups (2015)89.9% Spanish 10.1% othersReligi
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Seven Years' War
Anglo-Prusso-Portuguese coalition victoryTreaty of Saint Petersburg (1762) Treaty of Hamburg (1762) Treaty of Paris (1763) Treaty of Hubertusburg
Treaty of Hubertusburg
(1763)Territorial changes Status quo ante bellum in Europe. Transfer of colonial possessions between Great Britain, France, Spain, and Portugal.France cedes its possessions east of the Mississippi River, Canada (except Saint-Pierre and Miquelon), the island of Grenada, and the Northern Circars
Northern Circars
in India
India
to Great Britain. France cedes Louisiana
Louisiana
and its territory west of the Mississippi River to Spain. Spain
Spain
cedes Florida to Great Britain. Four "neutral" Caribbean
Caribbean
islands divided between Britain (St. Vincent, Tobago, Dominica) and France (St
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Quebec
Quebec (/k(w)ɪˈbɛk/ ( listen);[8] French: Québec [kebɛk] ( listen))[9] is one of the thirteen provinces and territories of Canada. It is bordered to the west by the province of Ontario and the bodies of water James Bay and Hudson Bay; to the north by Hudson Strait and Ungava Bay; to the east by the Gulf of Saint Lawrence and the province of Newfoundland and Labrador; and to the south by the province of New Brunswick and the U.S. states of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, and New York. It also shares maritime borders with Nunavut, Prince Edward Island, and Nova Scotia. Quebec is Canada's largest province by area and its second-largest administrative division; only the territory of Nunavut is larger
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Fox (tribe)
The Meskwaki
Meskwaki
(sometimes spelled Mesquakie) are a Native American people often known to European-Americans as the Fox tribe. They have been closely linked to the Sauk people
Sauk people
of the same language family. In the Meskwaki
Meskwaki
language, the Meskwaki
Meskwaki
call themselves Meshkwahkihaki, which means "the Red-Earths," related to their creation story. Historically their homelands were in the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
region. The tribe coalesced in the St. Lawrence River
St. Lawrence River
Valley in present-day Ontario, Canada
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Louisiana Purchase
The Louisiana
Louisiana
Purchase (French: Vente de la Louisiane "Sale of Louisiana") was the acquisition of the Louisiana
Louisiana
territory (828,000 square miles or 2.14 million km²) by the United States
United States
from France in 1803. The U.S. paid fifty million francs ($11,250,000) and a cancellation of debts worth eighteen million francs ($3,750,000) for a total of sixty-eight million francs ($15 million, equivalent to $300 million in 2016). The Louisiana
Louisiana
territory included land from fifteen present U.S. states and two Canadian provinces
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Illinois
Illinois
Illinois
(/ˌɪlɪˈnɔɪ/ ( listen) IL-ih-NOY) is a state in the Midwestern region of the United States. It is the 6th most populous state and 25th largest state in terms of land area, and is often noted as a microcosm of the entire country.[7] With Chicago
Chicago
in the northeast, small industrial cities and great agricultural productivity in central and northern Illinois, and natural resources like coal, timber, and petroleum in the south, Illinois
Illinois
has a diverse economic base and is a major transportation hub. The Port of Chicago connects the state to other global ports from the Great Lakes, via the Saint Lawrence Seaway, to the Atlantic Ocean, as well as the Great Lakes to the Mississippi
Mississippi
River, via the Illinois Waterway
Illinois Waterway
on the Illinois
Illinois
River
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Saint Mary's Catholic Church (Dubuque)
Saint Mary's Catholic Church is a former parish of the Archdiocese of Dubuque. The church is located in Dubuque, Iowa, United States, at the corner of 15th and White Streets. The church is recognizable by its steeple– one of the tallest in the area. The church property was added to the National Register of Historic Places as an historic district in 2015, and the various buildings were included as contributing properties in the Washington Residential Historic District later in the same year.[2]Contents1 History1.1 The beginning 1.2 Construction of the new St. Mary's Church 1.3 From 1867 to 1922 1.4 From 1922 to the present2 ReferencesHistory[edit] The beginning[edit] During the 1840s, a number of German families moved to the city of Dubuque. Many of these families were Catholic. Initially, they attended Mass at St. Raphael's Cathedral. However, the cathedral was becoming quite crowded due to the growing German and Irish populations of the city
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Unorganized Territory
In the United States, an unorganized territory is a region of land without a "normally" constituted system of government. This does not mean that the territory has no government at all or that it is unclaimed territory. In practice, such territories are always sparsely populated. Historically, the term "unorganized territory" was applied to an area in which there was no effective government control of affairs on a day-to-day basis, such as the former U.S. territories where the government exerted only transient control when its forces were actually present. In modern usage it indicates an area in which local government does not exist, or exists only in embryonic form. However the area is still, at least in theory, governed by the nation of which it forms part, or by a smaller unit of that nation. These lightly governed regions were common in the 19th century during the growth of United States
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