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Druk
The Druk
Druk
(Standard Tibetan: འབྲུག, Dzongkha: འབྲུག་) is the "Thunder Dragon" of Tibetan and Bhutanese mythology and a Bhutanese national symbol. A druk appears on the flag of Bhutan, holding jewels to represent wealth. In Dzongkha, Bhutan is called Druk
Druk
Yul "Land of Druk", and Bhutanese leaders are called Druk Gyalpo, "Thunder Dragon
Dragon
Kings"
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Tibet
Coordinates: 31°12′N 88°48′E / 31.2°N 88.8°E / 31.2; 88.8              "Greater Tibet" as claimed by Tibetan exile groups Tibetan autonomous areas, as designated by China  Tibet
Tibet
Autonomous Region, within ChinaChinese-controlled, claimed by
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Dzongkha
Dzongkha, or Bhutanese (རྫོང་ཁ་ [dzoŋkʰa]), is a Sino-Tibetan language spoken by over half a million people in Bhutan; it is the sole official and national language of the Kingdom of Bhutan.[4] The Tibetan alphabet
Tibetan alphabet
is used to write Dzongkha. The word dzongkha means "the language of the district"; kha is language, and dzong is "district"
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Bakunawa
The Bakunawa, also spelled Bakonawa, Baconaua, or Bakonaua, is a dragon in Philippine mythology
Philippine mythology
that is often represented as a gigantic sea serpent. It is believed to be the cause of eclipses.[1] It appears as a giant sea serpent with a mouth the size of a lake, a red tongue, whiskers, gills, small wires at its sides, and two sets of wings, one is large and ash-gray while the other is small and is found further down its body. The Visayan (Cebuano) term bakunawa is the direct translation of the word 'eclipse'. Binakunawa is a verb to mean "to cause an eclipse".[2]Contents1 Mythology1.1 Bicolano version2 Literature 3 Similar creatures 4 Sword
Sword
hilt ornaments 5 Games5.1 Objective6 Pop culture 7 Television 8 See also 9 ReferencesMythology[edit] Tales about the Bakunawa say that it is the cause of eclipses
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Pakhangba
Pakhangba
Pakhangba
is the supreme God of the Meetei tradition that is used as a heraldic emblem in Manipur. It was present in most emblems of the Princely state of Manipur
Manipur
and it originated in Paphal, an ancient deity of the traditional beliefs preceding Hinduism
Hinduism
in the region. This creature was said to inhabit sacred ponds and groves, as well as mountains, rivers, lakes, forests and caves. Among the Meitheis, the ancestor of one of the clans manifested himself as the Pakhangba.[1] There was also an important king named after this mythical man who ruled from 1665 to 1696
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Vietnamese Dragon
Vietnamese dragons (Vietnamese: rồng 龍) are symbolic creatures in the folklore and mythology of Vietnam. According to an ancient origin myth, the Vietnamese people
Vietnamese people
are descended from a dragon and a fairy. To Vietnamese people, the dragon brings rain, essential for agriculture. It represents the emperor, the prosperity and power of the nation
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Tibetan Mythology
Tibetan mythology comprises the traditional and religious stories of Tibet
Tibet
both pre-Buddhist and Buddhist.[1]Contents1 National mythology 2 Buddhism 3 Creatures 4 See also 5 ReferencesNational mythology[edit] National mythology and legendary history includes stories include Pha Trelgen Changchup Sempa mythical monkey-ancestor of the Tibetan people, the
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Dzongkha Language
Dzongkha, or Bhutanese (རྫོང་ཁ་ [dzoŋkʰa]), is a Sino-Tibetan language spoken by over half a million people in Bhutan; it is the sole official and national language of the Kingdom of Bhutan.[4] The Tibetan alphabet
Tibetan alphabet
is used to write Dzongkha. The word dzongkha means "the language of the district"; kha is language, and dzong is "district"
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Standard Tibetan Language
Standard Tibetan[4] is the most widely spoken form of the Tibetic languages. It is based on the speech of Lhasa, an Ü-Tsang (Central Tibetan) dialect. For this reason, Standard Tibetan
Standard Tibetan
is often called Lhasa
Lhasa
Tibetan.[5] Tibetan is an official[6] language of the Tibet Autonomous Region of the People's Republic of China
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Tibetan Alphabet
Egyptian hieroglyphs
Egyptian hieroglyphs
32 c. BCE Hieratic
Hieratic
32 c. BCEDemotic 7 c. BCEMeroitic 3 c. BCEProto-Sinaitic 19 c. BCEUgaritic 15 c. BCE Epigraphic South Arabian 9 c. BCEGe’ez 5–6 c. BCEPhoenician 12 c. BCEPaleo-Hebrew 10 c. BCESamaritan 6 c. BCE Libyco-Berber
Libyco-Berber
3 c. BCETifinaghPaleohispanic (semi-syllabic) 7 c. BCE Aramaic 8 c. BCE Kharoṣṭhī
Kharoṣṭhī
4 c. BCE Brāhmī 4 c. BCE Brahmic family
Brahmic family
(see)E.g. Tibetan 7 c. CE Devanagari
Devanagari
13 c. CECanadian syllabics 1840Hebrew 3 c. BCE Pahlavi 3 c. BCEAvestan 4 c. CEPalmyrene 2 c. BCE Syriac 2 c. BCENabataean 2 c. BCEArabic 4 c. CEN'Ko 1949 CESogdian 2 c. BCEOrkhon (old Turkic) 6 c. CEOld Hungarian c. 650 CEOld UyghurMongolian 1204 CEMandaic 2 c. CEGreek 8 c. BCEEtruscan 8 c. BCELatin 7 c
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Korean Dragon
Korean dragons are legendary creatures in Korean mythology
Korean mythology
and folklore. The appearance of the dragon reflects its influences from its counterpart, the Chinese dragon.Contents1 Korean dragons 2 Imugi 3 Korean cockatrice 4 Other Asian dragons 5 Further reading 6 External linksKorean dragons[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (December 2010) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)Whereas most dragons in European mythology are linked to the elements of fire and destruction, dragons in Korean mythology
Korean mythology
are primarily benevolent beings related to water and agriculture, often considered bringers of rain and clouds
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Nāga
Nāga
Nāga
(IAST: nāgá; Devanāgarī: नाग) is the Sanskrit
Sanskrit
and Pali word for a deity or class of entity or being taking the form of a very great snake, specifically the king cobra, found in the Indian religions of Hinduism, Buddhism
Buddhism
and Jainism. A female nāga is a nāgin" or nāgini".[1]Contents1 Etymology 2 Hinduism 3 Buddhism 4 Other traditions4.1 Malaysia 4.2 Cambodia 4.3 Laos 4.4 Indonesia 4.5 Philippines5 Notable nāgas 6 In popular culture 7 Gallery 8 See also 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksEtymology[edit] Wikispecies
Wikispecies
has information related to Naja najaIn Sanskrit, a nāgá (नाग) is a cobra, the Indian cobra
Indian cobra
(Naja naja). A synonym for nāgá is phaṇin (फणिन्)
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Japanese Dragon
Japanese dragons (日本の竜 Nihon no ryū) are diverse legendary creatures in Japanese mythology
Japanese mythology
and folklore. Japanese dragon
Japanese dragon
myths amalgamate native legends with imported stories about dragons from China, Korea
Korea
and India. The style of the dragon was heavily influenced by the Chinese dragon. Like these other Asian dragons, most Japanese ones are water deities associated with rainfall and bodies of water, and are typically depicted as large, wingless, serpentine creatures with clawed feet
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Emblem Of Bhutan
The emblem of Bhutan
Bhutan
(Dzongkha: རྒྱལ་ཡོངས་ལས་རྟགས་;Wylie: rgyal-yongs las-rtags) maintains several elements of the flag of Bhutan, with slightly different artistry, and contains much Buddhist symbolism. The official description is as follows: "The national emblem, contained in a circle, is composed of a double diamond-thunderbolt (dorje) placed above a lotus, surmounted by a jewel and framed by two dragons. The thunderbolt represents the harmony between secular and religious power
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National Anthem
A national anthem (also state anthem, national hymn, national song, etc.) is generally a patriotic musical composition that evokes and eulogizes the history, traditions, and struggles of its people, recognized either by a nation's government as the official national song, or by convention through use by the people. The majority of national anthems are marches or hymns in style. The countries of Latin America, Central Asia, and Europe
Europe
tend towards more ornate and operatic pieces, while those in the Middle East, Oceania, Africa, and the Caribbean
Caribbean
use a more simplistic fanfare.[1]Contents1 Languages 2 History 3 Usage 4 Creators 5 Modality 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksLanguages[edit] A national anthem is most often in the national or most common language of the country, whether de facto or official, there are notable exceptions
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