HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Drilling And Blasting
Drilling and blasting
Drilling and blasting
is the controlled use of explosives and other methods such as gas pressure blasting pyrotechnics, to break rock for excavation. It is practiced most often in mining, quarrying and civil engineering such as dam or road construction. The result of rock blasting is often known as a rock cut. Drilling and blasting
Drilling and blasting
currently utilizes many different varieties of explosives with different compositions and performance properties. Higher velocity explosives are used for relatively hard rock in order to shatter and break the rock, while low velocity explosives are used in soft rocks to generate more gas pressure and a greater heaving effect
[...More...]

"Drilling And Blasting" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Explosives
An explosive material, also called an explosive, is a reactive substance that contains a great amount of potential energy that can produce an explosion if released suddenly, usually accompanied by the production of light, heat, sound, and pressure. An explosive charge is a measured quantity of explosive material, which may be composed of a single ingredient or a combination of two or more. The potential energy stored in an explosive material may, for example, bechemical energy, such as nitroglycerin or grain dust pressurized gas, such as a gas cylinder or aerosol can nuclear energy, such as in the fissile isotopes uranium-235 and plutonium-239 Explosive
Explosive
materials may be categorized by the speed at which they expand. Materials that detonate (the front of the chemical reaction moves faster through the material than the speed of sound) are said to be "high explosives" and materials that deflagrate are said to be "low explosives"
[...More...]

"Explosives" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Sideling Hill
Sideling Hill (also Side Long Hill[1]) is a long, steep, narrow mountain ridge in the Ridge-and-Valley (or Allegheny Mountains) physiographic province of the Appalachian Mountains, located in Washington County in western Maryland and adjacent West Virginia and Pennsylvania, USA. The highest point on the ridge is Fisher Point, at 2,310 feet (700 m)[2] in Fulton County, Pennsylvania.[1]Contents1 Geology 2 Ecology 3 Highway, railroad, and canal crossings3.1 East Broad Top Railroad Tunnel (Pennsylvania) 3.2 Pennsylvania Turnpike (I-76) 3.3 Sideling Hill Tunnel (Pennsylvania) 3.4 Sideling Hill Road Cut (I-68 and U.S. 40, Maryland)3.4.1 Rest stop and former Exhibit Center3.5 National Road (U.S
[...More...]

"Sideling Hill" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Lærdalstunnelen
The Lærdal Tunnel (Norwegian: Lærdalstunnelen) is a 24.51-kilometre-long (15.23 mi) long road tunnel connecting Lærdal and Aurland in Sogn og Fjordane, Norway and located approximately 175–200 kilometres (109–124 mi) north-east of Bergen. It is the longest road tunnel in the world succeeding the Swiss Gotthard Road Tunnel. The tunnel carries two lanes of European Route E16 and represents the final link on the new main highway connecting Oslo and Bergen without ferry connections and difficult mountain crossings during winter. In 1975, the Parliament of Norway decided that the main road between Oslo and Bergen would run via Filefjell. In 1992, Parliament confirmed that decision, made the further decision that the road should run through a tunnel between Lærdal and Aurland, and passed legislation to build the tunnel. Construction started in 1995 and the tunnel opened in 2000
[...More...]

"Lærdalstunnelen" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tonnes
The tonne (/tʌn/ ( listen)) (Non-SI unit, symbol: t), commonly referred to as the metric ton in the United States, is a non-SI metric unit of mass equal to 1,000 kilograms;[1][2][3][4] or one megagram (Mg); it is equivalent to approximately 2,204.6 pounds,[5] 1.102 short tons (US) or 0.984 long tons (imperial). Although not part of the SI, the tonne is accepted for use with SI units and prefixes by the International Committee for Weights and Measures.[6]Contents1 Symbol and abbreviations 2 Origin and spelling 3 Conversions 4 Derived units 5 Alternative usage5.1 Use of mass as proxy for energy 5.2 Unit of force6 See also 7 Notes and references 8 External linksSymbol and abbreviations[edit] The SI symbol for the tonne is "t", adopted at the same time as the unit in 1879.[2] Its use is also official for the metric ton in the United States, having been adopted by the United States National Institute of Standards and Technology.[7] It
[...More...]

"Tonnes" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Scandinavia
Scandinavia[a] (/ˌskændɪˈneɪviə/ SKAN-dih-NAY-vee-ə) is a region in Northern Europe, characterized by common ethnocultural North Germanic heritage and mutually intelligible North Germanic languages.[2] The term Scandinavia
Scandinavia
in local usage covers the three kingdoms of Denmark, Norway, and Sweden, but in English usage, it also sometimes refers to the Scandinavian Peninsula
Scandinavian Peninsula
or to the broader region which includes Finland
Finland
and Iceland.[1] This broader region is usually known locally as the Nordic countries.[3] The remote Norwegian islands of Svalbard
Svalbard
and Jan Mayen
Jan Mayen
are usually not seen as a part of Scandinavia, nor is Greenland, a constituent country within the Kingdom of Denmark
[...More...]

"Scandinavia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Citybanan
The Stockholm City Line (Swedish: Citybanan) is a commuter railway tunnel beneath central Stockholm in Sweden which is used by the Stockholm Commuter Rail. The line is 7.4 kilometres (4.6 mi) long, double track and electrified. It has two stations: Stockholm City Station is located directly below T-Centralen, the central station of the Stockholm Metro. The Odenplan station is the other station, and it is located next to the Odenplan metro station. The line entered service on 10 July 2017.[1]Contents1 Route 2 History 3 References 4 External linksRoute[edit] The tunnel significantly improves the traffic throughput to and from south of Stockholm as there are only two tracks in that direction from Stockholm Central Station, the same number that were in place in 1871 when the railway was originally built. It has 24 scheduled trains per hour in each direction. The commuter trains pass Stockholm with up to 16 trains per hour per direction
[...More...]

"Citybanan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Blasting Mat
A blasting mat is a mat usually made of sliced-up rubber tires bound together with ropes, cables or chains. They are used during rock blasting to contain the blast, prevent flying rocks and suppress dust.Contents1 Use 2 Materials 3 Manufacturing 4 Military use 5 Accidents 6 ReferencesUse[edit] Blasting mats are used when explosives are detonated in places such as quarries or construction sites
[...More...]

"Blasting Mat" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rock Bolt
A rock bolt is a long anchor bolt, for stabilizing rock excavations, which may be used in tunnels or rock cuts. It transfers load from the unstable exterior to the confined (and much stronger) interior of the rock mass. Rock bolts were first used in mining in the 1890s, with systematic use documented at the St Joseph Lead Mine in the U.S. in the 1920s. Rock bolts were applied to civil tunneling support in the U.S. and in Australia starting in the late 1940s. Rock bolts were used and further developed starting in 1947 by Australian engineers who began experimenting with four-meter-long expanding anchor rock bolts while working on the Snowy Mountains Scheme.[1]Typical rock bolting pattern for a tunnelAs shown in the figure, rock bolts are almost always installed in a pattern, the design of which depends on the rock quality designation and the type of excavation.[2] Rock bolts are an essential component of the New Austrian Tunneling method
[...More...]

"Rock Bolt" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Shotcrete
Shotcrete
Shotcrete
or sprayed concrete (Gunite®) is concrete or mortar conveyed through a hose and pneumatically projected at high velocity onto a surface, as a construction technique. It is typically reinforced by conventional steel rods, steel mesh, or fibers. Shotcrete
Shotcrete
is usually an all-inclusive term for both the wet-mix and dry-mix versions. In pool construction, however, shotcrete refers to wet mix and gunite to dry mix. In this context, these terms are not interchangeable. Shotcrete
Shotcrete
is placed and compacted at the same time, due to the force with the nozzle. It can be sprayed onto any type or shape of surface, including vertical or overhead areas.Contents1 History 2 Dry vs. wet mix 3 Shotcrete
Shotcrete
machines 4 Mining applications 5 Shotcrete
Shotcrete
vs
[...More...]

"Shotcrete" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bingham Canyon Mine
The Bingham Canyon Mine, more commonly known as Kennecott Copper
Copper
Mine among locals,[3] is an open-pit mining operation extracting a large porphyry copper deposit southwest of Salt Lake City, Utah, in the Oquirrh Mountains. The mine is the largest man-made excavation in the world[4] and is considered to have produced more copper than any other mine in history – more than 19 million tonnes.[5] The mine is owned by Rio Tinto Group, a British-Australian multinational corporation. The copper operations at Bingham Canyon Mine
Bingham Canyon Mine
are managed through Kennecott Utah
Utah
Copper
Copper
Corporation which operates the mine, a concentrator plant, a smelter, and a refinery. The mine has been in production since 1906, and has resulted in the creation of a pit over 0.6 miles (970 m) deep, 2.5 miles (4 km) wide, and covering 1,900 acres (770 ha)
[...More...]

"Bingham Canyon Mine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Topography
Topography
Topography
is the study of the shape and features of the surface of the Earth
Earth
and other observable astronomical objects including planets, moons, and asteroids. The topography of an area could refer to the surface shapes and features themselves, or a description (especially their depiction in maps). This field of geoscience and planetary science is concerned with local detail in general, including not only relief but also natural and artificial features, and even local history and culture. This meaning is less common in the United States, where topographic maps with elevation contours have made "topography" synonymous with relief. The older sense of topography as the study of place still has currency in Europe. Topography
Topography
in a narrow sense involves the recording of relief or terrain, the three-dimensional quality of the surface, and the identification of specific landforms
[...More...]

"Topography" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rock (geology)
Rock or stone is a natural substance, a solid aggregate of one or more minerals or mineraloids. For example, granite, a common rock, is a combination of the minerals quartz, feldspar and biotite. The Earth's outer solid layer, the lithosphere, is made of rock. Rock has been used by humankind throughout history. The minerals and metals in rocks have been essential to human civilization.[1] Three major groups of rocks are defined: igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic. The scientific study of rocks is called petrology, which is an essential component of geology.Contents1 Classification1.1 Igneous rock 1.2 Sedimentary rock 1.3 Metamorphic rock2 Human use2.1 Mining3 See also 4 References 5 External linksClassification See also: Formation of rocksRock outcrop along a mountain creek near Orosí, Costa Rica.Rocks are composed of grains of minerals, which are homogeneous solids formed from a chemical compound arranged in an orderly manner
[...More...]

"Rock (geology)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Demolition
Demolition
Demolition
is the tearing down of buildings and other man-made structures. Demolition
Demolition
contrasts with deconstruction, which involves taking a building apart while carefully preserving valuable elements for re-use purposes. For small buildings, such as houses, that are only two or three stories high, demolition is a rather simple process. The building is pulled down either manually or mechanically using large hydraulic equipment: elevated work platforms, cranes, excavators or bulldozers. Larger buildings may require the use of a wrecking ball, a heavy weight on a cable that is swung by a crane into the side of the buildings. Wrecking balls are especially effective against masonry, but are less easily controlled and often less efficient than other methods. Newer methods may use rotational hydraulic shears and silenced rock-breakers attached to excavators to cut or break through wood, steel, and concrete
[...More...]

"Demolition" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Building Implosion
In the controlled demolition industry, building implosion is the strategic placing of explosive material and timing of its detonation so that a structure collapses on itself in a matter of seconds, minimizing the physical damage to its immediate surroundings. Despite its terminology, building implosion also includes the controlled demolition of other structures, such as bridges, smokestacks, towers, and tunnels. Building implosion
Building implosion
(which reduces to seconds a process which could take months or years to achieve by other methods) typically occurs in urban areas and often involves large landmark structures. The actual use of the term "implosion" to refer to the destruction of a building is a misnomer. This had been stated of the destruction of 1515 Tower
Tower
in West Palm Beach, Florida
[...More...]

"Building Implosion" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.