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Drew University
Drew University
Drew University
is a coeducational private university located in Madison, New Jersey, in the United States. Drew has been nicknamed the "University in the City" because of the serenity of its 186-acre (75 ha) urban campus. As of fall 2017, more than 2,000 students were pursuing degrees at the university's three schools.[3] In 1867, financier and railroad tycoon Daniel Drew
Daniel Drew
purchased an estate in Madison to establish a theological seminary to train lads for ministry. The seminary later expanded to offer an undergraduate liberal arts curriculum in 1928 and graduate studies in 1955. The College
College
of Liberal Arts, serving 1,417 undergraduate students, offers strong concentrations in the natural sciences, social sciences, languages and literatures, humanities and the arts, and in several interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary fields
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The Sopranos
The Sopranos
The Sopranos
is an American crime drama television series created by David Chase. The story revolves around fictional New Jersey-based, Italian American
Italian American
mobster Tony Soprano
Tony Soprano
(James Gandolfini). The series portrays the difficulties that he faces as he tries to balance his home life and his criminal organization. These are often highlighted during his therapy sessions with psychiatrist Jennifer Melfi
Jennifer Melfi
(Lorraine Bracco). The series features Tony's family members, mafia colleagues, and rivals in prominent roles and story arcs, most notably his wife Carmela (Edie Falco) and protégé Christopher Moltisanti (Michael Imperioli). The pilot was ordered in 1997, and the show premiered on HBO
HBO
in the United States on January 10, 1999
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Greek Revival Architecture
The Greek Revival was an architectural movement of the late 18th and early 19th centuries, predominantly in Northern Europe and the United States. A product of Hellenism, it may be looked upon as the last phase in the development of Neoclassical architecture. The term was first used by Charles Robert Cockerell
Charles Robert Cockerell
in a lecture he gave as Professor of Architecture to the Royal Academy of Arts, London in 1842.[1] With a newfound access to Greece, or initially the books produced by the few who had actually been able to visit the sites, archaeologist-architects of the period studied the Doric and Ionic orders. In each country it touched, the style was looked on as the expression of local nationalism and civic virtue, and freedom from the lax detail and frivolity that was thought to characterize the architecture of France and Italy, two countries where the style never really took hold
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Liberal Arts College
A liberal arts college is a college with an emphasis on undergraduate study in the liberal arts and sciences. A liberal arts college aims to impart a broad general knowledge and develop general intellectual capacities, in contrast to a professional, vocational, or technical curriculum.[1] Students in a liberal arts college generally major in a particular discipline while receiving exposure to a wide range of academic subjects, including sciences as well as the traditional humanities subjects taught as liberal arts
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Graduate Degree
Postgraduate
Postgraduate
education, or graduate education in North America, involves learning and studying for academic or professional degrees, academic or professional certificates, academic or professional diplomas, or other qualifications for which a first or bachelor's degree generally is required, and it is normally considered to be part of higher education. In North America, this level is generally referred to as graduate school (or sometimes colloquially as grad school). The organization and structure of postgraduate education varies in different countries, as well as in different institutions within countries
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19th Century
The 1 9th century
9th century
was a century that began on January 1, 1801
1801
and ended on December 31, 1900. The 1 9th century
9th century
was a period of social change. Slavery
Slavery
was largely abolished, and the Second Industrial Revolution
Second Industrial Revolution
led to massive urbanization. It was marked by the collapse of the Spanish, Napoleonic, Holy Roman and Mughal empires. This paved the way for the growing influence of the British Empire, the Russian Empire, the United States, the German Empire, the French colonial empire and Meiji Japan, with the British boasting unchallenged dominance after 1815. After the defeat of the French Empire and its allies in the Napoleonic Wars, the British and Russian empires expanded greatly, becoming the world's leading powers. The Russian Empire
Russian Empire
expanded in central and far eastern Asia
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New York City
Bronx, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Queens, Richmond (Staten Island)Historic colonies New Netherland Province of New YorkSettled 1624Consolidated 1898Named for James, Duke of YorkGovernment[2] • Type Mayor–Council • Body New York City
New York City
Council • Mayor Bill de Blasio
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Midtown Manhattan
Midtown Manhattan, or Midtown, represents the central lengthwise portion of the borough and island of Manhattan
Manhattan
in New York City. Midtown is home to some of the city's most iconic buildings, including the Empire State Building, the Chrysler Building, and the headquarters of the United Nations, and it contains world-renowned commercial zones such as Rockefeller Center, Broadway, and Times Square. Midtown Manhattan
Manhattan
is the largest central business district in the world and ranks among the most expensive and intensely used pieces of real estate in the world, and Fifth Avenue
Fifth Avenue
in Midtown Manhattan commands the world's highest retail rents, with average annual rents at US$3,000 per square foot ($32,000/m2) in 2017.[1] While Lower Manhattan
Manhattan
is the main financial center, Midtown is the country's largest commercial, entertainment, and media center
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NJ Transit
New Jersey
New Jersey
Transit Corporation, marketed as NJ Transit
NJ Transit
(NJT; stylized as NJ TRANSIT), is a state-owned public transportation system that serves the US state of New Jersey, along with portions of New York State and Pennsylvania
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Morris & Essex Lines
The Morris & Essex Lines are a group of former Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad railroad lines in New Jersey
New Jersey
now owned and operated by New Jersey
New Jersey
Transit. The lines are so called as much of the right-of-way was constructed by the Morris and Essex Railroad. The lines include service offered on the Morristown Line
Morristown Line
and the Gladstone Branch, and the former Montclair Branch before 2002. Service is available directly to Hoboken Terminal
Hoboken Terminal
or via the Kearny Connection (opened June 10, 1996) to Secaucus Junction
Secaucus Junction
and Penn Station in Midtown Manhattan. The Morristown Line
Morristown Line
runs from Hoboken Terminal
Hoboken Terminal
to Hackettstown, or from New York Penn Station to Dover
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Gibbons V. Ogden
Gibbons v. Ogden, 22 U.S. (9 Wheat.) 1 (1824)[1] was a landmark decision in which the Supreme Court of the United States
Supreme Court of the United States
held that the power to regulate interstate commerce, granted to Congress by the Commerce Clause
Commerce Clause
of the United States Constitution, encompassed the power to regulate navigation.[2] The case was argued by some of America's most admired and capable attorneys at the time. Exiled Irish patriot Thomas Addis Emmet
Thomas Addis Emmet
and Thomas J. Oakley
Thomas J. Oakley
argued for Ogden, while U.S. Attorney General William Wirt and Daniel Webster
Daniel Webster
argued for Gibbons.Contents1 Background 2 Case 3 Decision of the U.S. Supreme Court 4 Opinion excerpts 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksBackground[edit] In 1808[3] the Legislature of the State of New York granted to Robert R
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Antebellum Architecture
Antebellum architecture
Antebellum architecture
(meaning "prewar", from the Latin ante, "before", and bellum, "war") is the neoclassical architectural style characteristic of the 19th-century Southern United States, especially the Deep South, from after the birth of the United States
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Theological Seminary
Seminary, school of theology, theological seminary, and divinity school are educational institutions for educating students (sometimes called seminarians) in theology, generally to prepare them for ordination as clergy, academia, or ministry.[1] The English word is taken from the Latin seminarium, translated as seed-bed, an image taken from the Council of Trent
Council of Trent
document Cum adolescentium aetas which called for the first modern seminaries.[2] In the West, the term now refers to Roman Catholic educational institutes and has widened to include other Christian denominations and American Jewish institutions.[3][
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Financier
An investor is a person that allocates capital with the expectation of a future financial return.[1] Types of investments include: equity, debt securities, real estate, currency, commodity, token, derivatives such as put and call options, futures, forwards, etc. This definition makes no distinction between those in the primary and secondary markets. That is, someone who provides a business with capital and someone who buys a stock are both investors
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Railroad
Rail transport
Rail transport
is a means of transferring of passengers and goods on wheeled vehicles running on rails, also known as tracks. It is also commonly referred to as train transport. In contrast to road transport, where vehicles run on a prepared flat surface, rail vehicles (rolling stock) are directionally guided by the tracks on which they run. Tracks usually consist of steel rails, installed on ties (sleepers) and ballast, on which the rolling stock, usually fitted with metal wheels, moves
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Tycoon
A business magnate (formally industrialist) refers to an entrepreneur of great influence, importance, or standing in a particular enterprise or field of business. The term characteristically refers to a wealthy entrepreneur or investor who controls, through personal business ownership or dominant shareholding position, a firm or industry whose goods or services are widely consumed
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