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Draupadi
Draupadi
Draupadi
(Sanskrit: द्रौपदी, Sanskrit pronunciation: [d̪rəʊpəd̪i]) is one of the most important female characters in the Hindu epic, Mahabharata.[1][2][3][4] According to the epic, she is the daughter of Drupada, King of Panchala. Draupadi
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Neelakantha Chaturdhara
Neelakantha Chaturdhara
Neelakantha Chaturdhara
(Sanskrit: नीलकण्ठ चतुर्धर, IAST: Nīlakaṇṭha Caturdhara) was a scholar who lived in Varanasi
Varanasi
in the later half of the 17th century, famous for his commentary on the Mahabharata.[1]Contents1 Life 2 Mahabharata
Mahabharata
commentary 3 References 4 Further readingLife[edit] As with most scholars of pre-modern India, little is known of his life. He was from a Marathi-speaking Brahmin family that had been established in a town on the banks of the river Godavari
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Hindu Epic
DivisionsSamhita Brahmana Aranyaka UpanishadsUpanishads Rig vedicAitareya KaushitakiSama vedicChandogya KenaYajur vedicBrihadaranyaka Isha Taittiriya Katha Shvetashvatara MaitriAtharva vedicMundaka Mandukya PrashnaOther scripturesBhagavad Gita AgamasRelated Hindu textsVedangasShiksha Chandas Vyakarana Nirukta Kalpa JyotishaPuranas Brahma puranasBrahma Brahmānda Brahmavaivarta Markandeya BhavishyaVaishnava puranasVishnu Bhagavata Naradiya Garuda Padma Vamana Kurma MatsyaShaiva puranasShiva Linga Skanda Vayu AgniItihasaRamayana MahabharataShastras and sutrasDharma Shastra Artha Śastra Kamasutra Brahma Sutras Samkhya Sutras Mimamsa Sutras Nyāya Sūtras Vaiśeṣika Sūtra Yoga Sutras
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Vishnu Sitaram Sukthankar
Vishnu Sitaram Sukthankar, also known as V. S. Sukthankar, (4 May 1887 – 21 January 1943) was an eminent Indologist and scholar of Sanskrit. He is principally known as the General Editor of the Critical Edition of the Mahabharata
Mahabharata
published by the Bhandarkar Oriental Research Institute in Pune, India.Contents1 Early life 2 Education 3 Work 4 ReferencesEarly life[edit] Vishnu Sitaram Sukthankar was born on 4 May 1887 to Sitaram Sukthankar, his father, a civil engineer, and Dhaklibai, his mother. He married Eleanor Bowing (1889-1927) on 29 July 1908. Their children were John (1908), Kathleen (1912) and Maurice (1913). Education[edit] Sukthankar was educated at the Maratha High School and later at St. Xavier's College in Bombay. After passing his Intermediate Examination, he left for England and studied mathematics during the years 1903-1906 at St. John’s College, Cambridge
St

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Shloka
Shloka (Sanskrit: श्लोक śloka; meaning "song", from the root śru, "hear"[1]) is a category of verse line developed from the Vedic Anustubh poetic meter. It is the basis for Indian epic verse, and may be considered the Indian verse form par excellence, occurring, as it does, far more frequently than any other meter in classical Sanskrit
Sanskrit
poetry.[1] The Mahabharata
Mahabharata
and Ramayana, for example, are written almost exclusively in shlokas.[2] The traditional view is that this form of verse was involuntarily composed by Valmiki
Valmiki
in grief, the author of the Ramayana, on seeing a hunter shoot down one of two birds in love.[3] The shloka is treated as a couplet. Each hemistich (half-verse) of 16 syllables, composed of two Pādas of eight syllables, can take either a pathyā ("normal") form or one of several vipulā ("extended") forms
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Bhandarkar Oriental Research Institute
The Bhandarkar Oriental Research Institute
Bhandarkar Oriental Research Institute
(BORI) is located in Pune, Maharashtra, India.[1] It was founded on July 6, 1917 and named after Dr. Ramakrishna Gopal Bhandarkar
Ramakrishna Gopal Bhandarkar
(1837–1925), long regarded as the founder of Indology (Orientalism) in India. The institute is well known for its collection of old Sanskrit
Sanskrit
and Prakrit
Prakrit
manuscripts.Contents1 The Institute 2 The manuscript collection 3 The Critical Edition of the Mahabharata 4 Vandalism in 2004 5 References 6 External linksThe Institute[edit] This institute is of a public trust registered under Act XXI of 1860. Initially, the institute received an annual grant of 3000 Rupees from the Government of Bombay. Presently, it is partially supported by annual grants from the Government of Maharashtra
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Sarala Das
Sarala Dasa
Sarala Dasa
or Sarala Das
Sarala Das
was a 15th-century poet and scholar of Odia literature. Best known for three Odia books — Mahabharata, Vilanka Ramayana and Chandi Purana — he was the first scholar to write in Odia. As an originator of Odia literature, his work has formed an enduring source of information for succeeding generations.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 References 4 External linksLife[edit] The life of Sarala Dasa
Sarala Dasa
is obscure. He was born at Kanakavati Patana, known as Kanakapura, one of the Sidhikshetras in Jagatsinghpur District. Though the date of his birth cannot be accurately determined, he can safely be placed to the 15th century AD. Sarala Dasa
Sarala Dasa
had no systematic early education, and what he achieved through self-education was attributed to the grace of Sarala, goddess of devotion and inspiration
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Razmnama
The Razmnāma (Book of War) (رزم نامہ) is a Persian translation of the Mahabharata. In Persian, “Razm” means “war” and "nama" means “tale” or “epic”; the name Razmnamah, therefore, means a tale of war. In 1574 Akbar
Akbar
started a Maktab Khana or a house of translation works in Fatehpur Sikri
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Brahmin
ArtsBharatanatyam Kathak Kathakali Kuchipudi Manipuri Mohiniyattam Odissi Sattriya Bhagavata Mela Yakshagana Dandiya Raas Carnatic musicRites of passageGarbhadhana Pumsavana Simantonayana Jatakarma Namakarana Nishkramana Annaprashana Chudakarana Karnavedha Vidyarambha Upanayana Keshanta Ritushuddhi Samavartana Vivaha AntyeshtiAshrama DharmaAshrama: Brahmacharya Grihastha Vanaprastha SannyasaFestivalsDiwali Holi Shivaratri Navaratri Durga
Durga
Puja Ramlila Vijayadashami-DussehraRaksha Bandhan Ganesh Chat
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Putrakameshti
Putrakameshti
Putrakameshti
is a special Yajna
Yajna
performed in Hinduism
Hinduism
for the sake of having a male child/son. It is a kaamya-karma. In the ancient Indian epic Ramayana, upon the recommendation of Sage Vashishta, King Dasharatha
Dasharatha
of Ayodhya
Ayodhya
performed the Putrakameshti Yajna
Yajna
under the supervision of Rishishringa Muni, who was an expert in Yajurveda, which has the guidelines for this prayer
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Crown Prince
A crown prince is the male heir apparent to the throne in a royal or imperial monarchy. Its female form is crown princess, which may refer either to an heir apparent or, especially in earlier times, the wife of the person styled crown prince.[citation needed] Crown prince
Crown prince
as a descriptive term has been used throughout history for the prince being first in line to a throne and is expected to succeed (i.e. the heir apparent) barring any unforeseen future event preventing this. In certain monarchies, a more specific substantive title may be accorded and become associated with the position of heir apparent (e.g. Prince of Asturias
Prince of Asturias
in Spain, Prince of Wales
Prince of Wales
in the United Kingdom)
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Kashiram Das
Kashiram das (কাশীরাম দাস, born 16th century) is an important poet in medieval Bengali literature. His Bengali re-telling of the Mahabharata, known as Kashidasi Mahabharat, is a popular and influential version of the Mahabharata legend in Bengal. Although the entire work is intra-textually ascribed to him, most scholars agree that he composed only the first four of the eighteen books (parvas). As with the Ramayana of Krittibas Ojha, Kashiram freely removed elements and added other legends to the story. Das is not a last name, but a title meaning "servant" in the Vaishnava tradition; the name is also written as Kashiramdas.[1] Life[edit] Kashiram Das was born to a Vaishnava Kayastha family in the village of Singi, adjacent to Katwa in Bardhaman district; his death anniversary is still observed in the region. Kashiram was the second son of Kamalakanta Das;[2] two of his brothers were noted poets on their own, in the Vaishnava Padavali tradition
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Yajna
Yajna
Yajna
(IAST: yajña) literally means "sacrifice, devotion, worship, offering", and refers in Hinduism
Hinduism
to any ritual done in front of a sacred fire, often with mantras.[1] Yajna
Yajna
has been a Vedic tradition, described in a layer of Vedic literature called Brahmanas, as well as Yajurveda.[2] The tradition has evolved from offering oblations and libations into sacred fire to symbolic offerings in the presence of sacred fire (Agni).[1] Yajna
Yajna
rituals-related texts have been called the Karma-kanda (ritual works) portion of the Vedic literature, in contrast to Jnana-kanda (knowledge) portion contained in the Vedic Upanishads
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Sanskrit Language
A few attempts at revival have been reported in Indian and Nepalese newspapers. India: 14,135 Indians claimed Sanskrit
Sanskrit
to be their mother tongue in the 2001 Census of India:[2] Nepal: 1,669 Nepalis
Nepalis
in 2011
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Rajasuya
Rajasuya
Rajasuya
(Imperial Sacrifice or the king's inauguration sacrifice) is a Śrauta
Śrauta
ritual of the Vedic religion. It is a consecration of a king.[1] Broad outline[edit] The Rajasuya
Rajasuya
is a Śrauta
Śrauta
ritual of the Vedic religion. It is a consecration of a king.[1] It is described in the Taittiriya corpus, including Apastamba Srauta Sutra 18.8–25.22.[1] It involves soma pressing, a chariot drive, the king shooting arrows from his bow, and a brief cattle “raid.”[1] There is a telling of the tale of Shunahshepa, a boy who was nearly sacrificed to Varuna
Varuna
on behalf of the sonless king Harishchandra.[1] Also included is a game of throwing dice by which the king is enthroned and the cosmos is regenerated.[1] References[edit]^ a b c d e f Knipe 2015, p. 237.Sources[edit]Knipe, David M
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Parcheesi
Parcheesi is a brand-name American adaptation of the Indian cross and circle board game Pachisi, published by Parker Brothers[1] and Winning Moves.Contents1 Equipment 2 Setup 3 Rules3.1 Gameplay 3.2 Rewards of extra moves 3.3 Winning the game4 ReferencesEquipment[edit] Parcheesi is typically played with two dice, four pieces per player and a board with a track around the outside, four corner spaces and four home paths leading to a central end space. The most popular Parcheesi boards in America have 68 spaces around the edge of the board, 12 of which are darkened safe spaces. Each corner of the board contains one player's nest, or starting area. Setup[edit]Each player positions their four single colored pieces in the round starting nest of the same color.[1] Each player rolls a single die to determine player order
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