HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Dralion
Dralion
Dralion
(pronounced Drah-lee-on) was a touring production by the Canadian entertainment company Cirque du Soleil. The show combined elements of traditional Chinese circus with Western contemporary circus, complementing the "East-meets-West" theme implied in the title — the name is a portmanteau of "dragon" (representing the East) and "lion" (representing the West)
[...More...]

"Dralion" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bamboo
The bamboos /bæmˈbuː/ ( listen) are evergreen perennial flowering plants in the subfamily Bambusoideae of the grass family Poaceae. In bamboo, as in other grasses, the internodal regions of the stem are usually hollow and the vascular bundles in the cross section are scattered throughout the stem instead of in a cylindrical arrangement. The dicotyledonous woody xylem is also absent. The absence of secondary growth wood causes the stems of monocots, including the palms and large bamboos, to be columnar rather than tapering.[3] Bamboos include some of the fastest-growing plants in the world,[4] due to a unique rhizome-dependent system. Certain species of bamboo can grow 91 cm (36 in) within a 24-hour period, at a rate of almost 4 cm (1.6 in) an hour (a growth around 1 mm every 90 seconds, or 1 inch every 40 minutes).[5] Giant bamboos are the largest members of the grass family
[...More...]

"Bamboo" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lion Dance
Lion
Lion
dance (simplified Chinese: 舞狮; traditional Chinese: 舞獅; pinyin: wǔshī) is a form of traditional dance in Chinese culture
Chinese culture
and other Asian countries in which performers mimic a lion's movements in a lion costume to bring good luck and fortune. The lion dance is usually performed during the Chinese New Year
Chinese New Year
and other Chinese traditional, cultural and religious festivals. It may also be performed at important occasions such as business opening events, special celebrations or wedding ceremonies, or may be used to honour special guests by the Chinese communities. The Chinese lion dance is sometimes mistakenly referred to as dragon dance by most first timers. An easy way to tell the difference is that a lion is normally operated by just two dancers and has a tail, while a dragon is longer and needs many people holding a stick
[...More...]

"Lion Dance" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ballet
Ballet
Ballet
/ˈbæleɪ/ (French: [balɛ]) is a type of performance dance that originated during the Italian Renaissance
Italian Renaissance
in the 15th century and later developed into a concert dance form in France and Russia. It has since become a widespread, highly technical form of dance with its own vocabulary based on French terminology. It has been globally influential and has defined the foundational techniques used in many other dance genres and cultures. Ballet
Ballet
has been taught in various schools around the world, which have historically incorporated their own cultures to evolve the art. See glossary of ballet. A ballet, a work, consists of the choreography and music for a ballet production
[...More...]

"Ballet" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Teeterboard
The teeterboard (or Korean plank) is an acrobatic apparatus that resembles a playground seesaw. The strongest teeterboards are made of oak (usually 9 feet in length). The board is divided in the middle by a fulcrum made of welded steel. At each end of the board is a square padded area, where a performer stands on an incline before being catapulted into the air. The well-trained flyer performs various aerial somersaults, landing on padded mats, a human pyramid, a specialized landing chair, stilts, or even a Russian bar. The teeterboard is manned by a team of flyers, catchers, spotters and pushers. Some members of the team perform more than one acrobatic role
[...More...]

"Teeterboard" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Aerial Straps
Straps, also known as aerial straps, are a type of aerial apparatus on which various feats of strength and flexibility may be performed, often in the context of a circus performance. It is a cotton or nylon web apparatus that looks like two suspended ribbons. By wrapping the strap ends around hands and wrists, the performer performs holds, twists, rolls and manoeuvres, requiring extreme strength and precision similar men’s rings in gymnastics. Straps are available in various configurations, including those with various types of loops at the ends and those without loops
[...More...]

"Aerial Straps" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Contortion
Contortion
Contortion
(sometimes contortionism) is a performance art in which performers, contortionists, showcase their skills of extreme physical flexibility. Contortion
Contortion
acts often accompany acrobatics, circus acts, street performers and other live performing arts. Contortion
Contortion
acts are typically performed in front of a live audience. An act will showcase one or more artists performing a choreographed set of moves or poses, often to music, which require extreme flexibility. The physical flexibility required to perform such acts greatly exceeds that of the general population
[...More...]

"Contortion" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jump Rope
A skipping rope (British English) or jump rope (American English) is a tool used in the sport of jump rope where one or more participants jump over a rope swung so that it passes under their feet and over their heads. There are multiple subsets of jump rope including: single freestyle, single speed, pairs, three person speed (double dutch), and three person freestyle (double dutch freestyle). The events are often separated by gender and age. There are hundreds of competitive teams all around the world. There are a few major organisations that support jump rope as a sport as seen below, schools rarely have jump rope teams, and states do not sanction official events for high school or elementary school. In freestyle events, jumpers use a variety of basic and advanced techniques in a routine of one minute, which is judged by a head judge, content judges, and performance judges
[...More...]

"Jump Rope" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Aerial Silk
Aerial silks (also known as aerial contortion, aerial ribbons, aerial tissues, fabric, ribbon, or tissu, depending on personal preference)[citation needed] is a type of performance in which one or more artists perform aerial acrobatics while hanging from a fabric. The fabric may be hung as two pieces, or a single piece, folded to make a loop, classified as hammock silks. Performers climb the suspended fabric without the use of safety lines, and rely only on their training and skill to ensure safety. They use the fabric to wrap, suspend, fall, swing, and spiral their bodies into and out of various positions. Aerial silks may be used to fly through the air, striking poses and figures while flying
[...More...]

"Aerial Silk" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Foot-juggling
A Risley or Risley act (also antipode or antipodism) is any circus acrobalance posture where the base is lying down on their back, supporting one or more flyers with their hands, feet and/or other parts of the body; spinning a person or object using only one's feet. The act is named after Richard Risley Carlisle (1814–1874) who developed this kind of act in the United States.[1] Risleys can be separated into three general categories of skills:Skills that are based with the hands Skills that are based with the feet OtherRisley skills[edit]Easy Chair Front Hang Back Hang Foot-to-Foot stand Hand-to-Foot stand Jackknife Horizontal Shoulder Stand (aka Candlestick) Modified Shoulder Stand (hands on arms)[citation needed]See also[edit]Acroyoga Professor Risley and the Imperial Japanese TroupeReferences[edit]^ "Risley act", Merriam-Webster.com
[...More...]

"Foot-juggling" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Aerial Hoop
The aerial hoop (also known as the lyra, aerial ring or cerceau/cerceaux) is a circular steel apparatus (resembling a hula hoop) suspended from the ceiling, on which circus artists may perform aerial acrobatics. It can be used static, spinning, or swinging.[1] Tabs are the connection points where the aerial hoop attaches to the rigging. Most aerial hoops connect at either one point (single tab configuration) or two points (double tab configuration). The number of tabs an aerial hoop has will depend on how it will be used, the intended effect, and the performer's comfort level. - Double tab hoops hung from two points (at equal or wider spacing as the tabs on the hoop) will swing like a trapeze (or a child's swing) and do not spin. - Double tab hoops connected to a single aerial point, the hoop can spin and swing in a multi axis plane i.e
[...More...]

"Aerial Hoop" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Medusa
In Greek mythology, Medusa
Medusa
(/məˈdjuːzə, məˈdʒuː-, -sə/, US: /məˈduː-/; Μέδουσα "guardian, protectress")[1] was a monster, a Gorgon, generally described as a winged human female with living venomous snakes in place of hair. Gazers upon her face would turn to stone. Most sources describe her as the daughter of Phorcys and Ceto,[2] though the author Hyginus makes her the daughter of Gorgon
Gorgon
and Ceto.[3] According to Hesiod
Hesiod
and Aeschylus, she lived and died on an island named Sarpedon, somewhere near Cisthene
[...More...]

"Medusa" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Trampoline
A trampoline is a device consisting of a piece of taut, strong fabric stretched between a steel frame using many coiled springs
[...More...]

"Trampoline" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Juggling
Juggling
Juggling
is a physical skill, performed by a juggler, involving the manipulation of objects for recreation, entertainment, art or sport. The most recognizable form of juggling is toss juggling. Juggling
Juggling
can be the manipulation of one object or many objects at the same time, using one or many hands. Jugglers often refer to the objects they juggle as props. The most common props are balls, clubs, or rings. Some jugglers use more dramatic objects such as knives, fire torches or chainsaws
[...More...]

"Juggling" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Percussion
A percussion instrument is a musical instrument that is sounded by being struck or scraped by a beater (including attached or enclosed beaters or rattles); struck, scraped or rubbed by hand; or struck against another similar instrument. The percussion family is believed to include the oldest musical instruments, following the human voice.[1] The percussion section of an orchestra most commonly contains instruments such as timpani, snare drum, bass drum, cymbals, triangle and tambourine. However, the section can also contain non-percussive instruments, such as whistles and sirens, or a blown conch shell. Percussive techniques can also be applied to the human body, as in body percussion
[...More...]

"Percussion" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Handstand
A handstand is the act of supporting the body in a stable, inverted vertical position by balancing on the hands. In a basic handstand the body is held straight with arms and legs fully extended, with hands spaced approximately shoulder-width apart. There are many variations of handstands, but in all cases a handstand performer must possess adequate balance and upper body strength. Handstands are performed in many athletic activities, including acro dance, cheerleading, circus, yoga, and gymnastics. Some variation of handstand is performed on every gymnastic apparatus, and many tumbling skills pass through a handstand position during their execution. Breakdancers incorporate handstands in freezes and kicks. Armstand dives—a category found in competitive platform diving—are dives that begin with a handstand. In games or contests, swimmers perform underwater handstands with their legs and feet extended above the water. Handstands are known by various other names
[...More...]

"Handstand" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.