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Dracula
Dracula
Dracula
is an 1897 Gothic horror
Gothic horror
novel by Irish author Bram Stoker
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Arthur Conan Doyle
Sir
Sir
Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle KStJ DL (22 May 1859 – 7 July 1930) was a British writer best known for his detective fiction featuring the character Sherlock Holmes. Originally a physician, in 1887 he published A Study in Scarlet, the first of four novels about Holmes and Dr. Watson. In addition, Doyle wrote over fifty short stories featuring the famous detective. The Sherlock Holmes
Sherlock Holmes
stories are generally considered milestones in the field of crime fiction. Doyle was a prolific writer; his non-Sherlockian works include fantasy and science fiction stories about Professor Challenger
Professor Challenger
and humorous stories about the Napoleonic soldier Brigadier Gerard, as well as plays, romances, poetry, non-fiction and historical novels. One of Doyle's early short stories, "J
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Blood Transfusion
Blood
Blood
transfusion is generally the process of receiving blood or blood products into one's circulation intravenously. Transfusions
Transfusions
are used for various medical conditions to replace lost components of the blood
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Wolf
refer Subspecies
Subspecies
of Canis
Canis
lupusHistorical (red + green) and modern (green) range of wild subspecies of C. lupusThe gray wolf ( Canis
Canis
lupus),[a] also known as the timber wolf[3][4] or western wolf,[b] is a canine native to the wilderness and remote areas of Eurasia
Eurasia
and North America
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Decapitation
Decapitation
Decapitation
is the complete separation of the head from the body. Such an injury is usually fatal to humans and most animals, since it deprives all other organs of the involuntary functions that are needed for the body to function, while the brain is deprived of oxygenated blood. The term beheading refers to the act of deliberately decapitating a person, either as a means of murder or execution; it may be accomplished with an axe, sword, knife, or by mechanical means such as a guillotine. An executioner who carries out executions by beheading is called a headsman.[1] Accidental decapitation can be the result of an explosion,[2] car or industrial accident,[note 1] improperly administered execution by hanging or other violent injury
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Budapest
Budapest
Budapest
(Hungarian: [ˈbudɒpɛʃt] ( listen))[11] is the capital and the most populous city of Hungary, and one of the largest cities in the European Union.[12][13][14] With an estimated 2016 population of 1,759,407 distributed over a land area of about 525 square kilometres (203 square miles), Budapest
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Logbook
A logbook (a ship's logs or simply log) is a record of important events in the management, operation, and navigation of a ship. It is essential to traditional navigation, and must be filled in at least daily. The term originally referred to a book for recording readings from the chip log that was used to estimate a ship's speed through the water. Today's ship's log has grown to contain many other types of information, and is a record of operational data relating to a ship or submarine, such as weather conditions, times of routine events and significant incidents, crew complement or what ports were docked at and when. The term logbook has spread to a wide variety of other usages. Today, a virtual or electronic logbook is typically used for record-keeping for complex machines such as nuclear plants or particle accelerators. In military terms, a logbook is a series of official and legally binding documents
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H. G. Wells
Herbert George Wells[3][4] (21 September 1866 – 13 August 1946), usually referred to as H. G. Wells, was an English writer. He was prolific in many genres, writing dozens of novels, short stories, and works of social commentary, satire, biography, and autobiography, including even two books on war games. He is now best remembered for his science fiction novels and is often called a "father of science fiction", along with Jules Verne
Jules Verne
and Hugo Gernsback.[5][6][a] During his own lifetime, however, he was most prominent as a forward-looking, even prophetic social critic who devoted his literary talents to the development of a progressive vision on a global scale. A futurist, he wrote a number of utopian works and foresaw the advent of airplanes, tanks, space travel, nuclear weapons, satellite television and something resembling the World Wide Web.[7] His science fiction imagined time travel, alien invasion, invisibility, and biological engineering
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Real Estate
Real estate
Real estate
is "property consisting of land and the buildings on it, along with its natural resources such as crops, minerals or water; immovable property of this nature; an interest vested in this (also) an item of real property, (more generally) buildings or housing in general. Also: the business of real estate; the profession of buying, selling, or renting land, buildings, or housing."[1] It is a legal term used in jurisdictions whose legal system is derived from English common law, such as India, the United Kingdom, United States, Canada, Pakistan, Australia, and New Zealand.Contents1 Residential real estate 2 Sales and marketing 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksResidential real estate Residential real estate may contain either a single family or multifamily structure that is available for occupation or for non-business purposes.[2] Residences can be classified by if and how they are connected to neighbouring residences and land
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Moldavia
Moldavia
Moldavia
(Romanian: Moldova, pronounced [molˈdova] ( listen) or Țara Moldovei (in Romanian Latin alphabet), Цара Мѡлдовєй (in old Romanian Cyrillic alphabet)) is a historical region and former principality in Eastern Europe, corresponding to the territory between the Eastern Carpathians and the Dniester
Dniester
River. An initially independent and later autonomous state, it existed from the 14th century to 1859, when it united with Wallachia
Wallachia
(Țara Românească) as the basis of the modern Romanian state; at various times, Moldavia
Moldavia
included the regions of Bessarabia
Bessarabia
(with the Budjak), all of Bukovina
Bukovina
and Hertza
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Bukovina
Bukovina
Bukovina
(Romanian: Bucovina; German: Bukowina/Buchenland; Polish: Bukowina; Hungarian: Bukovina, Ukrainian: Буковина Bukovyna; see also other languages) is a historical region in Central Europe,[1][2] divided between Romania
Romania
and Ukraine, located on the northern slopes of the central Eastern Carpathians and the adjoining plains. A region of Moldavia
Moldavia
during the Middle Ages, the territory of what became known as Bukovina
Bukovina
was, from 1774 to 1918, an administrative division of the Habsburg Monarchy, the Austrian Empire, and Austria-Hungary. After World War I, Romania
Romania
established its control over Bukovina
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Carpathian Mountains
The Carpathian Mountains
Carpathian Mountains
or Carpathians (/kɑːrˈpeɪθiənz/) are a mountain range system forming an arc roughly 1,500 km (932 mi) long across Central and Eastern Europe, making them the second-longest mountain range in Europe
Europe
(after the Scandinavian Mountains, 1,700 km (1,0
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Solicitor
A solicitor is a legal practitioner who traditionally deals with most of the legal matters in some jurisdictions. A person must have legally-defined qualifications, which vary from one jurisdiction to another, to be described as a solicitor and enabled to practise there as such. For example, in England and Wales
England and Wales
a solicitor is admitted to practise under the provisions of the Solicitors Act 1974. With some exceptions, practising solicitors must possess a practising certificate. There are many more solicitors than barristers in England; they undertake the general aspects of giving legal advice and conducting legal proceedings.[1] In the United Kingdom, a few Australian states, Hong Kong, South Africa (where they are called attorneys) and Ireland, the legal profession is split between solicitors and barristers (called advocates in some countries), and a lawyer will usually only hold one of the two titles
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Sacramental Bread
Sacramental bread
Sacramental bread
(Latin: hostia, Italian: ostia), sometimes called altar bread, Communion bread, the Lamb or simply the host, is the bread or wafer used in the Christian
Christian
ritual of the Eucharist. Eastern and Western traditions both require that it be made from wheat. Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
theology generally teaches that at the Words of Institution the bread is changed into the Body of Christ
Body of Christ
(see transubstantiation), whereas Eastern Christian
Christian
theology generally views the epiclesis as the point at which the change occurs
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Diary
A diary is a record (originally in handwritten format) with discrete entries arranged by date reporting on what has happened over the course of a day or other period. A personal diary may include a person's experiences, and/or thoughts or feelings, including comments on current events outside the writer's direct experience. Someone who keeps a diary is known as a diarist. Diaries undertaken for institutional purposes play a role in many aspects of human civilization, including government records (e.g. Hansard), business ledgers and military records. In British English, the word may also denote a preprinted journal format. Today the term is generally employed for personal diaries, normally intended to remain private or to have a limited circulation amongst friends or relatives
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Romani People
The Romani (also spelled Romany /ˈroʊməni/, /ˈrɒ-/), or Roma, are a traditionally itinerant ethnic group, living mostly in Europe
Europe
and the Americas and originating from the northern Indian subcontinent,[55][56][57] from the Rajasthan, Haryana, Punjab
Punjab
and
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