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Double Ninth Festival
The Double Ninth Festival
Double Ninth Festival
(Chung Yeung Festival in Hong Kong, Chōyō (Japanese: 重陽), Vietnamese: Tết Trùng Cửu), observed on the ninth day of the ninth month in the Chinese calendar, is a traditional Chinese holiday, mentioned in writing since before the East Han
East Han
period (before AD 25). The day is also known as the Chrysanthemum
Chrysanthemum
Festival (菊の節句) in Japan.[1] According to the I Ching, nine is a yang number; the ninth day of the ninth lunar month (or double nine) has too much yang (a traditional Chinese spiritual concept) and is thus a potentially dangerous date. Hence, the day is also called "Double Yang Festival" (重陽節). To protect against danger, it is customary to climb a high mountain, drink chrysanthemum liquor, and wear the zhuyu (茱萸) plant, Cornus officinalis
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Yin And Yang
Model humanity:Xian ZhenrenWen and wuPracticesFenxiang JingxiangFeng shui MiaohuiWu shamanismJitong mediumshipPrecious scrollsInstitutions and templesAssociations of good-doingLineage associations or churchesChinese temple Ancestral shrineChinese Folk Temples' AssociationFestivalsQingming Zhongyuan Zhongqiu Jiuhuangye Qixi Duanwu NianInternal traditions Major cultural formsChinese ancestral religionChinese communal deity religionChinese mother goddess worshipNortheast China
China
fol
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Lunar Month
In lunar calendars, a lunar month is the time between two successive syzygies (new moons or full moons). The use of the lunar month varies by which culture has utilized the method, the main difference being when the "new" month begins. This article deals with the definitions of a 'month' that are mainly of significance in astronomy. For other definitions, including a description of a month in the calendars of different cultures around the world, see: month.Contents1 Variations 2 Terminology2.1 Sidereal month 2.2 Synodic month 2.3 Tropical month 2.4 Anomalistic month 2.5 Draconic month3 Cycle lengths 4 See also 5 ReferencesVariations[edit] In Shona, Middle-Eastern, and European traditions, the month starts when the young crescent moon becomes first visible at evening after conjunction with the Sun one or two days before that evening (e.g., in the Islamic calendar)
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Vietnamese Language
Vietnamese /viˌɛtnəˈmiːz/ ( listen) (Tiếng Việt) is a Viet–Muong language that originated in the north of modern-day Vietnam, where it is the national and official language. It is the native language of the Vietnamese (Kinh) people, as well as a first or second language for the many ethnic minorities of Vietnam. As the result of Vietnamese emigration and cultural influence, Vietnamese speakers are found throughout the world, notably in East and Southeast Asia, North America, Australia and Western Europe. Vietnamese has also been officially recognized as a minority language in the Czech Republic. It is part of the Austroasiatic language family of which it has by far the most speakers (several times as many as the other Austroasiatic languages combined).[6] Vietnamese vocabulary has borrowings from Chinese, and it formerly used a modified set of Chinese characters called chữ nôm given vernacular pronunciation
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The Free Dictionary
TheFreeDictionary.com is an American online dictionary and encyclopedia that gathers information from a variety of sources.Contents1 Content 2 Site operator 3 Mirroring 4 TheFreeLibrary.com 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksContent[edit] The site cross-references the contents of The American Heritage Dictionary
Dictionary
of the English Language, the Columbia Encyclopedia, the Computer Desktop Encyclopedia, the Hutchinson Encyclopedia (subscription) and, as well as the Acronym Finder database, several financial dictionaries, legal dictionaries and other content.[4] It has a feature that allows a user to preview an article while positioning the mouse cursor over a link
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Qixi Festival
The Qixi Festival
Qixi Festival
(Chinese: 七夕节), also known as the Qiqiao Festival (乞巧节), is a Chinese festival that celebrates the annual meeting of the cowherd and weaver girl in Chinese mythology.[1] It falls on the 7th day of the 7th month on the Chinese calendar.[2][3] It is sometimes called the Double Seventh Festival,[4] the Chinese Valentine's Day,[5] the Night o
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East Han
Coordinates: 34°09′21″N 108°56′47″E / 34.15583°N 108.94639°E / 34.15583; 108.94639Han dynasty漢朝202 BC–9 AD; 25 AD–220 ADA map of the Western Han Dynasty in 2 AD: 1) the territory shaded in dark blue represents the principalities and centrally-administered commanderies of the Han Empire; 2) the light blue area shows the extent of the Tarim Basin protectorate of the Western Regions.[1]Capital Chang'an (206 BC–9 AD, 190–195 AD) Luoyang (23–190 AD, 196 AD) Xuchang (196–220 AD)Languages Old ChineseReligion Taoism,Chinese folk religionGovernment MonarchyEmperor •  202–195 BC (first) Emperor Gaozu •  141-87 BC Emperor Wu •  25–57 AD Emperor Guangwu •  189-220 AD (last) Emperor XianChancellor •  206–193 BC Xiao He •  193–190 BC Cao Can •  189–192
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I Ching
The I Ching
I Ching
(/ˈiː ˈdʒɪŋ/),[2] also known as Classic of Changes or Book
Book
of Changes, is an ancient Chinese divination text and the oldest of the Chinese classics. Possessing a history of more than two and a half millennia of commentary and interpretation, the I Ching
I Ching
is an influential text read throughout the world, providing inspiration to the worlds of religion, psychoanalysis, business, literature, and art
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Han Chinese
The Han Chinese, Han people[27][28][29] or simply Han[28][29][30] (/hɑːn/;[31] Mandarin: [xân]; Han characters: 漢人 (Mandarin pinyin: Hànrén; literally "Han people"[32]) or 漢族 (pinyin: Hànzú; literally "Han ethnicity"[33] or "Han ethnic group"[34])) are an East Asian ethnic group and nation.[35] They constitute the world's largest ethnic group, making up about 18% of the global population. The estimated 1.3 billion Han Chinese
Han Chinese
are mostly concentrated in Mainland China, where they make up about 92% of the total population.[2] The
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Liquor
A distilled beverage, spirit, liquor, hard liquor or hard alcohol is an alcoholic beverage produced by distillation of liquid drinks made with grains, fruit, or vegetables that have already gone through alcoholic fermentation. The distillation process purifies the liquid and removes diluting components like water, for the purpose of increasing its proportion of alcohol content (commonly expressed as alcohol by volume, ABV).[1] As distilled beverages contain significantly more alcohol, they are considered "harder" – in North America, the term hard liquor is used to distinguish distilled beverages from undistilled ones. As examples, this term does not include beverages such as beer, wine, mead, sake, or cider, as they are fermented but not distilled. These all have a relatively low alcohol content, typically less than 15%. Brandy
Brandy
is a spirit produced by the distillation of wine, and has an ABV of over 35%
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Kyoto
Kyoto
Kyoto
(京都市, Kyōto-shi, pronounced [kʲoːꜜto] ( listen), pronounced [kʲoːtoꜜɕi] ( listen); UK: /kɪˈoʊtoʊ/, US: /kiˈoʊ-/, or /ˈkjoʊ-/[4]) is a city located in the central part of the island of Honshu, Japan. It has a population close to 1.5 million
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Cornus Officinalis
Cornus
Cornus
officinalis is a species of dogwood known also as Japanese cornel or Japanese cornelian cherry or Cornelian cherries, not to be confused with C. mas, which is also known as the "Cornelian cherry." The correct term would be Korean cornel dogwood or Chinese cornel dogwood since the flower originated from Korea and China.Contents1 Etymology 2 Traditional medicine 3 Chemical constituents 4 Nutrition 5 Gallery 6 References 7 External linksEtymology[edit] In Korean it is known as sansuyu (산수유), in Chinese as shān zhū yú (山茱萸) and in Japanese as sanshuyu (サンシュユ). Traditional medicine[edit] It occurs in China, Japan and Korea where it is used as a food plant and as a medicinal plant. Chemical constituents[edit] The plant contains oleanolic acid and ursolic acid.[1] Ursolic acid has shown in vitro protective effects on auditory cells.[2] Ethanolic extracts of the fruit of C
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Suckling Pig
A suckling pig or sucking pig is a piglet fed on its mother's milk (i.e., a piglet which is still a "suckling"). In culinary contexts, a suckling pig is slaughtered between the ages of two and six weeks. It is traditionally cooked whole, often roasted, in various cuisines. It is usually prepared for special occasions and gatherings. The meat from suckling pig is pale and tender and the cooked skin is crisp and can be used for pork rinds. The texture of the meat can be somewhat gelatinous due to the amount of collagen in a young pig.Contents1 History 2 Regional dishes2.1 Spanish-speaking countries 2.2 Asia 2.3 European 2.4 United States3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] There are many ancient recipes for suckling pig from Roman and Chinese cuisine. Since the pig is one of the first animals domesticated by human beings for slaughter, many references to pigs are found in human culture
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Chongyang Cake
Chongyang Cake (Chinese: 重阳糕) is a kind of traditional cake eaten on the Chongyang Festival. It is baked and steamed, mainly made up of rice flour and sugar, then decorated with jujube, chestnuts and almonds. As the word for "cake" (糕) sounds like the one for "height" (高) in Chinese, people regard it as a lucky food.[1]Contents1 History 2 Legends of the origin 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Chongyang cake began to be popular in Tang Dynasty. In Song Dynasty, the cakes became popular in Bianjing (now called Kaifeng), in Linan (now Zhejiang), Hangzhou) and other major cities
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Incense Stick
Incense is aromatic biotic material which releases fragrant smoke when burned. The term refers to the material itself, rather than to the aroma that it produces. Incense is used for aesthetic reasons, and in therapy, meditation, and ceremony. It may also be used as a simple deodorant or insectifuge.[1][2][3][4] Incense is composed of aromatic plant materials, often combined with essential oils.[5] The forms taken by incense differ with the underlying culture, and have changed with advances in technology and increasing diversity in the reasons for burning it.[6] Incense can generally be separated into two main types: "indirect-burning" and "direct-burning". Indirect-burning incense (or "non-combustible incense") is not capable of burning on its own, and requires a separate heat source
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Taiwan
Taiwan
Taiwan
(/ˌtaɪˈwɑːn/ ( listen)), officially the Republic of China
China
(ROC), is a state in East Asia.[15][16][17] Its neighbors include the People's Republic of China
China
(PRC) to the west, Japan
Japan
to the northeast, and the Philippines
Philippines
to the south. It is the most populous state and largest economy that is not a member of the United Nations. The island of Taiwan, formerly known as Formosa, was inhabited by aborigines before the 17th century, when Dutch and Spanish colonies opened the island to mass Han immigration. After a brief rule by the Kingdom of Tungning, the island was annexed by the Qing dynasty, the last dynasty of China. The Qing ceded Taiwan
Taiwan
to Japan
Japan
in 1895 after the Sino-Japanese War
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