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Dorothy Height
Dorothy Irene Height (March 24, 1912 – April 20, 2010[1]) was an American administrator and educator who worked as a civil rights and women's rights activist, specifically focused on the issues of African-American women, including unemployment, illiteracy, and voter awareness.[2] She was the president of the National Council of Negro Women for forty years and was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1994 and the Congressional Gold Medal
Congressional Gold Medal
in 2004.[1]Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Later life 4 Personal life and death 5 Awards and honors 6 References 7 Sources 8 External linksEarly life[edit] Dorothy Height
Dorothy Height
was born in Richmond, Virginia. When she was 5 years old, she moved with her family to Rankin, Pennsylvania, a steel town in the suburbs of Pittsburgh, where she graduated from Rankin High School in 1929
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Colmar Manor, Maryland
Colmar Manor is a town located in Prince George's County, Maryland, in the United States.[5] As of the 2010 census, the town had a population of 1,404.[6] As the town developed at the beginning of the 20th century, it assumed a name derived from its proximity to the District of Columbia—the first syllable of Columbia and that of Maryland were combined to form "Colmar".[7] Colmar Manor was incorporated in 1927.[8]Contents1 History1.1 19th Century 1.2 20th Century 1.3 21st Century2 Geography 3 Demographics3.1 2010 census 3.2 2000 census4 Bordering areas 5 Education 6 Notable people 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] 19th Century[edit] The town is home to Dueling Creek, formerly in Bladensburg, Maryland, a small waterway that because of its secluded location was a popular site for dueling. Duels were banned in neighboring Washington, D.C., but legal in Maryland, and Dueling Creek was the site for more than 50 duels between 1808 and 1868
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First Lady
First Lady
First Lady
is an unofficial title used for the wife of a non-monarchical head of state or chief executive.[1][2][3] The term is also used to describe a woman seen to be at the top of her profession or art.[4] The term is often used to a non-monarchical heads of state or chief executives who don't have that kind of style in their own country. Some countries have a title, official or unofficial, that is or can be translated as first lady.[5] The title is not normally used for the wife of a head of government who is not also head of state. First Gentleman is the male equivalent of the title in countries where the head of state's spouse has been a man, such as the Philippines
Philippines
or Malta. While there has never been a male spouse of a U.S
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YWCA
www.worldywca.org www.ywca.org (US)The World Young Women's Christian Association
Young Women's Christian Association
(World YWCA) is a movement working for the empowerment, leadership and rights of women, young women and girls in more than 120 countries. The members and supporters include women from many different faiths, ages, backgrounds, beliefs and cultures
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Washington D.C.
Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia
District of Columbia
and commonly referred to as Washington or D.C., is the capital of the United States of America.[4] Founded after the American Revolution
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Richmond, Virginia
Richmond (/ˈrɪtʃmənd/ RICH-mənd) is the capital of the Commonwealth of Virginia
Virginia
in the United States. It is the center of the Richmond Metropolitan Statistical Area
Metropolitan Statistical Area
(MSA) and the Greater Richmond Region. It was incorporated in 1742, and has been an independent city since 1871. As of the 2010 census, the population was 204,214;[6] in 2016, the population was estimated to be 223,170,[6] the fourth-most populous city in Virginia
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Sierra Leone
Coordinates: 8°30′N 11°30′W / 8.500°N 11.500°W / 8.500; -11.500 Republic
Republic
of Sierra LeoneFlagCoat of armsMotto: "Unity, Freedom, Justice"Anthem: High We Exalt Thee, Realm of the FreeLocation of  Sierra Leone  (dark blue) – in Africa  (light blue & dark grey) – in the African Union  (light blue)  –  [Legend]Capital and largest city Freetown 8°29.067′N 13°14.067′W / 8.484450°N 13.234450°W / 8.484450; -13.234450Official languages EnglishSpoken languagesTemne Mende KrioEthnic groups (2016)35% Temne 34% Mende 10% Fula 4% Limba 5% Kono 2% Krio (Creole) 2% Mandingo 2% Loko 6% othersDemonym Sierra LeoneanGovernment Unitary presidential constitutional republic• President Julius Maada Bio (SLPP)• Vice-PresidentMohamed Juldeh Jalloh (SLPP)• Speaker of ParliamentS.B.B
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Temne People
The Temne people, also called Time, Temen, Timni or Timmanee people, are an African ethnic group.[1][2] They are predominantly found in the northwestern and central parts of Sierra Leone, as well as the national capital Freetown.[2] Some Temne are also found in Guinea.[3] The Temne constitute the largest ethnic group in Sierra Leone, at 35% of the total population, which is slightly more than the Mende people at 31%.[4] They speak Temne, a Mel branch of the Niger–Congo languages.[5] The Temne people
Temne people
likely originated from the Futa Djallon
Futa Djallon
area of Guinea, who left their original settlements to escape Fulani invasions and migrated south before settling between the Kolenté and Rokel River area of Sierra Leone
Sierra Leone
in the 15th century.[1][3] Their traditional religion was Poro
Poro
and Bondo, which incorporate secret initiation ceremonies
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Genealogical Dna Test
A genealogical DNA
DNA
test is a DNA-based test which looks at specific locations of a person's genome in order to determine ancestral ethnicity and genealogical relationships. Results give information about ethnic groups the test subject may be descended from and about other individuals that they may be related to. Three principal types of genealogical DNA
DNA
tests are available, with each looking at a different part of the genome and useful for different types of genealogical research: Autosomal, Mitochondrial, and Y
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National Black Family Reunion
The Black Family Reunion Celebration is a two-day cultural event celebrating the enduring strengths and traditional values of the African-American family. It is sponsored by the National Council of Negro Women. The 24th annual celebration held its first day's activities on the National Mall near the Washington Monument on September 12, 2009, the same day as the Taxpayer March on Washington, fueling controversy over attendance figures.[1] See also[edit]Family reunionReferences[edit]^ Alcindor, Yamiche (September 14, 2009). "Seeking Healing, Seeing Hostility". The Washington Post. Retrieved September 18, 2009. External links[edit] Official siteThis African American–related article is a stub
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Columbia University School Of Social Work
The Columbia University
Columbia University
School of Social Work is affiliated with Columbia University
Columbia University
as one of its graduate schools and began awarding the Master of Science
Master of Science
(MS) degree since 1940. With an enrollment of over 900, it is one of the largest social work programs in the United States.[1] It is also the nation’s oldest, with roots extending back to 1898, when the New York Charity Organization Society’s first summer course was announced in The New York Times
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President Of The United States
House of RepresentativesSpeaker Paul Ryan
Paul Ryan
(R)Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R)Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi
Nancy Pelosi
(D)Co
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Dwight D. Eisenhower
World War II Supreme Allied Commander in EuropeD-Day Operation OverlordSurrender of Germany VE-DayCrusade in EuropePresident of the United StatesPresidencyFirst TermDraft movement1952 CampaignElection1st InaugurationKorean War Atoms for PeaceCold WarNew Look Domino theoryInterstate Highway SystemSecond Term1956 campaignElection2nd InaugurationEisenhower Doctrine Sputnik
Sputnik
crisis Missile gapNDEA NASA DARPACivil Rights Act of 1957 Little Rock NineU-2 incident Farewell AddressPost-PresidencyLegacy Presidential library and museum Tributes and memorialsv t eDwight David "Ike" Eisenhower (/ˈaɪzənhaʊ.ər/ EYE-zən-how-ər; October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969) was an American army general and statesman who served as the 34th President of the United States from 1953 to 1961
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Barack Obama
Pre-presidency Illinois
Illinois
State Senator 2004 DNC keynote address U.S
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New York Amsterdam News
The New York Amsterdam News is an American weekly newspaper geared to the African-American community of New York City, New York. It is one of the oldest African-American newspapers
African-American newspapers
in the United States. It has published columns by notables including W. E. B. Du Bois, Roy Wilkins, Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.
Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.
and was the first to recognize and publish Malcolm X.Contents1 Foundation 2 Circulation 3 Format 4 Operations 5 See also 6 External links 7 ReferencesFoundation[edit] The Amsterdam News was founded on December 4, 1909, and is headquartered in the Harlem
Harlem
neighborhood of Manhattan
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Belmont Report
The Belmont Report is a report created by the National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects of Biomedical and Behavioral Research. Its full title is the Belmont Report: Ethical Principles and Guidelines for the Protection of Human Subjects of Research, Report of the National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects of Biomedical and Behavioral Research. The report was issued on 30 September 1978[1] and published in the Federal Register
Federal Register
on 18 April 1979.[2] The report took its name from the Belmont Conference Center where the document was drafted in part. The Belmont Conference Center, once a part of the Smithsonian Institution, is in Elkridge, Maryland, 10 miles south of Baltimore, and until the end of 2010 was operated by Howard Community College.[3] The Belmont Report[2] summarizes ethical principles and guidelines for research involving human subjects
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