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Donner Party
The Donner Party, or Donner-Reed Party, was a group of American pioneers who set out for California
California
in a wagon train in May 1846. They were delayed by a series of mishaps and mistakes, and spent the winter of 1846–47 snowbound in the Sierra Nevada. Some of the pioneers resorted to cannibalism to survive. The journey west usually took between four and six months, but the Donner Party
Donner Party
was slowed by following a new route called Hastings Cutoff, which crossed Utah's Wasatch Mountains
Wasatch Mountains
and Great Salt Lake Desert
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John C. Frémont
John Charles Frémont or Fremont (January 21, 1813 – July 13, 1890) was an American explorer, politician, and soldier who, in 1856, became the first candidate of the Republican Party for the office of President of the United States. During the 1840s, when he led five expeditions into the American West, that era's penny press and admiring historians accorded Frémont the sobriquet The Pathfinder.[1] During the Mexican–American War, Frémont, a major in the U.S. Army, took control of California
California
from the California
California
Republic in 1846. Frémont was convicted in court martial for mutiny and insubordination over a conflict of who was the military Governor of California. After his sentence was commuted and he was reinstated by President Polk, Frémont resigned from the Army
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Great Salt Lake
The Great Salt
Salt
Lake, located in the northern part of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Utah, is the largest salt water lake in the Western Hemisphere,[1] and the eighth-largest terminal lake in the world.[2] In an average year the lake covers an area of around 1,700 square miles (4,400 km2),[2] but the lake's size fluctuates substantially due to its shallowness. For instance, in 1963 it reached its lowest recorded size at 950 square miles (2,460 km²), but in 1988 the surface area was at the historic high of 3,300 square miles (8,500 km2).[2] In terms of surface area, it is the largest lake in the United States
United States
that is not part of the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
region. The lake is the largest remnant of Lake Bonneville, a prehistoric pluvial lake that once covered much of western Utah
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American Pioneers
American pioneers are any of the people in American history
American history
who migrated west to join in settling and developing new areas. The term especially refers to those who were going to settle any territory which had previously not been settled or developed by European, African or American society, although the territory was inhabited by or utilized by Native Americans. The pioneer concept and ethos greatly predate the migration to parts of the United States
United States
now called Western, as many places now considered as East were also settled by pioneers from the coast
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Teamster
A teamster, in modern American English, is a truck driver, or a member of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, a labor union in the United States
United States
and Canada. Originally, the term "teamster" referred to a person who drove a team of draft animals, usually a wagon drawn by oxen, horses, or mules.[1] This term was common by the time of the Mexican–American War
Mexican–American War
(1848) and the Indian Wars
Indian Wars
throughout the 19th and early 20th centuries on the American frontier. In other places, a teamster was known as a carter, referring to the bullock cart.[2] Another name for the occupation was bullwhacker, related to driving oxen. A teamster might also drive pack animals, such as a muletrain, in which case he was also known as a muleteer or muleskinner
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Tuberculosis
Tuberculosis
Tuberculosis
(TB) is an infectious disease usually caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis
Mycobacterium tuberculosis
(MTB).[1] Tuberculosis
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Fort Laramie, Wyoming
Fort Laramie is a town in Goshen County, Wyoming, United States. The population was 230 at the 2010 census. The town is named after historic Fort Laramie, an important stop on the Oregon, California and Mormon trails, as well as a staging point for various military excursions and treaty signings
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Baron Munchausen
Baron Munchausen
Baron Munchausen
(/ˈmʌntʃaʊzən/[1][a], German pronunciation: [ˈmynçˌhaʊzn][4]) is a fictional German nobleman created by the German writer Rudolf Erich Raspe
Rudolf Erich Raspe
in his 1785 book Baron Munchausen's Narrative of his Marvellous Travels and Campaigns in Russia. The character is loosely based on a real baron, Hieronymus Karl Friedrich, Freiherr
Freiherr
von Münchhausen (German: [ˈmʏnç(h)aʊzn̩]; 1720–1797). Born in Bodenwerder, Electorate of Brunswick-Lüneburg, the real-life Münchhausen fought for the Russian Empire
Russian Empire
in the Russo-Turkish War of 1735–1739. Upon retiring in 1760, he became a minor celebrity within German aristocratic circles for telling outrageous tall tales based on his military career
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Fort Hall
Fort Hall
Fort Hall
was built in 1834 as a fur trading post by Nathaniel Jarvis Wyeth on the Snake River
Snake River
in the eastern Oregon
Oregon
Country, now part of present-day Bannock County in southeastern Idaho, United States. Mr. Wyeth was an inventor and businessman from Boston, Massachusetts, who also founded a post at Fort William, in present-day Portland, Oregon, as part of a plan for a new trading and fisheries company. Unable to compete with the powerful British Hudson's Bay Company, based at Fort Vancouver, in 1837 Wyeth sold both posts to it
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Weber Canyon
I-84 Overland RouteWeber Canyon
Canyon
is a canyon in the Wasatch Range
Wasatch Range
near Ogden, Utah, through which the Weber River
Weber River
flows west toward the Great Salt Lake. It is fed by 13 tributary creeks and is 40 miles (64 km) long.Contents1 History 2 Attractions 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] Weber Canyon
Canyon
is, historically, one of the more important canyons in Utah. The many streams that feed into the Weber River
Weber River
made the area attractive to prehistoric nomadic Native Americans, including the Shoshone
Shoshone
and Ute tribes. The river and canyon were named for fur trapper John Henry Weber. Early explorers also included Étienne Provost
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Lahontan Valley
The Lahontan Valley
Lahontan Valley
is in Churchill County in the U.S. state of Nevada. The valley is a landform of the central portion of the prehistoric Lake Lahontan's lakebed of 20,000-9,000 years ago. The valley and the adjacent Carson Sink
Carson Sink
represent a small portion of the lake bed, and Humboldt Lake
Humboldt Lake
is to the valley's northeast (Pyramid Lake is west and Walker Lake is south). Aside from the city of Fallon, the railroad junction at Hazen, and the ghost town of Stillwater, the Lahontan Valley
Lahontan Valley
is mostly uninhabited desert
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Pierre Louis Vasquez
Pierre Louis Vasquez also known as Luis Vázquez (October 3, 1798 – September 5, 1868) was a mountain man and trader. He was a contemporary of many famous European-American explorers of the early west and would come to know many of them, including Jim Bridger, Manuel Lisa, Kit Carson and Andrew Sublette, besides his own father Benito Vázquez. Family and early life[edit] Louis was born and raised at St. Louis, Missouri. He was the son of the Spanish fur trader Benito Vázquez and Marie-Julie Papin (daughter of Pierre Papin & Catherine Guichard), so was of Spanish and French Canadian (European) descent. In 1823, he became a fur trader, receiving his first license to trade with the Pawnee. By the early 1830s he had shifted his operations to the mountains, becoming a popular and active mountain man and trader. Having been educated by the Priests at the St. Louis Cathedral, he was one of the few mountain men that was literate
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Ruby Mountains
The Ruby Mountains are a mountain range, primarily located within Elko County with a small extension into White Pine County, in Nevada, United States. Most of the range is included within the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest.[2] The range reaches a maximum elevation of 11,387 feet (3,471 m) on the summit of Ruby Dome.[3] To the north is Secret Pass and the East Humboldt Range, and from there the Rubies run south-southwest for about 80 miles (130 km). To the east lies Ruby Valley, and to the west lie Huntington and Lamoille Valleys
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Paiute
Paiute (/ˈpaɪjuːt/; also Piute) refers to three non-continguous groups of indigenous peoples of the Great Basin. These three groups, although related within the Numic group of Uto-Aztecan
Uto-Aztecan
languages, do not form a single node within that group.[1] The term "Paiute" does not refer to a single, unique, unified group of Great Basin tribes, but is a historical label.[2] Northern Paiute
Northern Paiute
of California, Idaho, Nevada and Oregon. Southern Paiute of Arizona, Nevada and Utah. Mono of California, divided into Owens Valley Paiute (Eastern Mono) and Western Mono (Monache).References[edit]^ Glottolog ^ d'Azevedo, Warren L
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Truckee River
The Truckee River
River
is a river in the U.S. states of California
California
and Nevada. The river flows northeasterly and is 121 miles (195 km) long.[2][6] The Truckee is the sole outlet of Lake Tahoe
Lake Tahoe
and drains part of the high Sierra Nevada, emptying into Pyramid Lake in the Great Basin. Its waters are an important source of irrigation along its valley and adjacent valleys.Contents1 Naming of the river 2 Course and watershed 3 River
River
modifications 4 Ecology 5 Recreation 6 Hydrology and water quality 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksNaming of the river[edit] When John C. Frémont
John C

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Miwok
Subgroups:Plains & Sierra Miwok Coast Miwok Lake Miwok Bay MiwokThe Miwok
Miwok
(also spelled Miwuk, Mi-Wuk, or Me-Wuk) are members of four linguistically related Native American groups indigenous to what is now Northern California, who traditionally spoke one of the Miwok languages in the Utian family. The word Miwok
Miwok
means people in their native language.Contents1 Subgroups 2 Federally recognized tribes2.1 Non-federally recognized tribes3 History 4 Culture4.1 Cuisine 4.2 Religion 4.3 Languages 4.4 Sports5 Population 6 Influences on popular culture 7 See also 8 Notes 9 References 10 External linksSubgroups[edit] Anthropologists commonly divide the Miwok
Miwok
into four geographically and culturally diverse ethnic subgroups
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