HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Donald Davies
Donald
Donald
Watts Davies, CBE, FRS[1] (7 June 1924 – 28 May 2000) was a Welsh computer scientist who was employed at the UK National Physical Laboratory (NPL). In 1965 he developed the concept of packet switching,[2][3] which is today the dominant basis for data communications in computer networks worldwide, and implemented it in the NPL network.[4][5] This was independent of the work of Paul Baran in the United States who had a similar idea in the early 1960s.[6] The ARPANET
ARPANET
project, a precursor to the Internet, credited Davies for his influence.[7][8]Contents1 Early life 2 Career history2.1 National Physical Laboratory 2.2 Packet switched network design 2.3 Later work3 Awards and honours 4 Family 5 See also 6 Books 7 References 8 External linksEarly life[edit] Davies was born in Treorchy
Treorchy
in the Rhondda
Rhondda
Valley, Wales
[...More...]

"Donald Davies" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Biographical Memoirs Of Fellows Of The Royal Society
The Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society
Royal Society
is an academic journal on the history of science published annually by the Royal Society. It publishes obituaries of Fellows of the Royal Society. It was established in 1932 as Obituary Notices of Fellows of the Royal Society
Royal Society
and obtained its current title in 1955, with volume numbering restarting at 1. Prior to 1932, obituaries were published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society. The memoirs are a significant historical record and most include a full bibliography of works by the subjects. The memoirs are often written by a scientist of the next generation, often one of the subject's own former students, or a close colleague. In many cases the author is also a Fellow
[...More...]

"Biographical Memoirs Of Fellows Of The Royal Society" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Advanced Research Projects Agency
The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is an agency of the United States Department of Defense
United States Department of Defense
responsible for the development of emerging technologies for use by the military. Originally known as the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA), the agency was created in February 1958 by President Dwight D. Eisenhower in response to the Soviet launching of Sputnik 1
Sputnik 1
in 1957. Since its inception, the agency's mission is ensuring that the United States avoids further technological surprise.[3] By collaborating with academic, industry, and government partners, DARPA
DARPA
formulates and executes research and development projects to expand the frontiers of technology and science, often beyond immediate U.S
[...More...]

"Advanced Research Projects Agency" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Automatic Computing Engine
The Automatic Computing Engine
Automatic Computing Engine
(ACE) was an early electronic stored-program computer designed by Alan Turing. The project was managed by John R. Womersley,[1] superintendent of the Mathematics Division of the National Physical Laboratory (NPL). The use of the word Engine was in homage to Charles Babbage
Charles Babbage
and his Difference Engine and Analytical Engine. Turing's technical design Proposed Electronic Calculator was the product of his theoretical work in 1936 "On Computable Numbers"[2] and his wartime experience at Bletchley Park where the Colossus computers
Colossus computers
had been successful in breaking German military codes
[...More...]

"Automatic Computing Engine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Universal Turing Machine
In computer science, a universal Turing machine
Turing machine
(UTM) is a Turing machine that can simulate an arbitrary Turing machine
Turing machine
on arbitrary input. The universal machine essentially achieves this by reading both the description of the machine to be simulated as well as the input thereof from its own tape. Alan Turing
Alan Turing
introduced the idea of such a machine in 1936–1937
[...More...]

"Universal Turing Machine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

English Electric DEUCE
Electricity
Electricity
is the set of physical phenomena associated with the presence and motion of electric charge. Although initially considered a phenomenon separate from magnetism, since the development of Maxwell's equations, both are recognized as part of a single phenomenon: electromagnetism. Various common phenomena are related to electricity, including lightning, static electricity, electric heating, electric discharges and many others. The presence of an electric charge, which can be either positive or negative, produces an electric field. The movement of electric charges is an electric current and produces a magnetic field. When a charge is placed in a location with a non-zero electric field, a force will act on it. The magnitude of this force is given by Coulomb's law. Thus, if that charge were to move, the electric field would be doing work on the electric charge
[...More...]

"English Electric DEUCE" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

English Electric Computers
The LEO I (Lyons Electronic Office I) was the first computer used for commercial business applications. The prototype LEO I was modelled closely on the Cambridge EDSAC. Its construction was overseen by Oliver Standingford, Raymond Thompson and David Caminer of J. Lyons and Co.. LEO I ran its first business application in 1951. In 1954 Lyons formed LEO Computers Ltd to market LEO I and its successors LEO II and LEO III to other companies. LEO Computers eventually became part of English Electric Company (EELM) and then International Computers Limited (ICL) and ultimately Fujitsu. LEO series computers were still in use until 1981.[1]Contents1 Origins and initial design 2 Technical description 3 Applications and successors3.1 Leo III4 Legacy 5 See also 6 References 7 Bibliography7.1 Books 7.2 Articles8 External linksOrigins and initial design[edit] J
[...More...]

"English Electric Computers" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rand Corporation
RAND Corporation
RAND Corporation
("Research ANd Development")[8] is an American nonprofit global policy think tank[1] created in 1948 by Douglas Aircraft Company to offer research and analysis to the United States Armed Forces. It is financed by the U.S. government and private endowment,[6] corporations,[9] universities[9] and private individuals.[9] The company has grown to assist other governments, international organizations, private companies and foundations, with a host of defense and non-defense issues, including healthcare. RAND aims for interdisciplinary and quantitative problem solving by translating theoretical concepts from formal economics and the physical sciences into novel applications in other areas, using applied science and operations research. RAND has approximately 1,700 employees
[...More...]

"Rand Corporation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Teddington
Teddington
Teddington
is a suburban area lying west south-west of London, England. Historically in Middlesex, it has been part of the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames since 1965. Teddington
Teddington
is on the north bank of the Thames, just after the start of a long meander, between Hampton Wick
Hampton Wick
and Strawberry Hill, Twickenham
[...More...]

"Teddington" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Massachusetts Institute Of Technology
The Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
(MIT) is a private research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States. Founded in 1861 in response to the increasing industrialization of the United States, MIT adopted a European polytechnic university model and stressed laboratory instruction in applied science and engineering. The Institute is traditionally known for its research and education in the physical sciences and engineering, but more recently in biology, economics, linguistics and management as well
[...More...]

"Massachusetts Institute Of Technology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

National Inventors Hall Of Fame
The National Inventors
Inventors
Hall of Fame
Hall of Fame
(NIHF) is an American not-for-profit organization which recognizes individual engineers and inventors who hold a U.S
[...More...]

"National Inventors Hall Of Fame" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tube Alloys
Tube Alloys
Tube Alloys
was a codename of the clandestine research and development programme, authorised by the United Kingdom, with participation from Canada, to develop nuclear weapons during the Second World War. Starting before the Manhattan Project
Manhattan Project
in the United States, the British efforts were kept classified and as such had to be referred to by code even within the highest circles of government. The possibility of nuclear weapons was acknowledged early in the war. At the University of Birmingham, Rudolf Peierls
Rudolf Peierls
and Otto Frisch co-wrote a memorandum explaining that a small mass of pure uranium-235 could be used to produce a chain reaction in a bomb with the power of thousands of tons of TNT. This led to the formation of the MAUD Committee, which called for an all-out effort to develop nuclear weapons
[...More...]

"Tube Alloys" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Computer Security
Cybersecurity, computer security or IT security is the protection of computer systems from the theft and damage to their hardware, software or information, as well as from disruption or misdirection of the services they provide. Cybersecurity includes controlling physical access to the hardware, as well as protecting against harm that may come via network access, data and code injection.[1] Also, due to malpractice by operators, whether intentional or accidental, IT security is susceptible to being tricked into deviating from secure procedures through various methods.[2] The field is of growing importance due to the increasing reliance on computer systems and the Internet,[3] wireless networks such as Bluetooth
[...More...]

"Computer Security" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Message Authentication Code
In cryptography, a message authentication code (MAC), sometimes known as a tag, is a short piece of information used to authenticate a message—in other words, to confirm that the message came from the stated sender (its authenticity) and has not been changed. The MAC value protects both a message's data integrity as well as its authenticity, by allowing verifiers (who also possess the secret key) to detect any changes to the message content.Contents1 Definitions 2 Security 3 Message integrity codes 4 Implementation 5 Standards 6 An example of MAC use6.1 One-time MAC7 See also 8 Notes 9 References 10 External linksDefinitions[edit] Informally, a message authentication code consists of three algorithms:A key generation algorithm selects a key from the key space uniformly at random. A signing algorithm efficiently returns a tag given the key and the message. A verifying algorithm efficiently verifies the authenticity of the message given the key and the tag
[...More...]

"Message Authentication Code" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

British Computer Society
The British Computer Society
British Computer Society
(BCS) is a professional body and a learned society that represents those working in Information Technology, both in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and internationally
[...More...]

"British Computer Society" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Internet Society
The Internet
Internet
Society (ISOC) is an American non-profit organization founded in 1992 to provide leadership in Internet-related standards, education, access, and policy. Its mission is "to promote the open development, evolution and use of the Internet
Internet
for the benefit of all people throughout the world".[1] The Internet
Internet
Society has its global headquarters in Reston, Virginia, United States
United States
(near Washington, D.C.), a major office in Geneva, Switzerland, and regional bureaus in Brussels, Singapore, and Montevideo
[...More...]

"Internet Society" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.