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Don't Turn 'Em Loose
Don't Turn 'Em Loose
Don't Turn 'Em Loose
is a 1936 American crime drama film directed by Ben Stoloff and produced by RKO Radio Pictures, who released the film on September 18, 1936. The screenplay was written by Harry Segall and Ferdinand Reyher; according to the American Film Institute, the story was suggested by Thomas Walsh's short story "Homecoming". The film stars Lewis Stone, James Gleason, Bruce Cabot, Louise Latimer and Betty Grable.Contents1 Plot 2 Cast list 3 Production 4 Reception 5 ReferencesPlot[edit] Bob Webster, aka Bat Williams, is a career criminal who keeps his parents and siblings in the dark about his chosen career by pretending to be an engineer who is often away in different parts of the world on assignments. He uses this ploy not only to disguise when he is out of town engaged in criminal activities, but also to cover the times he has been sentenced to prison
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Variety (magazine)
Variety is a weekly American entertainment trade magazine and website owned by Penske Media Corporation. It was founded by Sime Silverman in New York in 1905 as a weekly newspaper reporting on theater and vaudeville. In 1933 it added Daily Variety, based in Los Angeles, to cover the motion-picture industry
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William Morgan (director)
William Morgan (1899–1964) was a London-born film editor and director.[1]Selected filmography[edit] Storm Over Bengal
Storm Over Bengal
(1938) (editor) Bowery Boy (1940) Secrets of the Underground
Secrets of the Underground
(1942)References[edit]^ "William Morgan". IMDB. Retrieved 21 October 2012. This article about a British film director is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eThis article about a film editor is a stub
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The Film Daily
The Film
Film
Daily was a daily publication that existed from 1915 to 1970 in the United States. For 55 years, Film
Film
Daily was the main source of news on the film and television industries
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Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Times is a daily newspaper which has been published in Los Angeles, California
Los Angeles, California
since 1881
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Samuel J. Briskin
Samuel J. Briskin
Samuel J. Briskin
(February 8, 1896 – November 14, 1968) was one of the foremost producers of Hollywood's Golden Age, who was the head of production during his career of 3 of the "Big 8" major film studios of its Golden Age: Columbia (twice), Paramount, and RKO. In the late 1950s he would also serve briefly on the board of directors of another major, MGM. During World War II Briskin served in the army's Signal Corps as a film producer, attaining the rank of lieutenant colonel. After the war he co-founded Liberty Films
Liberty Films
with Frank Capra, who were later joined by William Wyler
William Wyler
and George Stevens. The studio only produced two films, but both are now considered classics: It's a Wonderful Life and State of the Union
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National Legion Of Decency
The National Legion of Decency, also known as the Catholic Legion of Decency,[1] was founded in 1933 as an organization dedicated to identifying and combating objectionable content in motion pictures from the point of view of the American Catholic Church.[2]:4 After receiving a stamp of approval from the secular offices behind Hollywood's Production Code, films during this time period were then submitted to the National Legion of Decency to be reviewed prior to their official duplication and distribution to the general public.[2]:5 Condemnation by the Legion would shake a film's core for success because it meant the population of Catholics, some twenty million strong at the time, were theoretically forbidden from attending any screening of the film under pain of mortal sin.[2] The ef
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American Film Institute
The American Film Institute
American Film Institute
(AFI) is an American film
American film
organization that educates filmmakers and honors the heritage of the motion picture arts in the United States. AFI is supported by private funding and public membership.Contents1 Leadership 2 History 3 List of programs in brief 4 AFI Conservatory4.1 Notable alumni5 AFI programs5.1 AFI Catalog of Feature Films 5.2 AFI Life Achievement Award 5.3 AFI Awards 5.4 AFI Maya Deren Award 5.5 AFI 100 Years... series 5.6 AFI film festivals5.6.1 AFI Fest 5.6.2 AFI Docs5.7 AFI Silver
AFI Silver
Theatre and Cultural Center 5.8 The AFI Directing Workshop for Women6 AFI Directors Series 7 In popular culture 8 2017 Sexual harassment allegations 9 See also 10 References 11 External linksLeadership[edit] The institute is composed of leaders from the film, entertainment, business and academic communities
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Drama Film
In reference to film and television, drama is a genre of narrative fiction (or semi-fiction) intended to be more serious than humourous in tone.[1] Drama
Drama
of this kind is usually qualified with additional terms that specify its particular subgenre, such as "political drama", "legal drama", "historical period drama", "domestic drama", or "comedy-drama". These terms tend to indicate a particular setting or subject-matter, or else they qualify the otherwise serious tone of a drama with elements that encourage a broader range of moods. All forms of cinema or television that involve fictional stories are forms of drama in the broader sense if their storytelling is achieved by means of actors who represent (mimesis) characters
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RKO Pictures
RKO Pictures
RKO Pictures
is an American film production and distribution company. In its original incarnation, as RKO Radio Pictures Inc., it was one of the Big Five studios of Hollywood's Golden Age. The business was formed after the Keith-Albee-Orpheum (KAO) theater chain and Joseph P. Kennedy's Film Booking Offices of America
Film Booking Offices of America
(FBO) studio were brought together under the control of the Radio Corporation of America
Radio Corporation of America
(RCA) in October 1928.[a] RCA chief David Sarnoff
David Sarnoff
engineered the merger to create a market for the company's sound-on-film technology, RCA Photophone. By the mid-1940s, the studio was under the control of investor Floyd Odlum. RKO has long been renowned for its cycle of musicals starring Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers
Ginger Rogers
in the mid- to late 1930s
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Jack MacKenzie
Jack MacKenzie (13 September 1892 – 19 December 1979) was a British-born cinematographer who worked for most of his career in the United States. During the silent era Jack MacKenzie was employed in Hollywood. In 1930 MacKenzie was sent to London by RKO
RKO
to work on two films for the company's British partner Associated Talking Pictures. MacKenzie then returned to America
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Photoplay
Photoplay
Photoplay
was one of the first American film fan magazines. It was founded in 1911 in Chicago, the same year that J. Stuart Blackton founded Motion Picture Story, a magazine also directed at fans. For most of its run, Photoplay
Photoplay
was published by Macfadden Publications.Contents1 History 2 Popularity 3 The Photoplay
Photoplay
Magazine Medal3.1 Medal of Honor Winners: 1920–1939 3.2 Gold Medal Winners for film of the year: 1944–19684 Merger 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Photoplay
Photoplay
began as a short-fiction magazine concerned mostly with the plots and characters of films at the time and was used as a promotional tool for those films
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Betty Grable
Elizabeth Ruth Grable (December 18, 1916 – July 2, 1973) was an American actress, pin-up girl, dancer, and singer. Her 42 movies during the 1930s and 1940s grossed more than $100 million and she set a record of 12 consecutive years in the top 10 of box office stars. The U.S. Treasury Department in 1946 and 1947 listed her as the highest-salaried American woman; she earned more than $3 million during her career.[1]Contents1 Career 2 Early life 3 Career3.1 Early career: 1929–1939 3.2 Stardom at Fox: 1940–1949 3.3 Decline and last films: 1950–19554 Personal life 5 Death 6 Legacy 7 Filmography 8 Stage work 9 Radio appearances 10 References 11 External linksCareer[edit] Grable began her film career in 1929 at age 12, after which she was fired from a contract when it was learned she signed up under false identification. She had contracts with RKO and Paramount Pictures during the 1930s, and appeared in a string of B movies, mostly portraying college students
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Harrison's Reports
Harrison’s Reports was a New York City-based motion picture trade journal published weekly from 1919 to 1962. The typical issue was four letter-size pages sent to subscribers under a second-class mail permit. Its founder, editor and publisher was P. S. Harrison (1880–1966), who previously had been a reviewer for Motion Picture News, in which his column was titled "Harrison’s Exhibitor Reviews". The first issue, dated 5 July 1919, stated that film advertising would not be accepted. A year’s subscription cost $10. For more than a year, the type was set by a typewriter. The issue of 4 December 1920 and all subsequent issues were professionally typeset
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Motion Picture Herald
The Motion Picture Herald was an American film industry trade paper published from 1931 to December 1972.[1][2][3] It was replaced by the QP Herald, which only lasted until May 1973.[4] The paper's origins go further back two decades. In 1915, a Chicago printing company launched a film publication as a regional trade paper for exhibitors in the Midwest and known as Exhibitors Herald. Publisher Martin Quigley bought the paper and over the following two decades developed the Exhibitors Herald into an important American national trade paper for the US film industry.[5] In 1917, Quigley acquired and merged another publication Motography.[5] into his magazine
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Open Access
Open access
Open access
(OA) refers to online research outputs that are free of all restrictions on access (e.g. access tolls) and free of many restrictions on use (e.g
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