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Domitian
14 September 81 – 18 September 96 (15 years)Predecessor TitusSuccessor NervaBorn (51-10-24)24 October 51 RomeDied 18 September 96(96-09-18) (aged 44) RomeBurial RomeWife Domitia Longina
Domitia Longina
(70–96)Issue son (80–83)Full name Titus
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Praetor
Praetor
Praetor
(Classical Latin: [ˈprajtoːr], also spelled prætor) was a title granted by the government of Ancient Rome
Ancient Rome
to men acting in one of two official capacities: the commander of an army (in the field or, less often, before the army had been mustered); or, an elected magistratus (magistrate), assigned various duties (which varied at different periods in Rome's history). The functions of the magistracy, the praetura (praetorship), are described by the adjective:[1] the praetoria potestas (praetorian power), the praetorium imperium (praetorian authority), and the praetorium ius (praetorian law), the legal precedents established by the praetores (praetors)
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Battle Of Pharsalus
The Battle of Pharsalus
Pharsalus
was a decisive battle of Caesar's Civil War. On 9 August 48 BC at Pharsalus
Pharsalus
in central Greece, Gaius Julius Caesar and his allies formed up opposite the army of the republic under the command of Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus (" Pompey
Pompey
the Great"). Pompey
Pompey
had the backing of a majority of the senators, of whom many were optimates, and his army significantly outnumbered the veteran Caesarian legions. The two armies confronted each other over several months of uncertainty, Caesar being in a much weaker position than Pompey
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Propaganda
Propaganda
Propaganda
is information that is not objective and is used primarily to influence an audience and further an agenda, often by presenting facts selectively to encourage a particular synthesis or perception, or using loaded language to produce an emotional rather than a rational response to the information that is presented.[1] Propaganda is often associated with material prepared by governments, but activist groups, companies and the media can also produce propaganda. In the twentieth century, the term propaganda has been associated with a manipulative approach, but propaganda historically was a neutral descriptive term.[1][2] A wide ra
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Musée Du Louvre
8.1 million (2017)Ranked 1st nationally Ranked 1st globallyDirector Jean-Luc MartinezCurator Marie-Laure de RochebrunePublic transit accessPalais Royal – Musée du Louvre
Musée du Louvre
Louvre-Rivoli Website www.louvre.frThe Louvre
Louvre
(US: /ˈluːv(rə)/),[1] or the Louvre
Louvre
Museum (French: Musée du Louvre
Musée du Louvre
[myze dy luvʁ] ( listen)), is the world's largest art museum and a historic monument in Paris, France. A central landmark of the city, it is located on the Right Bank of the Seine
Seine
in the city's 1st arrondissement (district or ward)
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Roman Senate
The Roman Senate
Senate
(Latin: Senatus Romanus; Italian: Senato Romano) was a political institution in ancient Rome. It was one of the most enduring institutions in Roman history, being established in the first days of the city (traditionally founded in 753 BC). It survived the overthrow of the kings in 509 BC, the fall of the Roman Republic
Roman Republic
in the 1st century BC, the division of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in 395 AD, the fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in 476 AD, and the barbarian rule of Rome
Rome
in the 5th, 6th, and 7th centuries. During the days of the kingdom, it was little more than an advisory council to the king
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Damnatio Memoriae
Damnatio memoriae
Damnatio memoriae
is a modern Latin phrase literally meaning "condemnation of memory", meaning that a person must not be remembered. It was a form of dishonor that could be passed by the Roman Senate
Roman Senate
on traitors or others who brought discredit to the Roman State. The intent was to erase the malefactor from history.Contents1 Overview1.1 Etymology 1.2 Practice2 See also 3 References 4 External linksOverview[edit] Damnatio memoriae, or oblivion, as a punishment was originally created by the peoples of Ephesus
Ephesus
after Herostratus
Herostratus
set fire to the Temple of Artemis, one of the Seven Wonders of antiquity. The Romans, who viewed it as a punishment worse than death, adopted this practice
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Titus Flavius Petro
Titus Flavius Petro (fl 1st century BC) was the paternal grandfather of the Roman Emperor
Roman Emperor
Vespasian. He was allegedly the son of a contracted laborer, who each summer crossed the Po to assist the Sabines with their harvests. However, Suetonius
Suetonius
wrote that his careful research failed to support this story. Petro was born and raised in Reate, in Sabinia, Italy. He fought for Pompey
Pompey
in Caesar's Civil War
Caesar's Civil War
as a centurion or a volunteer reservist. Leaving the battlefield of Pharsalus in Greece, he secured a discharge with a full pardon and became a tax collector. He married a woman called Tertulla (c. 40 BC - aft
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Centurion
A centurion (Latin: centurio; Greek: κεντυρίων, kentyríōn, or ἑκατόνταρχος, hekatóntarkhos) was a professional officer of the Roman army
Roman army
after the Marian reforms
Marian reforms
of 107 BC. Most centurions commanded groups of centuries of around 80 legionaries [5] but senior centurions commanded cohorts or took senior staff roles in their legion. Centurions were also found in the Roman navy
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Titus Flavius Sabinus (father Of Vespasian)
See also Titus Flavius Sabinus (other) for other men of this name. Titus Flavius T. f. Sabinus was the father of the emperor Vespasian. Sabinus was the son of Titus Flavius Petro and his wife, Tertulla, and was an eques from Reate in the Sabine region of Italy
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Scotland
Scotland
Scotland
(/ˈskɒtlənd/; Scots: [ˈskɔtlənd]; Scottish Gaelic: Alba
Alba
[ˈal̪ˠapə] ( listen)) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and covers the northern third of the island of Great Britain.[16][17][18] It shares a border with England
England
to the south, and is otherwise surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, with the North Sea
North Sea
to the east and the North Channel and Irish Sea
Irish Sea
to the south-west. In addition to the mainland, the country is made up of more than 790 islands,[19] including the Northern Isles
Northern Isles
and the Hebrides. The Kingdom of Scotland
Kingdom of Scotland
emerged as an independent sovereign state in the Early Middle Ages
Early Middle Ages
and continued to exist until 1707
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Equestrian (Roman)
The equites (Latin: eques nom. singular; sometimes called "knights" in modern times because of the involvement of horses) constituted the second of the property based classes of ancient Rome, ranking below the senatorial class
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Tax Collector
A tax collector or a taxman is a person who collects unpaid taxes from other people or corporations. Tax
Tax
collectors are often portrayed in fiction as being evil, and in the modern world share a similar stereotype to that of lawyers.[citation needed]Contents1 Historical tax collectors1.1 Tax
Tax
collectors in the Bible 1.2 Other historical tax collectors2 Modern tax collection agencies 3 See also 4 ReferencesHistorical tax collectors[edit] Tax
Tax
collectors in the Bible[edit] Tax
Tax
collectors, also known as publicans, are mentioned many times in the Bible (mainly in the New Testament). They were reviled by the Jews of Jesus' day because of their perceived greed and collaboration with the Roman occupiers. Tax
Tax
collectors amassed personal wealth by demanding tax payments in excess of what Rome levied and keeping the difference.[1] They worked for tax farmers
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Helvetia
Helvetia
Helvetia
is the female national personification of Switzerland, officially Confœderatio Helvetica, the Swiss Confederation. The allegory is typically pictured in a flowing gown, with a spear and a shield emblazoned with the Swiss flag, and commonly with braided hair, commonly with a wreath as a symbol of confederation. The name is a derivation of the ethnonym Helvetii, the name of the Gaulish tribe inhabiting the Swiss Plateau
Swiss Plateau
prior to the Roman conquest.Contents1 History 2 Name of Switzerland 3 Gallery 4 See also 5 BibliographyHistory[edit] Matthäus Merian
Matthäus Merian
(1642).The fashion of depicting the Swiss Confederacy in terms of female allegories arises in the 17th century
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Cursus Honorum
The cursus honorum (Latin: "course of offices") was the sequential order of public offices held by aspiring politicians in both the Roman Republic
Republic
and the early Roman Empire. It was designed for men of senatorial rank. The cursus honorum comprised a mixture of military and political administration posts. Each office had a minimum age for election. There were minimum intervals between holding successive offices and laws forbade repeating an office.[citation needed] These rules were altered and flagrantly ignored in the course of the last century of the Republic. For example, Gaius Marius
Gaius Marius
held consulships for five years in a row between 104 BC and 100 BC. He held consulship a total of seven times, also serving 86, and 107 BC. Officially presented as opportunities for public service, the offices often became mere opportunities for self-aggrandizement
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