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Dominique Sigaud
Dominique Sigaud (born 28 January 1959 in Paris) is a French journalist, essayist and novelist.Contents1 Biography 2 Works 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] From 1984 to 1996, as an independent journalist, she traveled the Arab world and Africa. In 1996, she was awarded the Association des femmes journalistes (fr) prize for her article "Tutsis and Hutus: they are rebuilding together Rwanda in ruins", published in the magazine Cosmopolitan in November 1995.[1] Since then she has devoted herself to writing. Works[edit]1991: La Fracture algérienne. Calmann-Levy. p. 264. ISBN 978-2-7021-1950-1.  1996: L'Hypothèse du désert. Gallimard. p. 166. ISBN 978-2-07-074561-6.  (Prix Gironde du premier roman 2007)[2] prix Alain Fournier 1997, prix Emmanuel Roblès 1997, prix Marguerite Yourcenar 1997 1997: La Vie, là-bas, comme le cours de l'oued. Gallimard. p. 136. ISBN 978-2-07-074942-3. [3] 1998: Blue Moon
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Cosmopolitan (magazine)
Cosmopolitan is an international fashion magazine for women, which was formerly titled The Cosmopolitan. The magazine was first published and distributed in 1886 in the United States
United States
as a family magazine; it was later transformed into a literary magazine and eventually became a women's magazine (since 1965). Often referred to as Cosmo, its content as of 2011 includes articles discussing: relationships, sex, health, careers, self-improvement, celebrities, fashion, and beauty
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International Standard Name Identifier
The International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI) is an identifier for uniquely identifying the public identities of contributors to media content such as books, television programmes, and newspaper articles. Such an identifier consists of 16 digits. It can optionally be displayed as divided into four blocks. It was developed under the auspices of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as Draft International Standard 27729; the valid standard was published on 15 March 2012
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Éditions Gallimard
Éditions Gallimard
Éditions Gallimard
(French: [edisjɔ̃ ɡalimaːʁ]) is one of the leading French publishers of books. The Guardian
The Guardian
has described it as having "the best backlist in the world".[1] In 2003 it and its subsidiaries published 1,418 titles. It was founded on 31 May 1911 in Paris
Paris
by Gaston Gallimard (1881–1975) as Les Éditions de la Nouvelle Revue Française. It is currently led by Antoine Gallimard.[2] From its 31 May 1911 founding until June 1919, published one hundred titles including La Jeune Parque by Paul Valéry.[3][4] The publisher published the second volume of In Search of Lost Time, In the Shadow of Young Girls in Flower, which became the first Prix Goncourt-awarded book published by the company.[5] During the occupation of France in World War II, Gaston Gallimard was hosted in Carcassonne
Carcassonne
by poet Joë Bousquet
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Bibliothèque Nationale De France
The Bibliothèque nationale de France
France
(BnF, English: National Library of France"; French: [bi.bli.jɔ.tɛk na.sjɔ.nal də fʁɑ̃s]) is the national library of France, located in Paris. It is the national repository of all that is published in France
France
and also holds extensive historical collections.Contents1 History 2 New buildings 3 Mission 4 Manuscript
Manuscript
collection 5 Digital library 6 List of directors6.1 1369–1792 6.2 1792–present7 In popular culture 8 See also 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksHistory[edit]See also: History of the Bibliothèque nationale de France (fr)The National Library of France
France
traces its origin to the royal library founded at the Louvre Palace
Louvre Palace
by Charles V in 1368
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Système Universitaire De Documentation
The système universitaire de documentation or SUDOC is a system used by the libraries of French universities and higher education establishments to identify, track and manage the documents in their possession. The catalog, which contains more than 10 million references, allows students and researcher to search for bibliographical and location information in over 3,400 documentation centers. It is maintained by the Bibliographic Agency for Higher Education (fr) (ABES). External links[edit]Official websiteThis article relating to library science or information science is a stub
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Collection Blanche
The Collection Blanche is the great series of French literature
French literature
of the éditions Gallimard. It appeared in 1911, and at the beginning was nourished by the publications of La Nouvelle Revue française, the brand "Librairie Gallimard" appeared only after July 1919.[1] Since its creation, "La Blanche", which takes its name from the cream color of its cover, has published 6500 titles, of which 3800 are still available today. In addition to the "NRF" logo originally designed by Jean Schlumberger, the graphic charter of this collection - a black border surrounding two red edges - is inspired by the éditions de La Phalange (fr), with its first title, L'Otage by Paul Claudel, published 26 May 1911.[1] For a time, the first printer of this collection was Verbeke, director of "The St
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Gallimard Jeunesse
Gallimard Jeunesse is a French publisher of children's books. It is a subsidiary of Éditions Gallimard. It is the publisher of the French version of Animorphs, The English Roses by Madonna, Pokémon
Pokémon
chapter books and Harry Potter
Harry Potter
books
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Calmann-Levy
Calmann-Lévy is a French publishing house founded in 1836 by Michel Lévy (1821–1875) and his brother Kalmus "Calmann" Lévy (1819–1891), as Michel Lévy frères. It was renamed Calmann Lévy after the death of Michel in 1875.[1] By 1875, the company was among the foremost publishing houses of Europe. It was the publisher of most of the important French authors of the second half of the 19th century, including Balzac, Baudelaire, René Bazin, Gabriele D'Annunzio, Dumas, Flaubert, Victor Hugo,[2] Lamartine, Ernest Renan, George Sand, Stendhal. In 1893, Calmann was succeeded by his sons Georges, Paul and Gaston, who went on to publish authors including Anatole France, Pierre Loti and Proust. During Nazi occupation, Gaston Lévy was interned, and the publishing company, run by the Germans, was renamed Éditions Balzac in 1943. After the liberation, the company was headed by Léon Pioton
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Actes Sud
Actes Sud is a French publishing house based in Arles. It was founded in 1978 by author Hubert Nyssen.[1][2][3] By 2013, the company, now headed by Nyssen's daughter, Françoise Nyssen,[1] had an annual turnover of 60 million euros and 60 staff members.[2] In 2015, two of its authors won literary prizes: Mathias Énard
Mathias Énard
won the Prix Goncourt
Prix Goncourt
and Svetlana Alexievich
Svetlana Alexievich
won the Nobel Prize in Literature.[4] References[edit]^ a b Leménager, Grégoire (November 15, 2011). "La mort d'Hubert Nyssen, fondateur d'Actes Sud". Le Nouvel Observateur. Retrieved October 7, 2016.  ^ a b Beuve-Méry, Alain (January 3, 2013). " Actes Sud rachète Payot & Rivages". Le Monde. Retrieved October 7, 2016.  ^ Molga, Paul (November 11, 2012). "Le Goncourt force la croissance d'Actes Sud". Les Echos
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Éditions Du Seuil
Éditions du Seuil
Éditions du Seuil
(French pronunciation: ​[edisjɔ̃ dy sœj]) is a French publishing house created in 1935, currently owned by La Martinière Groupe. It owes its name to this goal "The seuil (threshold) is the whole excitement of parting and arriving. It is also the brand new threshold that we refashion at the door of the Church to allow entry to many whose foot gropes around it" (letter of father Plaquevent, 28 December 1934).[1]Contents1 Description 2 History 3 Collections 4 See also 5 Notes and references 6 Bibliography 7 External linksDescription[edit] Éditions du Seuil
Éditions du Seuil
was the publisher of the Don Camillo
Don Camillo
series, and of Chairman Mao Zedong's Little Red Book. The large sales that these generated have allowed the house to publish more specialized titles, particularly in the social sciences
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Franz Stangl
Sobibór, 28 April 1942 – 30 August 1942 Treblinka, 1 September 1942 – August 1943Franz Paul Stangl[1] (26 March 1908 – 28 June 1971) was an Austrian-born police officer who became an employee of the T-4 Euthanasia Program and an SS commander in Nazi Germany. He was the commandant of the Sobibór
Sobibór
and Treblinka
Treblinka
extermination camps during the Operation Reinhard
Operation Reinhard
phase of the Holocaust. He worked for Volkswagen do Brasil
Volkswagen do Brasil
and was arrested in Brazil in 1967, extradited to West Germany
West Germany
and tried for the mass murder of 900,000 people. In 1970, he was found guilty and sentenced to the maximum penalty, life imprisonment
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Éditions Stock
Stock is a French publisher, a subsidiary of Hachette Livre, which itself is part of the Lagardère Group. It was founded in the 18th century by André Cailleau, who was succeeded in 1753 by Nicolas-Bonaventure Duchesne, who published Voltaire and Rousseau. At the beginning of the 19th century, the publisher was called "Au Temple du goût". In the middle of the century it changed hands and was eventually bought up by Pierre-Victor Stock, who ran it from 1877 to 1921 and gave it its current name.Pierre-Victor StockDuring the Dreyfus affair, Stock published many essays on the subject, including Dreyfus's own Lettres d'un innocent. In his memoir Mémorandum d'un éditeur, Pierre-Victor Stock estimated that Stock had published around 150 works connected with the Dreyfus affair. In the early 20th century, Stock ran into legal and financial difficulties. It was taken over in 1921 by Maurice Delamain and Jacques Chardonne, who renamed it "Stock, Delamain et Boutelleau"
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Mediapart
Mediapart is an independent French online investigative and opinion journal created in 2008 by Edwy Plenel[1], former editor-in-chief of Le Monde. Mediapart is published in French, English and Spanish.Contents1 Description 2 Political scandals 3 References 4 External linksDescription[edit] Mediapart's income is solely derived from subscription fees; the website does not carry any advertising.[1] In 2011, Mediapart made a profit for the first time, netting €500,000 from around 60,000 subscribers.[3] Mediapart consists of two main sections: the journal itself, Le Journal, run by professional journalists, and Le Club, a collaborative forum edited by its subscriber community
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