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Domingo Ugartechea
Domingo de Ugartechea (c. 1794 – 24 May 1839) was a 19th-century Mexican Army officer for the Republic of Mexico.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early years 1.2 Siege of San Antonio 1.3 Texas Revolution2 References 3 Further readingBiography[edit] Early years[edit] Domingo de Ugartechea served for José Joaquín de Arredondo in 1813. Ugartechea as well as Antonio López de Santa Anna
Antonio López de Santa Anna
were cadets during the suppression of the Gutiérrez–Magee Expedition, and at the Battle of Medina. In June 1832, Ugartechea commanded 125 men at the fort at Velasco, Texas; he attempted to employ his artillery to prevent rebelling Texas colonist under John Austin from taking cannon from Brazoria to Anahuac at the time of the Anahuac disturbances
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Mexico
Coordinates: 23°N 102°W / 23°N 102°W / 23; -102United Mexican States Estados Unidos Mexicanos  (Spanish)FlagCoat of armsAnthem: "Himno Nacional Mexicano" (English: "Mexican National Anthem")Capital and largest city Mexico
Mexico
City 19°26′N 99°08′W / 19.433°N 99.133°W / 19.433; -99.133Official languagesNone at federal level[b] Spanish (de facto)Recognized regional languagesSpanish 68 native languages[1]National language Spanish[b]Religion83% Roman Catholicism 10% Other Christian 0.2% Other religion 5% No
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Francisco De Castañeda
Francisco de Castañeda, also spelled Castonado, was a lieutenant in the Mexican army stationed in San Antonio, in the 1830s. He was the commander of the troops involved in the first battle of the Texas Revolution. Career in Texas[edit] Castañeda was primarily charged with keeping the peace in central Texas. Chasing Indians, cattle rustlers and escorting officials were the main duties during this period. The soldiers were part of the Presidio San Antonio
San Antonio
de Bexar, who were housed in the Alamo
Alamo
fort in late 1835
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garb
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Handbook Of Texas
The Handbook of Texas
Texas
is a comprehensive encyclopedia of Texas geography, history, and historical persons published by the Texas State Historical Association (TSHA).Contents1 History 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] The original Handbook was the brainchild of TSHA President Walter Prescott Webb of The University of Texas
Texas
history department. It was published as a two-volume set in 1952, with a supplemental volume published in 1976. In 1996, the New Handbook of Texas
Texas
was published, expanding the encyclopedia to six volumes and over 23,000 articles. In 1999, the Handbook of Texas
Texas
Online went live with the complete text of the print edition, all corrections incorporated into the handbook's second printing, and about 400 articles not included in the print edition due to space limitations
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Monterrey, Nuevo León
Monterrey
Monterrey
(Spanish pronunciation: [monteˈrei] ( listen)), is the capital and largest city of the northeastern state of Nuevo León, in Mexico.[4] The city is anchor to the third-largest metropolitan area in Mexico
Mexico
and is the country's ninth-largest city.[5][6] Monterrey serves as a commercial center of northern Mexico
Mexico
and is the base of many significant international corporations. It is one of the wealthiest cities in Mexico
Mexico
with a GDP PPP of US$142 billion in 2017
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Saltillo, Coahuila
Saltillo
Saltillo
(Spanish pronunciation: [salˈtiʝo] ( listen)) is the capital of the northeastern Mexican state
Mexican state
of Coahuila
Coahuila
and the municipal seat of the municipality of the same name. As of the 2015 census, Saltillo had a population of 807,537 people, while the population of the metropolitan area was 923,636 inhabitants, making Saltillo
Saltillo
the largest city and the second largest metropolitan area in the state of Coahuila and the 19th most populated metropolitan area in the country.[3] Saltillo
Saltillo
is one of the most industrialized areas of the country and has one of the largest automotive clusters in Mexico, with plants such as Grupo Industrial Saltillo, General Motors, Fiat Group, Chrysler, Daimler, Freightliner, Delphi, Plastic Omnium, Magna, and Nemak been installed in the region
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Indigenous Peoples Of The Americas
The indigenous peoples of the Americas
Americas
are the pre-Columbian peoples of the Americas
Americas
and their descendants. Although some indigenous peoples of the Americas
Americas
were traditionally hunter-gatherers—and many, especially in the Amazon basin, still are—many groups practiced aquaculture and agriculture. The impact of their agricultural endowment to the world is a testament to their time and work in reshaping and cultivating the flora indigenous to the Americas.[24] Although some societies depended heavily on agriculture, others practiced a mix of farming, hunting and gathering
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Matamoros, Tamaulipas
Matamoros, officially known as Heroica Matamoros, is a city in the northeastern Mexican state of Tamaulipas.[2] It is located on the southern bank of the Rio Grande, directly across the border from Brownsville, Texas, in the United States.[3] Matamoros is the second largest city in the state of Tamaulipas.[4] As of 2016, Matamoros had a population of 520,367.[5] In addition, the Matamoros–Brownsville Metropolitan Area has a population of 1,387,985, [6] making it the 4th largest metropolitan area on the Mexico–US border.[7] Matamoros is the 39th largest city in Mexico
Mexico
and
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Battle Of San Jacinto
Decisive Texian victory;Mexican surrender and retreat to the south of the Rio GrandeBelligerents Mexico Texian RebelsCommanders and leadersAntonio López de Santa Anna (POW) Manuel Fernández Castrillón † Juan Almonte (POW) Martín Perfecto de Cos (POW) Sam Houston (WIA) Thomas J. Rusk James C. Neill (WIA) Mirabeau B
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Rio Grande
The Rio Grande
Rio Grande
(/ˈriːoʊ ˈɡrænd/ or /ˈriːoʊ ˈɡrɑːndeɪ/;[5][6][7] Spanish: Río Bravo del Norte, pronounced [ˈri.o ˈβɾaβo ðel ˈnorte] or simply Río Bravo) is one of the principal rivers in the southwest United States
United States
and northern Mexico
Mexico
(the other being the Colorado
Colorado
River). The Rio Grande begins in south-central Colorado
Colorado
in the United States
United States
and flows to the Gulf of Mexico.[8] Along the way, it forms part of the Mexico–United States border. According to the International Boundary and Water Commission, its total length was 1,896 miles (3,051 km) in the late 1980s, though course shifts occasionally result in length changes
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Battle Of Concepción
Concepción (Spanish for "conception," in reference to the Immaculate Conception of Mary, mother of Jesus, according to Roman Catholic Church doctrine) or Concepcion may refer to:Contents1 Cities, regions, and geographic features1.1 Argentina 1.2 Belize 1.3 Bolivia 1.4 Chile 1.5 Colombia 1.6 Guatemala 1.7 Honduras 1.8 Mexico 1.9 Nicaragua 1.10 Paraguay 1.11 Peru 1.12 Philippines 1.13 Spain 1.14 Venezuela 1.15 United States of America2 Persons 3 Ships 4 Historical events 5 See alsoCities, regions, and geographic features[edit] Argentina[edit]Concepción, Catamarca Concepción, Corrientes Concepción, Tucumán Concepción de Buena Esperanza, dead city in current Cha
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Cibolo Creek
Cibolo Creek is a stream in South Central Texas, United States that runs approximately 96 miles (154 km) from its source at Turkey Knob (in the Texas Hill Country) near Boerne, Texas, to its confluence with the San Antonio River in Karnes County. The creek serves as a tributary of the San Antonio River and forms the easternmost boundary of its watershed. The stream is used for both recreational and cartographic purposes, serving as the eastern boundary of Bexar County, Texas. A wide variety of fish and other wildlife are known to occupy the waters, and several parks have been established along its banks, including Cibolo Nature Center, Boerne City Park and Jackson Nature Center
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Stephen F. Austin
Stephen Fuller Austin (November 3, 1793 – December 27, 1836) was an American empresario. Known as the "Father of Texas", and the founder of Texas,[1][2] he led the second, and ultimately, the successful colonization of the region by bringing 300 families from the United States to the region in 1825. Born in Virginia
Virginia
and raised in southeastern Missouri, Austin served in the Missouri
Missouri
territorial legislature before moving to Arkansas Territory and later Louisiana. His father, Moses Austin, received an empresario grant from Spain
Spain
to settle Texas. After Moses Austin's death in 1821, Stephen Austin won recognition of the empresario grant from the newly-independent state of Mexico. Austin convinced numerous American settlers to move to Texas, and by 1825 Austin had brought the first 300 American families into the territory
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Texas Revolution
The Texas
Texas
Revolution
Revolution
(October 2, 1835 – April 21, 1836) was a rebellion of colonists from the United States
United States
and Tejanos (Texas Mexicans) in putting up armed resistance to the centralist government of Mexico. While the uprising was part of a larger one that included other provinces opposed to the regime of President Antonio López de Santa Anna, the Mexican government believed the United States
United States
had instigated the Texas
Texas
insurrection with the goal of annexation
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Battle Of Gonzales
The Battle of Gonzales
Battle of Gonzales
was the first military engagement of the Texas Revolution. It was fought near Gonzales, Texas, on October 2, 1835, between rebellious Texian settlers and a detachment of Mexican army soldiers . In 1831, Mexican authorities gave the settlers of Gonzales a small cannon to help protect them from frequent Comanche
Comanche
raids. Over the next four years, the political situation in Mexico
Mexico
deteriorated, and in 1835 several states revolted. As the unrest spread, Colonel Domingo de Ugartechea, the commander of all Mexican troops in Texas, felt it unwise to leave the residents of Gonzales with a weapon and requested the return of the cannon. When the initial request was refused, Ugartechea sent 100 dragoons to retrieve the cannon
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