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Domhnall, Earl Of Lennox
Mormaer
Mormaer
Domhnall of Lennox ruled Lennox in the years 1333–1365. Domhnall's reign is noted for its tension with the monarchy. King David II irritated Domhnall by residing at Dumbarton
Dumbarton
on at least twelve occasions between 1341 and 1346. Domhnall was probably one of the happier Scottish magnates when King David and his agent, Malcolm Fleming, Sheriff of Dumbarton, were captured by the English at the Battle of Neville's Cross
Battle of Neville's Cross
in 1346. Domhnall was also faced with the challenge of fending off the aggressive Stewart clan. Having no male heirs, Domhnall is credited with saving the Mormaerdom by marrying off his daughter Margaret to his kinsman Baltar mac Amlaimh, the man usually known today as Walter of Faslane
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Mormaer
In early medieval Scotland, a mormaer was the Gaelic name for a regional or provincial ruler, theoretically second only to the King of Scots, and the senior of a Taoiseach
Taoiseach
(chieftain). Mormaers were equivalent to English earls or Continental counts, and the term is often translated into English as 'earl'.Contents1 Origin 2 Earliest mormaers 3 Mormaer, comes and "earl" 4 Mormaers and other lordships 5 List of mormaers 6 Bibliography 7 External linksOrigin[edit] The etymology is variously debated as "Great Steward" (incorporating Gaelic and Picto-Latin), or "Sea Lord" (perhaps defenders against Vikings). Historians do not know whether the institution was Gaelic or Pictish. However, since mormaer occurs only in the post-Pictish period, it is difficult to argue for Pictish origins. There is also debate whether mormaer was simply the east-coast equivalent of kinglet (Gaelic: ruirí or rí)
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David II Of Scotland
David II (Medieval Gaelic: Daibhidh a Briuis, Modern Gaelic: Dàibhidh Bruis; Norman French: Dauid de Brus, Early Scots: Dauid Brus; 5 March 1324 – 22 February 1371) was King of Scots
King of Scots
from 1329 until his death, and the last male of the House of Bruce. Although David spent long periods in exile or captivity, he managed to resist English attempts to annex his kingdom, and left the monarchy in a strong position.Contents1 Early life 2 Reign2.1 Exile in France 2.2 Captivity in England 2.3 Return to Scotland3 Death 4 Fictional portrayals 5 Ancestry 6 Notes 7 References 8 Further readingEarly life[edit] David II was the elder and only surviving son of Robert I of Scotland and his second wife, Elizabeth de Burgh. He was born on 5 March 1324 at Dunfermline Abbey, Fife
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Malcolm Fleming, Earl Of Wigtown
Malcolm Fleming, Earl of Wigtown
Earl of Wigtown
(† 1363) was the son of Robert Fleming, a Stewart vassal and holder of the lands of Fulwood and Cumbernauld, who died sometime before 1314. He was the "foster-father" of King David II of Scotland
David II of Scotland
and became the first man to hold the title Earl of Wigtown. Malcolm was given the barony of Kirkintilloch
Kirkintilloch
forfeited from the Comyns by King Robert I of Scotland
Robert I of Scotland
during the First War of Scottish Independence and received other lands in Lennox and Wigtownshire. Malcolm became Sheriff of Dumbarton
Dumbarton
and keeper of the castle thereafter. Malcolm was on the defeated Bruce side at the Battle of Halidon Hill in July 1333, but managed to escape, and fled back to Dumbarton
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Battle Of Neville's Cross
The Battle of Neville's Cross
Neville's Cross
took place less than half a mile to the west of Durham, England, on 17 October 1346, within sight of the Cathedral.[4] The battle was the result of the invasion of France by England
England
whereupon, under the terms of the Auld Alliance, the Scottish invasion of northern England
England
was required during the Hundred Years' War and the Second War of Scottish Independence. The battle ended with the rout of the Scots and the capture of their king, David II of Scotland
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House Of Stewart
The House of Stuart, originally Stewart, was a European royal house that originated in Scotland. The dynasty's patrilineal Breton ancestors had held the office of High Steward of Scotland
High Steward of Scotland
since the 12th century, after arriving by way of Norman England. The royal Stewart line was founded by Robert II, and they were Kings and Queens of Scots from the late 14th century until the union with England in 1707. Mary, Queen of Scots, was brought up in France, where she adopted the French spelling of the name, Stuart. Her son, James VI of Scotland, inherited the thrones of England and Ireland upon the death of Elizabeth I in 1603. Except for the period of the Commonwealth, 1649–1660, the Stuarts were monarchs of the British Isles and its growing empire, until the death of Queen Anne in 1714.[note 3] In total, nine Stewart/Stuart monarchs ruled Scotland alone from 1371 until 1603
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Lennox (district)
Coordinates: 55°58′26″N 4°12′22″W / 55.974°N 4.206°W / 55.974; -4.206Map of Scotland
Scotland
showing the district of Lennox The Lennox
The Lennox
(Scottish Gaelic: Leamhnachd, pronounced [ʎãũnəxɡ̊]) is a region of Scotland
Scotland
centred on The Vale of Leven, including its great lake : Loch Lomond. The Gaelic name of the river is Leamhn, meaning the smooth stream, which anglicises to Leven (as Gaelic mh is spirantised). The surrounding area is the field of the smooth stream - Leamhnachd in Gaelic; this was originally anglicised as Levenauchen / Levenachs, then softened into Levenax / Lennax, and eventually the area was known simply as Lennox
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Murdoch Stewart, Duke Of Albany
Murdoch Stewart, Duke of Albany
Duke of Albany
(Scottish Gaelic: Muireadhach Stiubhart) (1362 – 24 May 1425) was a leading Scottish nobleman, the son of Robert Stewart, Duke of Albany
Duke of Albany
and the grandson of King Robert II of Scotland, who founded the Stewart dynasty. In 1389, he became Justiciar North of the Forth. In 1402, he was captured at the Battle of Homildon Hill and would spend 12 years in captivity in England. After his father died in 1420, and while the future King James I of Scotland was himself held captive in England, Stewart served as Governor of Scotland
Governor of Scotland
until 1424, when James was finally ransomed and returned to Scotland. However, in 1425, soon after James's coronation, Stewart was arrested, found guilty of treason, and executed, along with two of his sons. His only surviving heir was James the Fat, who escaped to Antrim, Ireland, where he died in 1429
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John Stewart, 1st Earl Of Lennox
John Stewart, 1st Earl of Lennox
Earl of Lennox
(b. bef. 1430, d. 8 Jul/11 Sep 1495) was known as Lord Darnley and later as the Earl of Lennox.Contents1 Family 2 Political career 3 Marriage 4 Ancestors 5 ReferencesFamily[edit] Stewart was the son of Catherine Seton and Alan Stewart of Darnley, a direct descendant of Alexander Stewart, 4th High Steward of Scotland. His paternal grandmother was the daughter and co-heiress of Donnchadh, Earl of Lennox. Through his mother he was also a descendant of Thomas Randolph, 1st Earl of Moray, nephew of King Robert I of Scotland. Through his son Matthew Stewart, 2nd Earl of Lennox, Stewart was the great-great-great-grandfather of Henry Stuart, Lord Darnley, husband of his first cousin Mary, Queen of Scots
Mary, Queen of Scots
and father of James VI, King of Scotland, who became James I, King of England
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Isabella, Countess Of Lennox
Isabella of Lennox (d.1458) was the ruler of Lennox, from 1437–1458, and last in the line of Mormaers or Native Scottish
Native Scottish
rulers. As the wife of Murdoch Stewart, 2nd Duke of Albany
Murdoch Stewart, 2nd Duke of Albany
(d.1425), she was also Duchess of Albany (1420–1425), but in 1425 her family would be almost completely destroyed when her husband, father and two sons were executed by the vengeful King James I of Scotland. Only one son, James the Fat, would escape the King's wrath, and he would die in exile in Ireland
Ireland
soon after. Isabella succeeded in escaping the fate of her family, and would eventually regain her title and estates, retiring to her castle in Loch Lomond
Loch Lomond
where she raised her grandchildren, the children of her youngest son. She would eventually live to see the violent death of her former persecutor, King James
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Robert Stewart, 1st Earl Of March
Robert Stewart, 6th Earl of Lennox
Earl of Lennox
then 1st Earl of March
Earl of March
(born circa 1522, died 29 March 1586) was a Scottish nobleman of the family of Stewart of Darnley.[1] Titles[edit] He was the second son of John Stewart, 3rd Earl of Lennox by his wife Elizabeth, daughter of John Stewart, 1st Earl of Atholl, and younger brother of Matthew Stewart, 4th Earl of Lennox. He also bore the ecclesiastical titles of Bishop of Caithness, his grant confirmed by Pope Paul III
Pope Paul III
in January 1542, an office previously held by his maternal uncle Andrew Stewart, and Commendator of St Andrews Cathedral Priory.[2] When Matthew, 4th Earl of Lennox, died in 1571, his heir was his grandson King James VI, as his eldest son Lord Darnley had died in 1567, so the title merged in the Crown
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Matthew Stewart, 2nd Earl Of Lennox
Matthew Stewart, 2nd Earl of Lennox
Earl of Lennox
(1460 – 9 September 1513, Flodden) was a prominent Scottish nobleman. Stewart was the son of John Stewart, 1st Earl
Earl
of Lennox, and Margaret Montgomerie, daughter of Alexander, Master of Montgomerie. He married firstly, on 13 June 1490, Margaret Lyle, daughter of Robert Lyle, Lord Lyle
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John Stewart, 3rd Earl Of Lennox
John Stewart, 3rd Earl of Lennox
Earl of Lennox
(c. 1490-4 September 1526, Linlithgow, West Lothian) was a prominent Scottish magnate. He was the son of Matthew Stewart, 2nd Earl of Lennox
Earl of Lennox
and Lady Elizabeth Hamilton, daughter of James Hamilton, 1st Lord Hamilton and Mary Stewart, Princess of Scotland, daughter of King James II of Scotland. The Earl of Lennox
Earl of Lennox
led an army to Linlithgow
Linlithgow
with the intention of liberating the young King James V of Scotland
James V of Scotland
from the pro-English Douglases. He was defeated by a smaller force led by James Hamilton, 1st Earl
Earl
of Arran, at the Battle of Linlithgow
Linlithgow
Bridge. He survived the battle and was taken captive, only to be subsequently murdered by James Hamilton of Finnart
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Matthew Stewart, 4th Earl Of Lennox
Matthew Stewart, 4th Earl of Lennox
Earl of Lennox
[1] (21 September 1516 – 4 September 1571) was the fourth Earl of Lennox, and a leader of the Catholic
Catholic
nobility in Scotland. He was the son of John Stewart, 3rd Earl of Lennox
Earl of Lennox
and Lady Elizabeth Stewart, daughter of John Stewart, 1st Earl of Atholl. His grandson was King James VI of Scotland
James VI of Scotland
and I of England.Contents1 Conflict with Regent
Regent
Arran (1543–1547) 2 Marriage and later life 3 Ancestors 4 ReferencesConflict with Regent
Regent
Arran (1543–1547)[edit] Matthew Stewart succeeded as Earl of Lennox
Earl of Lennox
upon the death of his father on 4 September 1526
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