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Domestic Policy Of The Ronald Reagan Administration
Governor of CaliforniaGovernorship 1976 General electionPrimaries Convention40th President of the United StatesPresidencyTimelinePoliciesDomesticReaganomicsForeignReagan DoctrineInternational tripsAppointmentsCabinet Judicial appointmentsFirst TermCampaign for the Presidency 1980 general electionPrimaries Convention1st inauguration Assassination attemptInvasion of Grenada Cold WarSecond TermRe-election campaign1984 general election Primaries Convention2nd inaugurationCold War Libya bombing Challenger disaster Iran–Contra affair "Tear down this wall!" INF TreatyPost-PresidencyPresidential Library Medal of Freedom BibliographyAn American Life The Reagan DiariesAlzheimer's diagnosis State funeralLegacySpeeches and debates"A Time for Choosing"Reagan Era Reagan Awardv t eThis article discusses the domestic policy of the Ronald Reagan administration from 1981 to 1989
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Free Markets
In economics, a free market is an idealized system in which the prices for goods and services are determined by the open market and consumers, in which the laws and forces of supply and demand are free from any intervention by a government, price-setting monopoly, or other authority. Proponents of the concept of free market contrast it with a regulated market, in which a government intervenes in supply and demand through various methods such as tariffs used to restrict trade and protect the economy. In an idealized free market economy, prices for goods and services are set freely by the forces of supply and demand and are allowed to reach their point of equilibrium without intervention by government policy. In scholarly debates, the concept of a free market is contrasted with the concept of a coordinated market in fields of study such as political economy, new institutional economics, economic sociology, and political science
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Federalism
Federalism
Federalism
is the mixed or compound mode of government, combining a general government (the central or 'federal' government) with regional governments (provincial, state, cantonal, territorial or other sub-unit governments) in a single political system
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Sandra Day O'Connor
Sandra Day O'Connor
Sandra Day O'Connor
(born March 26, 1930) is a retired Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, serving from her appointment in 1981 by Ronald Reagan
Ronald Reagan
to 2006. She is the first woman to serve on the Court.[5] Prior to O'Connor's tenure on the Court, she was an elected official and judge in Arizona
Arizona
serving as the first female Majority Leader of a state senate as the Republican leader in the Arizona
Arizona
Senate.[6] Upon her nomination to the Court, O'Connor was confirmed unanimously by the Senate
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Cultural Depictions Of Ronald Reagan
Culture
Culture
(/ˈkʌltʃər/) is the social behavior and norms found in human societies. Culture
Culture
is considered a central concept in anthropology, encompassing the range of phenomena that are transmitted through social learning in human societies. Some aspects of human behavior, social practices such as culture, expressive forms such as art, music, dance, ritual, religion, and technologies such as tool usage, cooking, shelter, and clothing are said to be cultural universals, found in all human societies
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United States Supreme Court
The Supreme Court of the United States
United States
(sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS[2]) is the highest federal court of the United States. Established pursuant to Article Three of the United States Constitution in 1789, it has ultimate (and largely discretionary) appellate jurisdiction over all federal courts and state court cases involving issues of federal law plus original jurisdiction over a small range of cases. In the legal system of the United States, the Supreme Court is generally the final interpreter of federal law including the United States
United States
Constitution, but it may act only within the context of a case in which it has jurisdiction
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Military Budget Of The United States
The military budget is the portion of the discretionary United States federal budget allocated to the Department of Defense, or more broadly, the portion of the budget that goes to any military-related expenditures. The military budget pays the salaries, training, and health care of uniformed and civilian personnel, maintains arms, equipment and facilities, funds operations, and develops and buys new items. The budget funds four branches of the U.S. military: the Army, Marine Corps, Navy, and Air Force. In FY 2015, Pentagon and related spending totaled $598 billion, about 54% of the fiscal year 2015 U.S. discretionary budget
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Supply-side Economics
Supply-side economics
Supply-side economics
is a macroeconomic theory that argues economic growth can be most effectively created by lowering taxes and decreasing regulation.[1][2] According to supply-side economics, consumers will then benefit from a greater supply of goods and services at lower prices and employment will increase.[3] It was started by economist Robert Mundell
Robert Mundell
during the Ronald Reagan administration. The Laffer curve
Laffer curve
is one of the main theoretical constructs of supply-side economics, the idea that lower tax rates when tax level is too high will actually boost government revenue because of higher economic growth.[4] The term "supply-side economics" was thought for some time to have been coined by journalist Jude Wanniski in 1975, but according to Robert D. Atkinson
Robert D

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List Of Personal Coats Of Arms Of Presidents Of The United States
Many United States
United States
presidents have borne a coat of arms; largely through inheritance, assumption, or grants from foreign heraldic authorities
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President Of The United States
House of RepresentativesSpeaker Paul Ryan
Paul Ryan
(R)Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R)Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi
Nancy Pelosi
(D)Co
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Cold War (1979–85)
Part of a series on the History of the Cold WarOrigins of the Cold WarWorld War II (Hiroshima and Nagasaki) War conferences Eastern Bloc Western Bloc Iron Curtain Cold War
Cold War
(1947–1953) Cold War
Cold War
(1953–1962) Cold War
Cold War
(1962–1979) Cold War
Cold War
(1979–1985) Cold War
Cold War
(1985–1991)Frozen conflictsTimeline  · Conflicts HistoriographyThe Cold War
Cold War
(1979–1985) refers to the phase of a deterioration in relations between the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
and the West arising from the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan in December 1979
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Cold War (1985–91)
Part of a series on the History of the Cold WarOrigins of the Cold WarWorld War II (Hiroshima and Nagasaki) War conferences Eastern Bloc Western Bloc Iron Curtain Cold War
Cold War
(1947–1953) Cold War
Cold War
(1953–1962) Cold War
Cold War
(1962–1979) Cold War
Cold War
(1979–1985) Cold War
Cold War
(1985–1991)Frozen conflictsTimeline  · Conflicts HistoriographyThe Cold War
Cold War
period of 1985–1991 began with the rise of Mikhail Gorbachev as leader of the Soviet Union. Gorbachev was a revolutionary leader for the USSR, as he was the first to promote liberalization of the political landscape (Glasnost) and capitalist elements into the economy (Perestroika); prior to this, the USSR
USSR
had been strictly prohibiting liberal reform and maintained an inefficient centralized economy
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1986 United States Bombing Of Libya
American victory[1]Ground targets destroyed Failed Libyan Scud
Scud
missile responseBelligerents United States LibyaCommanders and leaders Ronald Reagan Muammar GaddafiCasualties and losses1 F-111
F-111
shot down 2 aircrew killed 45 soldiers and officials killed 15–30 Libyan civilians killed 3–5 IL-76 transports destroyed 14 MiG-23s destroyed 2 helicopters destroyed 5 major ground radars destroyed[2]v t eClashes between Libya
Libya
and the United States1st Gulf of Sidra Gulf of Sidra
Gulf of Sidra
(naval) 1986 West Berlin discotheque bombing 1986 bombing of Libya 2nd Gulf of Sidra 2011 bombing of LibyaThe 1986 United States
United States
bombing of Libya, code-named Operation El Dorado Canyon, comprised air strikes by the United States
United States
against Libya
Libya
on Tuesday, 15 April 1986
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List Of International Presidential Trips Made By Ronald Reagan
The president is a common title for the head of state in most republics. In politics, president is a title given to leaders of republican states. The functions exercised by a president vary according to the form of government. In parliamentary and semi-presidential republics, they are limited to those of the head of state, and are thus largely ceremonial. In presidential republics, the role of the president is more prominent, encompassing also (in most cases) the functions of the head of government
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Presidential Medal Of Freedom
The Presidential Medal of Freedom
Medal of Freedom
is an award bestowed by the President of the United States
President of the United States
and is—along with the comparable Congressional Gold Medal—the highest civilian award of the United States. It recognizes those people who have made "an especially meritorious contribution to the security or national interests of the United States, world peace, cultural or other significant public or private endeavors".[2] The award is not limited to U.S. citizens and, while it is a civilian award, it can also be awarded to military personnel and worn on the uniform. It was established in 1963 by President John F. Kennedy,[3] superseding the Medal of Freedom
Medal of Freedom
that was established by President Harry S. Truman
Harry S

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Iran–Contra Affair
The Iran–Contra affair
Iran–Contra affair
(Persian: ماجرای ایران-کنترا‎, Spanish: caso Irán-Contra), also referred to as Irangate,[1] Contragate[2] or the Iran–Contra scandal, was a political scandal in the United States
United States
that occurred during the second term of the Reagan Administration. Senior administration officials secretly facilitated the sale of arms to Iran, which was the subject of an arms embargo.[3] They hoped, thereby, to fund the Contras
Contras
in Nicaragua
Nicaragua
while at the same time negotiating the release of several U.S. hostages
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