HOME TheInfoList
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff







picture info

Domesday Book

Domesday Book (/ˈdmzd/ or US: /ˈdmzd/;[1][2] Latin: Liber de Wintonia "Book of Winchester") is a manuscript record of the "Great Survey" of much of England and parts of Wales completed in 1086 by order of King William the Conqueror
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

United Kingdom Of Great Britain And Ireland

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland was a sovereign state that existed between 1801 and 1922. It was established by the Acts of Union 1800, which merged the kingdoms of Great Britain and Ireland into a unified state. The establishment of the Irish Free State in 1922 led to the country later being renamed to the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in 1927, which continues to exist in the present day. The United Kingdom, having financed the European coalition that defeated France during the Napoleonic Wars, developed a large Royal Navy that enabled the British Empire to become the foremost world power for the next century. The Crimean War with Russia was a relatively small operation in a century where Britain was largely at peace with the Great Powers.[3] Rapid industrialisation that began in the decades prior to the state's formation continued up until the mid-19th century
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

County Durham

County Durham (/ˈdʌrəm/, locally /ˈdɜrəm/listen) is a county in North East England.[2] The county town is Durham, a cathedral city. County Durham can refer to the unitary authority, ceremonial county or historic county with differing boundaries. The area of the unitary authority, Durham County Council, does not include boroughs in the Tees Valley region and includes land south of the Tees in Upper Teesdale. The largest settlement in the ceremonial county is Darlington, closely followed by Hartlepool, Billingham and Stockton-on-Tees. The ceremonial borders are shared with Tyne and Wear to the north-east, Northumberland to the north, Cumbria to the west and North Yorkshire to the south.[3] The historic county's boundaries stretch between the rivers Tyne and Tees, including settlements of Gateshead, Jarrow, South Shields and Sunderland
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Winchester
Winchester is a cathedral city and the county town of Hampshire, England. The city is at the heart of the wider City of Winchester, a local government district, at the western end of the South Downs National Park, on the River Itchen.[2] It is 60 miles (97 km) south-west of London and 14 miles (23 km) from Southampton, the closest other city. At the 2011 Census, Winchester had a population of 45,184. The wider City of Winchester district, which includes towns such as Alresford and Bishop's Waltham, has a population of 116,595.[3] Winchester developed from the Roman town of Venta Belgarum, which in turn developed from an Iron Age oppidum. Winchester's major landmark is Winchester Cathedral, one of the largest cathedrals in Europe, with the distinction of having the longest nave and overall length of all Gothic cathedrals in Europe
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



County Palatine Of Durham
The County Palatine of Durham was an area in the North of England that was controlled by the Bishop of Durham. The territory was originally the Liberty of Durham under the control of the Bishop of Durham. The liberty was also known variously as the "Liberty of St Cuthbert's Land", "The lands of St. Cuthbert between Tyne and Tees" or "The Liberty of Haliwerfolc".[1] The bishops' special jurisdiction was based on claims that King Ecgfrith of Northumbria had granted a substantial territory to St Cuthbert on his election to the see of Lindisfarne in 684. In about 883, a cathedral housing the saint's remains was established at Chester-le-Street and Guthfrith, King of York granted the community of St Cuthbert the area between the Tyne and the Wear. In 995 the see was moved again to Durham. Following the Norman invasion, the administrative machinery of government was only slowly extended to northern England
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Essex

Essex (/ˈɛsɪks/) is a county in the east[3][4] of England, north-east of London. One of the home counties, it borders Suffolk and Cambridgeshire to the north, Hertfordshire to the west, Kent across the estuary of the River Thames to the south and London to the south-west. The county town is Chelmsford, the only city in the county. For government statistical purposes, Essex is placed in the East of England region, where the inclusion of Essex is one of the main differences between the modern and the historical region. There are four definitions of the extent of Essex, the widest being the Ancient County
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Warwickshire

Warwickshire (/ˈwɒrɪkʃər, -ʃɪər/ (listen); abbreviated Warks) is a county in the West Midlands region of England. The county town is Warwick, and the largest town is Nuneaton. The county is famous for being the birthplace of William Shakespeare at Stratford-upon-Avon.[3] Other significant towns in the county include Rugby, Leamington Spa, Bedworth and Kenilworth. The county is divided into five districts of North Warwickshire, Nuneaton and Bedworth, Rugby, Warwick and Stratford-on-Avon. The current county boundaries were set in 1974 by the Local Government Act 1972
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Doomsday Book (film)
Doomsday Book (Korean인류멸망보고서; RRInryu myeongmang bogoseo; lit. "Report on the Destruction of Mankind") is a 2012 South Korean science-fiction anthology film directed by Kim Jee-woon and Yim Pil-sung. It tells three unique stories of human self-destruction in the modern high-tech era, while displaying an alternative form of genuine humanity and compassion. A Brave New World is a political satire about a viral zombie outbreak; The Heavenly Creature philosophizes on whether a robot can achieve enlightenment; and in Happy Birthday a dysfunctional family bonds in the midst of an apocalypse.[1][2][3] It won the top prize at the 2012 Fantasia Festival
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Last Judgement
The Last Judgment[a] or The Day of the Lord (Hebrew: יום הדין‎, romanizedYom ha-din, Arabic: یوم القيامة‎, romanizedYawm al-qiyāmah, lit. 'Day of Resurrection' or Arabic: یوم الدین‎, romanizedYawm ad-din, lit. 'Day of Judgement') is part of the eschatological world view of the Abrahamic religions and in the Frashokereti of Zoroastrianism. Some Christian denominations consider the Second Coming of Christ to be the final and infinite judgment by God of the people in every nation[1] resulting in the approval of some and the penalizing of others. The concept is found in all the Canonical gospels, particularly the Gospel of Matthew. Christian Futurists believe it will take place after the Resurrection of the Dead and the Second Coming of Christ while Full Preterists believe it has already occurred
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Dialogus De Scaccario
The Dialogus de Scaccario, or Dialogue concerning the Exchequer, is a mediaeval treatise on the practice of the English Exchequer written in the late 12th century by Richard FitzNeal. The treatise, written in Latin,[1] and known from four manuscripts from the 13th century[2] is set up as a series of questions and answers, covering the jurisdiction, constitution and practice of the Exchequer. One academic said that "The value of this essay for early English history cannot be over-estimated; in every direction it throws light upon the existing state of affairs."[3] It has been repeatedly republished and translated, most recently in 2007. The treatise was most likely written by Richard FitzNeal, Lord High Treasurer of the Exchequer under Henry II
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Middle English
Middle English (abbreviated to ME[2]) was a form of the English language spoken after the Norman conquest (1066) until the late 15th century. English underwent distinct variations and developments following the Old English period. Scholarly opinion varies, but the Oxford English Dictionary specifies the period when Middle English was spoken as being from 1150 to 1500.[3] This stage of the development of the English language roughly followed the High to the Late Middle Ages. Middle English saw significant changes to its vocabulary, grammar, pronunciation, and orthography. Writing conventions during the Middle English period varied widely. Examples of writing from this period that have survived show extensive regional variation
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Fiefdom
A fief (/ff/; Latin: feudum) was the central element of feudalism. It consisted of heritable property or rights granted by an overlord to a vassal who held it in fealty (or "in fee") in return for a form of feudal allegiance and service, usually given by the personal ceremonies of homage and fealty. The fees were often lands or revenue-producing real property held in feudal land tenure: these are typically known as fiefs or fiefdoms. However, not only land but anything of value could be held in fee, including governmental office, rights of exploitation such as hunting or fishing, monopolies in trade, and tax farms.[citation needed] In ancient Rome, a "benefice" (from the Latin noun beneficium, meaning "benefit") was a gift of land (precaria) for life as a reward for services rendered, originally, to the state
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Devon

Devon (/ˈdɛvən/, also known as Devonshire) is a county of England, reaching from the Bristol Channel in the north to the English Channel in the south. It is part of South West England, bounded by Cornwall to the west, Somerset to the north-east and Dorset to the east. The city of Exeter is the county town. The county includes the districts of East Devon, Mid Devon, North Devon, South Hams, Teignbridge, Torridge and West Devon. Plymouth and Torbay are each geographically part of Devon, but are administered as unitary authorities.[4] Combined as a ceremonial county, Devon's area is 6,707 km2 (2,590 square miles)[5] and its population is about 1.1 million. Devon derives its name from Dumnonia
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Knight's Fee
In feudal Anglo-Norman England and Ireland, a knight's fee was a unit measure of land deemed sufficient to support a knight. Of necessity, it would not only provide sustenance for himself, his family, esquires and servants, but also the means to furnish himself and his retinue with horses and armour to fight for his overlord in battle. It was effectively the size of a fee (or "fief" which is synonymous with "fee") sufficient to support one knight in the ongoing performance of his feudal duties (knight-service). A knight's fee cannot be stated as a standard number of acres as the required acreage to produce a given crop or revenue would vary depending on many factors, including its location, the richness of its soil and the local climate, as well as the presence of other exploitable resources such as fish-weirs, quarries of rock or mines of minerals
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]