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Djelfa
Djelfa
Djelfa
(Arabic: الجلفة‎, translit. al-Ǧilfah is the capital city of Djelfa
Djelfa
Province, Algeria
Algeria
and the site of ancient city and former bishopric Fallaba, which remains a Latin catholic titular see. It has a population of 339,248 (2008 census). The city lies at the junction of the N1 and the N46 roads.Contents1 Geography 2 Climate 3 History 4 Ecclesiastical history4.1 Titular see5 Culture 6 Climate 7 References 8 Sources and external linksGeography[edit] Djelfa
Djelfa
is located at an elevation of 3,734 feet (1,138 m) in the Ouled Naïl Range of north-central Algeria, between the towns of Bousaada and Laghouat
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Classical Antiquity
Classical antiquity
Classical antiquity
(also the classical era, classical period or classical age) is the long period of cultural history centered on the Mediterranean
Mediterranean
Sea, comprising the interlocking civilizations of ancient Greece and ancient Rome, collectively known as the Greco-Roman world. It is the period in which Greek and Roman society flourished and wielded great influence throughout Europe, North Africa
North Africa
and Western Asia. Conventionally, it is taken to begin with the earliest-recorded Epic Greek poetry of Homer
Homer
(8th–7th century BC), and continues through the emergence of Christianity
Christianity
and the decline of the Roman Empire (5th century AD)
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Late Antiquity
Late antiquity
Late antiquity
is a periodization used by historians to describe the time of transition from classical antiquity to the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
in mainland Europe, the Mediterranean
Mediterranean
world, and the Near East. The development of the periodization has generally been accredited to historian Peter Brown, after the publication of his seminal work The World of Late Antiquity (1971). Precise boundaries for the period are a continuing matter of debate, but Brown proposes a period between the 3rd and 8th centuries AD. Generally, it can be thought of as from the end of the Roman Empire's Crisis of the Third Century
Crisis of the Third Century
(c. 235 – 284) to, in the East, the Muslim conquests
Muslim conquests
in the mid-7th century
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Fatimid Caliphate
The Fatimid
Fatimid
Caliphate
Caliphate
(Arabic: الفاطميون‎, al-Fāṭimīyūn) was an Ismaili
Ismaili
Shia
Shia
Islamic caliphate that spanned a large area of North Africa, from the Red Sea
Red Sea
in the east to the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
in the west. The dynasty of Arab origin[4][5] ruled across the Mediterranean
Mediterranean
coast of Africa and ultimately made Egypt
Egypt
the centre of the caliphate. At its height the caliphate included in addition to Egypt
Egypt
varying areas of the Maghreb, Sudan, Sicily, the Levant, and Hijaz. The Fatimids
Fatimids
claimed descent from Fatimah, the daughter of Islamic prophet Muhammad
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Banu Hilal
The Banu Hilal
Banu Hilal
(Arabic: بنو هلال or الهلاليين) was a confederation of tribes of Arabia from the Hejaz
Hejaz
and Najd
Najd
regions of the Arabian Peninsula
Arabian Peninsula
that emigrated to North Africa
North Africa
in the 11th century. Masters of the vast plateaux of Najd, they enjoyed a somewhat infamous reputation, possibly owing to their relatively late (for the Arabian tribes) conversion to Islam and accounts of their campaigns in the borderlands between Iraq and Syria. With the revolutionary movement of the Qarmatians
Qarmatians
in Bahrain
Bahrain
and Oman, they participated in the pillage of Mecca
Mecca
in 930 in their fight against the Fatimid Caliphate
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Tripolitania
Tripolitania
Tripolitania
/trɪpɒlɪˈteɪniə/ or Tripolitana (Arabic: طرابلس‎ Ṭarābulus, Berber: Ṭrables, from Vulgar Latin *Trapoletanius, from Latin
Latin
Regio Tripolitana, from Greek Τριπολιτάνια) is a historic region and former province of Libya. Tripolitania
Tripolitania
was a separate Italian colony from 1927 to 1934
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Tunisia
Islam
Islam
(state religion; 99.1% Sunni[9] others (1%; including Christian, Jewish, Shia, Bahá'í)[9]Demonym TunisianGovernment Unitary semi-presidential republic[12][13]• PresidentBeji Caid Essebsi• Head of GovernmentYoussef ChahedLegislature Assembly of the Representatives of the PeopleFormation•  Husainid Dynasty
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Zirid Dynasty
The Zirid dynasty
Zirid dynasty
(Berber languages: ⵉⵣⵉⵔⵉⴻⵏ Tagelda en Ayt Ziri, Arabic: زيريون‎ /ALA-LC: Zīryūn; Banu Ziri), was a Sanhaja
Sanhaja
Berber dynasty from current Algeria, which ruled the central Maghreb
Maghreb
from 972 to 1014 and Ifriqiya
Ifriqiya
(eastern Maghreb) from 972 to 1148.[3][6] Descendants of Ziri ibn Menad, a military leader who rallied to the Cairo-based Fatimid Caliphate
Fatimid Caliphate
and gave his name to the dynasty, the Zirids were Emirs who ruled in the name of the Fatimids. They gradually established their autonomy until officially breaking with the Fatimids
Fatimids
in the mid-11th century
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Philippe Pétain
World War IBattle of VerdunRif WarsHenri Philippe Benoni Omer Joseph Pétain (24 April 1856 – 23 July 1951), generally known as Philippe Pétain
Philippe Pétain
(French: [fi.lip pe.tɛ̃]) or Marshal Pétain (Maréchal Pétain), was a French general officer who attained the position of Marshal of France
Marshal of France
and subsequently served as the Chief of State of Vichy France
Vichy France
from 1940 to 1944. Pétain, who was 84 years old in 1940, ranks as France's oldest head of state. Today, he is considered a Nazi collaborator, the French equivalent of his contemporary Vidkun Quisling
Vidkun Quisling
in Norway
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Vandal Kingdom
Vandaliric435 AD–534 ADCoin depicting Gelimer
Gelimer
(530–534)Greatest extent of the Vandal Kingdom
Vandal Kingdom
c
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Cathedra
A cathedra (Latin, "chair", from Greek, καθέδρα kathédra, "seat") or bishop's throne is the seat of a bishop. It is a symbol of the bishop's teaching authority in the Catholic Church, the Orthodox Church, and the Anglican Communion
Anglican Communion
churches
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Bishopric
The word diocese (/ˈdaɪəsɪs, -siːs, -siːz/)[a] is derived from the Greek term διοίκησις meaning "administration". When now used in an ecclesiastical sense, it refers to an administrative territorial entity.[2] In the Western Church, the district is under the supervision of a bishop (who may have assistant bishops to help him or her) and is divided into parishes under the care of priests; but in the Eastern Church, the word denotes the area under the jurisdiction of a patriarch and the bishops under his jurisdiction administer parishes.[2] This structure of church governance is known as episcopal polity. The word diocesan means relating or pertaining to a diocese. It can also be used as a noun meaning the bishop who has the principal supervision of a diocese
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Roman Empire
Mediolanum
Mediolanum
(286–402, Western) Augusta Treverorum Sirmium Ravenna
Ravenna
(402–476, Western)
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Roman Province
In Ancient Rome, a province (Latin: provincia, pl. provinciae) was the basic, and, until the Tetrarchy
Tetrarchy
(293 AD), largest territorial and administrative unit of the empire's territorial possessions outside Italy. The word province in modern English has its origins in the term used by the Romans. Provinces were generally governed by politicians of senatorial rank, usually former consuls or former praetors. A later exception was the province of Egypt, incorporated by Augustus
Augustus
after the death of Cleopatra: it was ruled by a governor of equestrian rank only, perhaps as a discouragement to senatorial ambition
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Suffragan Bishop
A suffragan bishop is a bishop subordinate to a metropolitan bishop or diocesan bishop. They may be assigned to an area which does not have a cathedral of its own.Contents1 Anglican
Anglican
Communion1.1 England1.1.1 History 1.1.2 Today1.1.2.1 Area bishops 1.1.2.2 Suffragan bishops1.2 Wales 1.3 Ireland 1.4 United States 1.5 Acting bishops2 Roman Catholic Church 3 See also 4 References Anglican
Anglican
Communion[edit] In the Anglican
Anglican
churches, the term applies to a bishop who is an assistant to a diocesan bishop
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