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Districts Of Kyrgyzstan
The regions of Kyrgyzstan
Kyrgyzstan
are divided into districts (raions), administered by government-appointed officials. Rural communities (aiyl okmotus) consisting of up to twenty small settlements have their own elected mayors and councils
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Mayor
In many countries, a mayor (from the Latin
Latin
maior [majˈjɔr], meaning "bigger") is the highest-ranking official in a municipal government such as that of a city or a town. Worldwide, there is a wide variance in local laws and customs regarding the powers and responsibilities of a mayor as well as the means by which a mayor is elected or otherwise mandated. Depending on the system chosen, a mayor may be the chief executive officer of the municipal government, may simply chair a multi-member governing body with little or no independent power, or may play a solely ceremonial role
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Foreign Relations Of Kyrgyzstan
Kyrgyzstan favors close relations with other members of the Commonwealth of Independent States, particularly Kazakhstan and Russia. While Kyrgyzstan was initially determined to stay in the ruble zone, the stringent conditions set forth by the Russian Government prompted Kyrgyzstan to introduce its own currency, the som, in May 1993. Kyrgyzstan's withdrawal from the ruble zone was done with little prior notification and initially caused tensions in the region. Both Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan temporarily suspended trade, and Uzbekistan even introduced restrictions tantamount to economic sanctions. Both nations feared an influx of rubles and an increase in inflation. Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan's hostility toward Kyrgyzstan was short-lived, and the three nations signed an agreement in January 1994 creating an economic union. This led to the relaxation of border restrictions between the nations the following month
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Pulgon
Pulgon
Pulgon
(Russian: Пульгон, Pul'gon) is a village in Batken Region of Kyrgyzstan. It is the administrative center of the Kadamjay District of this region. Its population was 2,466 in 2009.[1] In the Soviet era, the village was officially known as Frunzenskoye, and the district was known as Frunzensky District (Frunze District) of Osh Region. The village is located next to Kyrgyzstan's border with Uzbekistan. The antimony miners' town of Kadamjay
Kadamjay
(formerly known as Frunze) is immediately adjacent to the village from the south. Another nearby town is Orozbekovo
Orozbekovo
(6 miles). References[edit]^ "2009 population census of the Kyrgyz Republic: Batken Region" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 10 August 2011
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Lebedinovka
Lebedinovka (Russian: Лебединовка) is a village on the outskirts of the Kyrgyz capital Bishkek. Administratively, however, it is not part of the city, but is the center of the Alamüdün District of Chuy Region, which surrounds Bishkek. Lebedinovka was established in 1898.[1] Its population was 20,709 in 2009.[2] References[edit]^ Чүй облусу:Энциклопедия [Encyclopedia of Chuy Oblast] (in Kyrgyz and Russian). Bishkek: Chief Editorial Board of Kyrgyz Encyclopedia. 1994. p. 718. ISBN 5897500835.  ^ "2009 population census of the Kyrgyz Republic: Chuy Region" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 10 August 2011
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Batken
Batken
Batken
(also called Batkent) is a small town in southwestern Kyrgyzstan, on the southern fringe of the Fergana Valley. It is the capital of Batken
Batken
Region. Its area is 205 square kilometres (79 sq mi), and its resident population was 19,718 in 2009 (both including the villages Bulak-Bashi, Kyzyl-Jol and Bazar-Bashy). The population of the town proper was 13,435.[1] History[edit] The name Batkent is from the Iranian language of Sogdian and means "The city of wind"
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Kara-Balta
Kara-Balta ('black ax', Russian/Kyrgyz: Кара-Балта) is a city and municipality on the Kara-Balta River, in Chuy Region, Kyrgyzstan, the capital of Jayyl District. It was founded in 1825 under the Kokand Khanate, and received city status in 1975 under the Soviets. Its city population was officially 37,834 in the 2009 census.[1] The municipality had a population of 54,200 according to the Soviet 1989 census. Kara-Balta is located on the northern slopes of the Kyrgyz Ala-Too, in the western part of Chuy Region, 62 km west of the capital of Bishkek. The road continues west through Kaindy toward Taraz, Kazakhstan. Another road goes south through the Töö-Ashuu Pass and then splits, one branch going west to Talas Province and the other south and then east through the Suusamyr valley to Balykchy on Lake Issyk Kul. It has a temperate climate
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Local Government
A local government is a form of public administration which, in a majority of contexts, exists as the lowest tier of administration within a given state. The term is used to contrast with offices at state level, which are referred to as the central government, national government, or (where appropriate) federal government and also to supranational government which deals with governing institutions between states. Local governments generally act within powers delegated to them by legislation or directives of the higher level of government. In federal states, local government generally comprises the third (or sometimes fourth) tier of government, whereas in unitary states, local government usually occupies the second or third tier of government, often with greater powers than higher-level administrative divisions. The question of municipal autonomy is a key question of public administration and governance
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Politics Of Kyrgyzstan
The Politics of Kyrgyzstan, officially known as the Kyrgyz Republic takes place in the framework of a parliamentary representative democratic republic, whereby the President is head of state and the Prime Minister of Kyrgyzstan
Kyrgyzstan
is head of government. Executive power is exercised by the government. Legislative power
Legislative power
is vested in both the government and parliament
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Raion
A raion (also rayon) is a type of administrative unit of several post-Soviet states (such as part of an oblast). The term is from the French "rayon" (meaning "honeycomb, department"),[1] which is both a type of a subnational entity and a division of a city, and is commonly translated in English as "district".[2] The term "raion" also can be used simply as a kind of administrative division without anything to do with ethnicity or nationality. A raion is a standardized administrative entity across most of the former Soviet Union
Soviet Union
and is usually a subdivision two steps below the national level. However, in smaller USSR republics, it could be the primary level of administrative division (Administrative divisions of Armenia, Administrative divisions of Azerbaijan)
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Kemin
Kemin (previous name "Bystrovka") is a city in northeastern Kyrgyzstan, the administrative headquarters of Kemin District in Chuy Region. Its population was 8,169 in 2009.[1] It is located about 95 km eastward of Bishkek on the left bank of the Chu River in the Chuy Valley. Kemin was established in 1912.[2] Kemin received city right in 2012.[3] Notable people[edit]Askar Akayevich Akayev (November 10, 1944 -), first President of the Kyrgyz Republic,References[edit]^ a b "2009 population census of the Kyrgyz Republic: Chuy Region" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 10 August 2011. Retrieved 2010-03-12.  ^ Чүй облусу:Энциклопедия [Encyclopedia of Chuy Oblast] (in Kyrgyz and Russian). Bishkek: Chief Editorial Board of Kyrgyz Encyclopedia. 1994. p. 718
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Kyrgyz Revolution Of 2010
In political science, a revolution (Latin: revolutio, "a turn around") is a fundamental change in political power and political organization, which occurs relatively quickly when the population revolt against their oppression (political, social, economic) by the incumbent government.[1] In book V of the Politics, the Ancient Greek philosopher Aristotle
Aristotle
(384–322 BC) described two types of political revolution:Complete change from one constitution to another Modification of an existing constitution.[2]Revolutions have occurred through human history and vary widely in terms of methods, duration, and motivating ideology. Their results include major changes in culture, economy, and socio-political institutions, usually in response to overwhelming autocracy or plutocracy. Scholarly debates about what does and does not constitute a revolution center on several issues
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Tulip Revolution
The Tulip
Tulip
Revolution or First Kyrgyz Revolution led to President of Kyrgyzstan, Askar Akayev's fall from power. The revolution began after parliamentary elections on February 27 and March 13, 2005. The revolutionaries alleged corruption and authoritarianism by Akayev, his family and supporters. Akayev
Akayev
fled to Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan
and then to Russia. On April 4, 2005, at the Kyrgyz embassy in Moscow, Akayev
Akayev
signed his resignation statement in the presence of a Kyrgyz parliamentary delegation
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Belovodskoye
Belovodskoye (Russian: Беловодское) is a town in the Chuy Region of Kyrgyzstan. Its population was 21,275 in 2009.[1] It is the capital of Moskva District, and is located on the European route E40 (M39) Bishkek to Chimkent highway. History[edit] Belovodskoye was established by 12 families of back settlers from Astrakhan Governorate of Russian Empire in spring 1868. The settlement was called Belovodskoye (White river in Russian) by the name of the Ak-Suu River (White river in Kyrgyz) close to which it was laid. The first street in the village was named Astrakhan. Later the settlers from other areas of the empire mostly from Voronezh Governorate and Orel Governorate joined them. They were followed by more peasants from Poltava Governorate, Kharkov Governorate, and Saratov Governorate
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Kaindy
Kaindy (Kyrgyz: Кайыңды; Russian: Каинды; sometimes written: Kayyngdy) is a city in the Chuy Region of Kyrgyzstan. It became a city in 2012.[2] Its population was 7,526 in 2009.[1] It is the capital of Panfilov District, Kyrgyzstan. It features the railroad station closest to the Kazakhstan border on the north route of the Kyrgyz Railways and is the first town one enters when traveling to Kyrgyzstan by train. Sources[edit]^ a b "2009 population census of the Kyrgyz Republic: Chuy Region" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 10 August 2011
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Sokuluk
Sokuluk (Dungan: Сохўлў, Sohwlw; Kyrgyz, Russian: Сокулук) is a large village in the Chuy Region of Kyrgyzstan. Divided over two rural communities, its total population was 24,417 in 2009.[1] Sokuluk is the administrative center of Sokuluk District, and is located about 5 km west from the town of Shopokov, the main economic center of the area.[2] History[edit] According to historians, Sokuluk started its existence in the early 1880s, as a place of settlement of many of the Dungan people who moved to the Russian Empire from the Kulja (Yining) area between 1881 and 1883, after Russia agreed to withdraw its troops from Kulja pursuant to the Treaty of Saint Petersburg (1881)
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