HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

District Of Columbia Public Library
The District of Columbia
District of Columbia
Public Library (DCPL) is the public library system for residents of Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
The system includes 25 individual libraries including Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library (the central library).[3]Contents1 History 2 Governance 3 Books from Birth 4 Branches 5 Non-resident privileges 6 Nearby Public Library Systems 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit]Pre-1923 book plate for the DC Public Library.The library was founded in 1896 by an act of Congress after a lobbying effort by Theodore W. Noyes, editor of the Washington Evening Star newspaper. Noyes served on the library's board of trustees for 50 years.[4] The first library branch was located in a home at 1326 New York Avenue NW
[...More...]

"District Of Columbia Public Library" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Book
A book is a series of pages assembled for easy portability and reading, as well as the composition contained in it. The book's most common modern form is that of a codex volume consisting of rectangular paper pages bound on one side, with a heavier cover and spine, so that it can fan open for reading. Books have taken other forms, such as scrolls, leaves on a string, or strips tied together; and the pages have been of parchment, vellum, papyrus, bamboo slips, palm leaves, silk, wood, and other materials.[1] The contents of books are also called books, as are other compositions of that length. For instance, Aristotle's Physics, the constituent sections of the Bible, and even the Egyptian Book of the Dead
Book of the Dead
are called books independently of their physical form. Conversely, some long literary compositions are divided into books of varying sizes, which typically do not correspond to physically bound units
[...More...]

"Book" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

International Standard Name Identifier
The International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI) is an identifier for uniquely identifying the public identities of contributors to media content such as books, television programmes, and newspaper articles. Such an identifier consists of 16 digits. It can optionally be displayed as divided into four blocks. It was developed under the auspices of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as Draft International Standard 27729; the valid standard was published on 15 March 2012
[...More...]

"International Standard Name Identifier" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Public Library
A public library is a library that is accessible by the general public and is generally funded from public sources, such as taxes. It is operated by librarians and library paraprofessionals, who are also civil servants. There are five fundamental characteristics shared by public libraries. The first is that they are generally supported by taxes (usually local, though any level of government can and may contribute); they are governed by a board to serve the public interest; they are open to all, and every community member can access the collection; they are entirely voluntary in that no one is ever forced to use the services provided; and they provide basic services without charge.[1] Public libraries exist in many countries across the world and are often considered an essential part of having an educated and literate population
[...More...]

"Public Library" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

List Of Capitals In The United States
Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
is the current federal capital city of the United States, as it has been since 1800. Each U.S. state
U.S. state
has its own capital city, as do many of its insular areas. Historically, most states have not changed their capital city since becoming a state, but the capital cities of their respective preceding colonies, territories, kingdoms, and republics typically changed multiple times
[...More...]

"List Of Capitals In The United States" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Martin Luther King, Jr.
CampaignsMontgomery bus boycott Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom Youth March for Integrated Schools Albany Movement Birmingham campaign Walk to Freedom March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom St. Augustine movement Selma to Montgomery marches Chicago
Chicago
Open Housing Movement March Against Fear Memphis sanitation strike Poor People's CampaignDeath and memorialAssassination American federal holiday National memorial National Historical Parkv t eMartin Luther King
King
Jr. (January 15, 1929 – April 4, 1968) was an American Baptist minister and activist who became the most visible spokesperson and leader in the civil rights movement from 1954 until his death in 1968
[...More...]

"Martin Luther King, Jr." on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Culture Of Washington, D.C.
The culture of Washington, D.C. is influenced by the presence of the federal government, which has been instrumental in developing numerous cultural institutions throughout the city. During the early 20th century, Washington's U Street Corridor was an important center for African American culture.Contents1 Museums and monuments 2 Performing arts 3 Music 4 Television shows 5 Movies 6 Sports 7 Media7.1 Newspapers 7.2 Television 7.3 Radio8 The Latino Community in Washington, D.C. 9 ReferencesMuseums and monuments[edit]Jefferson Memorial at duskSmithsonian CastleNational Museum of the American IndianMt. St. Sepulchre Franciscan MonasteryWashington is home to numerous national landmarks and is one of the most popular tourist destinations in the United States. The National Mall is a large, open area in the center of the city featuring many monuments to American leaders; it also serves to connect the White House and the United States Capitol buildings
[...More...]

"Culture Of Washington, D.C." on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Theodore Roosevelt
United States Army New York Army National GuardYears of service 1882–1886, 1898Rank ColonelCommands held 1st United States Volunteer CavalryBattles/wars Spanish–American War  • Battle of Las Guasimas  • Battle of San Juan HillAwards Medal of Honor (Posthumously; 2001)This article is part of a series about Theodore RooseveltPolitical positions Electoral historyEarly life Family The Naval War of 1812Rough RidersBattle of San Juan HillGovernor of New YorkGovernorship "The Strenuous Life"Vice President of the United States1900 McKinley-Roosevelt campaign"Speak softly and carry a big stick"President of the United States PresidencyFirst termMcKinley assassination 1st inaugurationSquare Deal West Wing Coal strike Booker T. Washington
Booker T

[...More...]

"Theodore Roosevelt" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Library Of Congress
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
(LOC) is the research library that officially serves the United States
United States
Congress and is the de facto national library of the United States. It is the oldest federal cultural institution in the United States. The Library is housed in three buildings on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.; it also maintains the Packard Campus in Culpeper, Virginia, which houses the National Audio-Visual Conservation Center.[3] The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
claims to be the largest library in the world.[4][5] Its "collections are universal, not limited by subject, format, or national boundary, and include research materials from all parts of the world and in more than 450 languages
[...More...]

"Library Of Congress" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Andrew Carnegie
Andrew Carnegie
Andrew Carnegie
(/kɑːrˈneɪɡi/ kar-NAY-gee, but commonly /ˈkɑːrnəɡi/ KAR-nə-ghee or /kɑːrˈnɛɡi/ kar-NEG-ee;[3] November 25, 1835 – August 11, 1919) was a Scottish-American industrialist, business magnate, and philanthropist. Carnegie led the expansion of the American steel industry in the late 19th century and is often identified as one of the richest people (and richest Americans).[4] He became a leading philanthropist in the United States and in the British Empire. During the last 18 years of his life, he gave away about $350 million[5][note 1] to charities, foundations, and universities—almost 90 percent of his fortune. His 1889 article proclaiming "The Gospel of Wealth" called on the rich to use their wealth to improve society, and stimulated a wave of philanthropy. Carnegie was born in Dunfermline, Scotland, and emigrated to the United States with his parents in 1848
[...More...]

"Andrew Carnegie" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Carnegie Library Of Washington D.C.
The Carnegie Library of Washington D.C., also known as Central Public Library, is situated in Mount Vernon Square, Washington, D.C.. Donated to the public by entrepreneur Andrew Carnegie, it was dedicated on January 7, 1903. It was designed by the New York firm of Ackerman & Ross in the style of Beaux-Arts architecture. It was the first Carnegie library in Washington, D.C., and the first public library. It was also D.C.'s first desegregated public building. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places, as "Central Public Library", in 1969.[1][2] It was used as the central public library for Washington, D.C. for almost 70 years before it became overcrowded. The central library was then moved to Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library. After being shut down for ten years it was renovated as part of University of the District of Columbia. Currently it is used by the Historical Society of Washington, D.C
[...More...]

"Carnegie Library Of Washington D.C." on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

New York Avenue (Washington, D.C.)
New York Avenue is diagonal avenue radiating northeast from the White House in Washington, D.C., to the border with Maryland. It is a major east–west route in the city's Northwest and Northeast quadrants and connects downtown with points east and north of the city via Cheverly, Maryland, the John Hanson Highway, the Baltimore-Washington Parkway, and eventually Interstate 95.Contents1 History1.1 Major reconstructions2 Corridor redevelopment efforts 3 Route3.1 Places of interest4 References 5 BibliographyHistory[edit] New York Avenue was planned as one of the original streets in the L'Enfant Plan
L'Enfant Plan
for Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
It was intended to begin at the Potomac River
Potomac River
and extend northeast toward the White House, then continue past the Executive Residence
Executive Residence
northeast to the boundary of the Federal City
[...More...]

"New York Avenue (Washington, D.C.)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Washington Star
The Washington Star, previously known as the Washington Star-News and the Washington Evening Star, was a daily afternoon newspaper published in Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
between 1852 and 1981. For most of that time, it was the city's newspaper of record, and the longtime home to columnist Mary McGrory and cartoonist Clifford K. Berryman. On August 7, 1981, after 128 years, the Washington Star ceased publication and filed for bankruptcy. In the bankruptcy sale, The Washington Post
The Washington Post
purchased the land and buildings owned by the Star, including its printing presses.Contents1 History 2 Final years 3 Pulitzer Prizes 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The Washington Star
The Washington Star
was founded on December 16, 1852, by Captain Joseph Borrows Tate
[...More...]

"Washington Star" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Theodore W. Noyes
Theodore Williams Noyes (January 26, 1858 - July 4, 1946) was an American journalist. He was the editor-in-chief of Washington, DC's Evening Star newspaper for thirty-eight years.[1] He was the first son of Crosby Stuart Noyes and Elizabeth Selina Williams. After attending public schools in Washington, Theodore entered the preparatory program at Columbian College (which later became George Washington University) at age twelve. In 1877 at the age of nineteen he graduated with a Master of Arts degree and began his career as a reporter for the Star, of which his father Crosby Noyes had become part owner and editor in chief in 1867.[2] After four years, he returned to Columbian to attend law school, receiving his LL.B. in 1882 and his LL.M. in 1883.[1] Upon graduation, he was in poor health from rheumatic fever[3] and so did not return to the Star but accepted a job with the law firm Boyse, Noyes, and Boyse in the drier climate of Sioux Falls, Dakota Territory
[...More...]

"Theodore W. Noyes" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

United States Congress
535 voting members100 senators 435 representatives6 non-voting membersSenate political groups     Republican (51)      Democratic (47)      Independent (2) (caucusing with Democrats)House of Representatives political groups     Republican (238)      Democratic (193)      Vacant (4)ElectionsSenate last electionNovember 8, 2016House of Representatives last electionNovember 8, 2016Meeting place United States
[...More...]

"United States Congress" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Book Plate
A bookplate (or book-plate, as it was commonly styled until the early 20th C.[1]), also known as ex-librīs [Latin, "from the books of..."], is usually a small print or decorative label pasted into a book, often on the inside front cover, to indicate its owner
[...More...]

"Book Plate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.