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Disciples Of Christ
The Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)[note 1] is a mainline Protestant
Protestant
Christian denomination in the United States
United States
in the Reformed tradition with close ties to the Restoration Movement.[2] It is often referred to as The Christian Church, The Disciples of Christ, or as The Disciples. The Christian Church was a charter participant in the formation of the World Council of Churches
World Council of Churches
(WCC) and of the Federal Council of Churches (now the National Council of Churches), and it continues to be engaged in ecumenical conversations. The Disciples' local churches are congregationally governed
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Apostle (Christian)
In Christian theology
Christian theology
and ecclesiology, the apostles (Greek: ἀπόστολος, translit. apóstolos, lit. 'one who is sent away'), particularly the Twelve Apostles
Twelve Apostles
(also known as the Twelve Disciples or simply the Twelve), were the primary disciples of Jesus, the central figure in Christianity. During the life and ministry of Jesus
Jesus
in the 1st century AD, the apostles were his closest followers and became the primary teachers of the gospel message of Jesus. The word disciple is sometimes used interchangeably with apostle; for instance, the Gospel of John
Gospel of John
makes no distinction between the two terms[citation needed]. In modern usage, prominent missionaries are often called apostles, a practice which stems from the Latin
Latin
equivalent of apostle, i.e. missio, the source of the English word missionary
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin) (de facto) "Out of many, one" "Annuit cœptis" (Latin) "He h
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Evangelism
In Christianity, Evangelism
Evangelism
is the commitment to or act of publicly preaching of the Gospel
Gospel
with the intention of spreading the message and teachings of Jesus
Jesus
Christ. Christians who specialize in evangelism are often known as evangelists, whether they are in their home communities or living as missionaries in the field, although some Christian traditions refer to such people as missionaries in either case. Some Christian traditions consider evangelists to be in a leadership position; they may be found preaching to large meetings or in governance roles. Christian groups who encourage evangelism are sometimes known as evangelistic or evangelist
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American Civil War
Union victoryDissolution of the Confederate States U.S. territorial integrity preserved Slavery abolished Beginning of the Reconstruction EraBelligerents United States  Confederate StatesCommanders and leaders Abraham Lincoln Ulysses S. Grant William T. Sherman David Farragut George B. McClellan Henry Halleck George Meade and others Jefferson Davis Robert E. Lee  J. E. Johnston  G. T. Beauregard  A. S
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American Christian Missionary Society
A missionary is a member of a religious group sent into an area to proselytize and/or perform ministries of service, such as education, literacy, social justice, health care, and economic development.[1][2] The word "mission" originates from 1598 when the Jesuits sent members abroad, derived from the Latin missionem (nom. missio), meaning "act of sending" or mittere, meaning "to send".[3] The word was used in light of its biblical usage; in the Latin translation of the Bible, Christ uses the word when sending the disciples to preach The gospel in his name
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Philadelphia Confession
The 1689 Baptist Confession of Faith,[1][2] also called the Second London Baptist Confession, was written by Particular Baptists, who held to a Calvinistic Soteriology in England to give a formal expression of their Christian faith from a Baptist perspective. This confession, like the Westminster Confession of Faith (1646) and the Savoy Declaration (1658), was written by Puritans who were concerned that their particular church organisation reflect what they perceived to be Biblical teaching
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Jesus Christ
Jesus[e] (c. 4 BC – c. AD 30 / 33), also referred to as Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth
Nazareth
and Jesus
Jesus
Christ,[f] was a first-century Jewish preacher and religious leader.[12] He is the central figure of Christianity
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Westminster Confession Of Faith
The Westminster Confession of Faith
Westminster Confession of Faith
is a Reformed confession of faith. Drawn up by the 1646 Westminster Assembly
Westminster Assembly
as part of the Westminster Standards to be a confession of the Church of England, it became and remains the "subordinate standard" of doctrine in the Church of Scotland
Scotland
and has been influential within Presbyterian
Presbyterian
churches worldwide. In 1643, the English Parliament called upon "learned, godly and judicious Divines", to meet at Westminster Abbey
Westminster Abbey
in order to provide advice on issues of worship, doctrine, government and discipline of the Church of England. Their meetings, over a period of five years, produced the confession of faith, as well as a Larger Catechism and a Shorter Catechism
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Denominationalism
A religious denomination is a subgroup within a religion that operates under a common name, tradition, and identity.Major denominations and religions of the world.The term refers to the various Christian denominations (for example, Eastern Orthodox, Roman Catholic, and the many varieties of Protestantism)
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Ohio River
The Ohio
Ohio
River, which streams westward from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to Cairo, Illinois, is the largest tributary, by volume, of the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
in the United States. At the confluence, the Ohio
Ohio
is considerably bigger than the Mississippi
Mississippi
( Ohio
Ohio
at Cairo: 281,500 cu ft/s (7,960 m3/s);[2] Mississippi
Mississippi
at Thebes: 208,200 cu ft/s (5,897 m3/s)[3]) and, thus, is hydrologically the main stream of the whole river system. The 981-mile (1,579 km) river flows through or along the border of six states, and its drainage basin includes parts of 15 states. Through its largest tributary, the Tennessee River, the basin includes many of the states of the southeastern U.S
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Wikisource
Wikisource
Wikisource
is an online digital library of free content textual sources on a wiki, operated by the Wikimedia Foundation. Wikisource
Wikisource
is the name of the project as a whole and the name for each instance of that project (each instance usually representing a different language); multiple Wikisources make up the overall project of Wikisource. The project's aims are to host all forms of free text, in many languages, and translations. Originally conceived as an archive to store useful or important historical texts (its first text was the Déclaration universelle des Droits de l'Homme), it has expanded to become a general-content library. The project officially began in November 24, 2003 under the name Project Sourceberg, a play on the famous Project Gutenberg. The name Wikisource
Wikisource
was adopted later that year and it received its own domain name seven months later
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Reformed Tradition
Calvinism (also called the Reformed tradition, Reformed Christianity, Reformed Protestantism, or the Reformed faith) is a major branch of Protestantism that follows the theological tradition and forms of Christian practice of John Calvin and other Reformation-era theologians. Calvinists broke from the Roman Catholic Church in the 16th century. Calvinists differ from Lutherans on the real presence of Christ in the Eucharist, theories of worship, and the use of God's law for believers, among other things.[1][2] As declared in the Westminster and Second Helvetic confessions, the core doctrines are predestination and election. The term Calvinism can be misleading, because the religious tradition which it denotes has always been diverse, with a wide range of influences rather than a single founder
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Bourbon County, Kentucky
Bourbon County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of the 2010 census, the population was 19,985.[1] Its county seat is Paris.[2] Bourbon County is part of the Lexington–Fayette, KY Metropolitan Statistical Area. It is one of Kentucky's nine original counties, and is best known for its historical association with bourbon whiskey.Contents1 History1.1 Old Bourbon 1.2 Birthplace of Bourbon whiskey 1.3 Courthouse2 Geography2.1 Adjacent counties3 Demographics 4 Politics 5 Communities 6 Notable people 7 See also 8 ReferencesHistory[edit] Old Bourbon[edit] Bourbon County was established in 1785 from a portion of Fayette County, Virginia,[3][4] and named after the French House of Bourbon,[5] in gratitude for Louis XVI of France's assistance during the American Revolutionary War. Bourbon County, Virginia, originally comprised 34 of Kentucky's 120 current ones, including the current Bourbon County.[6][7][8] This larger area later became known as Old Bourbon
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National Council Of Churches
The National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA, usually identified as the National Council of Churches
National Council of Churches
(NCC), is the largest ecumenical body in the United States.[1] NCC is an ecumenical partnership of 38 Christian
Christian
faith groups in the United States
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Christian Churches Together
Christian Churches Together in the USA (CCT) is an organization formed in 2007 to "broaden and expand fellowship, unity and witness among the diverse expressions of Christian traditions in the USA."[1] Christian Churches Together states that its purpose is to create as a place where people of widely differing Christian backgrounds can come together for dialog and sharing, to seek common ground rather than debate differences. It does not attempt to combine Christian faiths or compromise their distinctiveness. Rather, CCT was created as a space for dialogue and cooperation among churches and a variety of ecumenical Christian ministry organizations
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