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Dionysiaca
The Dionysiaca[pronunciation?] (Greek: Διονυσιακά, Dionysiaká) is an ancient Greek epic poem and the principal work of Nonnus. It is an epic in 48 books, the longest surviving poem from antiquity at 20,426 lines, composed in Homeric dialect and dactylic hexameters, the main subject of which is the life of Dionysus, his expedition to India, and his triumphant return to the west.Contents1 Composition 2 Poetic models 3 Influence 4 Metrics and style 5 Critical responses to the Dionysiaca 6 Contents 7 Footnotes 8 External linksComposition[edit] The poem is thought to have been written in the late 4th and/or early 5th century AD
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Greek Language
Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά [eliniˈka], elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα [eliniˈci ˈɣlosa] ( listen), ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece
Greece
and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean
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Caesura
A caesura (/siːˈʒjʊərə/ or /sɪˈʒʊrə/, pl. caesuras or caesurae; Latin
Latin
for "cutting"), also written cæsura and cesura, is a break in a verse where one phrase ends and the following phrase begins. It may be a comma, a tick, or two slashed lines //. In time value this break may vary between the slightest perception of silence all the way up to a full pause. Considered a breath, a caesura in music represents a similar break or pause.[1] The length of a caesura where notated is at the discretion of the conductor
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Dracontius
Blossius Aemilius Dracontius (c. 455 – c. 505) of Carthage was a Christian poet who flourished in the latter part of the 5th century. He belonged to a family of land proprietors, and practiced as an advocate in his native place. After the conquest of the country by the Vandals, Dracontius was at first allowed to retain possession of his estates, but was subsequently deprived of his property and thrown into prison by the Vandal king, whose triumphs he had omitted to celebrate, while he had written a panegyric on a foreign and hostile ruler. He subsequently addressed an elegiac poem to the king, asking pardon, and pleading for release. The result is not known, but it is supposed that Dracontius obtained his liberty and migrated to northern Italy in search of peace and quietness
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Ancient Greek
The Ancient Greek language
Greek language
includes the forms of Greek used in ancient Greece
Greece
and the ancient world from around the 9th century BC to the 6th century AD. It is often roughly divided into the Archaic period (9th to 6th centuries BC), Classical period (5th and 4th centuries BC), and Hellenistic period
Hellenistic period
(Koine Greek, 3rd century BC to the 4th century AD). It is antedated in the second millennium BC by Mycenaean Greek and succeeded by medieval Greek. Koine is regarded as a separate historical stage of its own, although in its earliest form it closely resembled Attic Greek
Attic Greek
and in its latest form it approaches Medieval Greek
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Joseph Genesius
Genesius (Greek: Γενέσιος, Genesios) is the conventional name given to the anonymous Byzantine author of Armenian origin of the tenth century chronicle, On the reign of the emperors. His first name is sometimes given as Joseph, combining him with a "Joseph Genesius" quoted in the preamble to John Skylitzes. Traditionally, he has been regarded as the son or grandson of Constantine Maniakes. Composed at the court of Constantine VII, the chronicle opens in 814, covers the Second Iconoclast period and ends in 886. It presents the events largely from the view of the Macedonian dynasty, though with a skew less marked than the authors of Theophanes Continuatus, a collection of mostly anonymous chronicles meant to continue the work of Theophanes the Confessor. The chronicle describes the reigns of the four emperors from Leo V down to Michael III in detail; and more briefly that of Basil I
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Planudes
Maximus Planudes (Greek: Μάξιμος Πλανούδης, Máximos Planoúdēs; c. 1260 – c. 1305)[1] was a Byzantine Greek monk, scholar, anthologist, translator, grammarian and theologian at Constantinople. Through his translations from Latin into Greek and from Greek into Latin he brought the Greek East and the Latin West into closer contact with one another. He is now best known as a compiler of the Greek Anthology.[2]Contents1 Biography 2 Notes 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Maximus Planudes lived during the reigns of the Byzantine emperors Michael VIII and Andronikos II. He was born at Nicomedia in Bithynia in 1260, but the greater part of his life was spent in Constantinople, where as a monk he devoted himself to study and teaching
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Poliziano
Angelo Ambrogini (14 July 1454 – 24 September 1494), commonly known by his nickname Poliziano
Poliziano
(Italian: [politˈtsjaːno]; anglicized as Politian; Latin: Politianus),[1] was an Italian classical scholar and poet of the Florentine Renaissance. His scholarship was instrumental in the divergence of Renaissance (or Humanist) Latin
Latin
from medieval norms[2][3] and for developments in philology.[4] His nickname, Poliziano, by which he is chiefly identified to the present day, was derived from the Latin
Latin
name of his birthplace, Montepulciano
Montepulciano
(Mons Politianus). Poliziano's works include translations of passages from Homer's Iliad, an edition of the poetry of Catullus
Catullus
and commentaries on classical authors and literature
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Goethe
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
(/ˈɡɜːrtə/;[1][2][3] German: [ˈjoːhan ˈvɔlfɡaŋ fɔn ˈɡøːtə] ( listen); 28 August 1749 – 22 March 1832) was a German writer and statesman. His works include four novels; epic and lyric poetry; prose and verse dramas; memoirs; an autobiography; literary and aesthetic criticism; and treatises on botany, anatomy, and colour. In addition, there are numerous literary and scientific fragments, more than 10,000 letters, and nearly 3,000 drawings by him extant. A literary celebrity by the age of 25, Goethe was ennobled by the Duke of Saxe-Weimar, Carl August in 1782 after taking up residence there in November 1775 following the success of his first novel, The Sorrows of Young Werther
Werther
(1774). He was an early participant in the Sturm und Drang literary movement
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Harmonia (mythology)
Harmonia (/hɑːrˈmoʊniə/; Ancient Greek: Ἁρμονία), in Greek mythology, is the immortal goddess of harmony and concord. Her Roman counterpart is Concordia, and her Greek opposite is Eris, whose Roman counterpart is Discordia. There was also a nymph called Harmonia
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Quantitative Meter
In poetry, metre is the basic rhythmic structure of a verse or lines in verse. Many traditional verse forms prescribe a specific verse metre, or a certain set of metres alternating in a particular order. The study and the actual use of metres and forms of versification are both known as prosody
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Colluthus
According to the Suda, Coluthus (Greek: Κόλουθος), often Colluthus, of Lycopolis in the Egyptian Thebaid, was an epic poet writing in Greek, who flourished during the reign of Anastasius I (491-518).[1]Contents1 Calydoniaca and The Rape of Helen 2 Printed editions 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksCalydoniaca and The Rape of Helen[edit] The Suda (K 1951) adds that he was the author of a Calydoniaca in six books, doubtless an account of the Calydonian boar hunt, Persica, probably an encomium on emperor Anastasius composed at the end of the Persian wars, and Encomia, or laudatory poems. The Suda does not mention "The Abduction of Helen". All works mentioned in the Suda are lost, but his poem in 392 hexameters on The Abduction of Helen (Ἁρπαγὴ Ἑλένης) is still extant, having been discovered by Cardinal Bessarion in Calabria
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Metamorphoses
The Metamorphoses
Metamorphoses
(Latin: Metamorphōseōn librī: "Books of Transformations") is a Latin
Latin
narrative poem by the Roman poet Ovid, considered his magnum opus. Comprising fifteen books and over 250 myths, the poem chronicles the history of the world from its creation to the deification of Julius Caesar
Julius Caesar
within a loose mythico-historical framework. Although meeting the criteria for an epic, the poem defies simple genre classification by its use of varying themes and tones
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Epyllion
In classical studies the term epyllion (Ancient Greek: ἐπύλλιον, plural: ἐπύλλια, epyllia) refers to a comparatively short narrative poem (or discrete episode within a longer work) that shows formal affinities with epic, but betrays a preoccupation with themes and poetic techniques that are not generally or, at least, primarily characteristic of epic proper.Contents1 Etymology and modern usage 2 Characteristics2.1 Subject matter and tone 2.2 Poetic techniques3 List of epyllia3.1 Hellenistic 3.2 Latin 3.3 Late antiquity4 Notes 5 BibliographyEtymology and modern usage[edit] Ancient Greek ἐπύλλιον (epyllion) is the diminutive of ἔπος (epos) in that word's senses of "verse" or "epic poem"; Liddell and Scott's Greek–English Lexicon thus defines ἐπύλλιον as a "versicle, scrap of poetry" or "short epic poem", citing for the latter definition Athenaeus, Deipnosophistae 2.68 (65a–b):[1]ὅτι τ
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Byzantine
The Byzantine
Byzantine
Empire, also referred to as the Eastern Roman Empire, was the continuation of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the East during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, when its capital city was Constantinople
Constantinople
(modern-day Istanbul, which had been founded as Byzantium). It survived the fragmentation and fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the 5th century AD and continued to exist for an additional thousand years until it fell to the Ottoman Turks in 1453.[2] During most of its existence, the empire was the most powerful economic, cultural, and military force in Europe
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Emathion
In Greek mythology, the name Emathion (Ancient Greek: Ἠμαθίων) refers to four individuals.Emathion, king of Aethiopia, the son of Tithonus
Tithonus
and Eos, and brother of Memnon. Heracles
Heracles
killed him. Emathion, king of Samothrace, was the son of Zeus
Zeus
and Electra (one of the Pleiades), brother to Dardanus, Iasion, Eetion, and (rarely) Harmonia. He sent soldiers to join Dionysus
Dionysus
in his Indian campaigns.[1] Emathion, a Trojan prince, and the father of Atymnius and Diomedes, by the naiad Pegasis, daughter of the river god Granicus.[2] Emathion, was aged Aethiopian courtier of Cepheus in Ethiopia. He "feared the gods and stood for upright deeds". Emathion was killed by Chromis during the fight between Phineus and Perseus.[3] Emathion, one of the companions of Aeneas
Aeneas
in Italy
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