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Diomedes
DIOMEDES (/ˌdaɪəˈmiːdiːz/ or /ˌdaɪˈɒmɪdiːz/ ) or DIOMEDE (/ˈdaɪəmiːd/ ; Greek : Διομήδης Diomēdēs "God-like cunning, advised by Zeus") is a hero in Greek mythology
Greek mythology
, known for his participation in the Trojan War
Trojan War
. He was born to Tydeus and Deipyle and later became King of Argos
Argos
, succeeding his maternal grandfather, Adrastus . In Homer
Homer
's Iliad Diomedes
Diomedes
is regarded alongside Ajax as one of the best warriors of all the Achaeans (behind only Achilles
Achilles
in prowess). Later, he founded ten or more Italian cities. After his death, Diomedes
Diomedes
was worshipped as a divine being under various names in Italy
Italy
and also in Greece
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Iphigenia
In Greek mythology , IPHIGENIA (/ɪfɪdʒɪˈnaɪ.ə/ ; Ancient Greek : Ἰφιγένεια, Iphigeneia) was a daughter of King Agamemnon and Queen Clytemnestra , and thus a princess of Argos . Agamemnon offends the goddess Artemis , who retaliates by commanding him to kill Iphigenia as a sacrifice so his ships can sail to Troy . In some versions, Iphigenia is sacrificed at Aulis , but in others, Artemis rescues her. In the version where she is saved, she goes to the Taurians and meets her brother Orestes
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Aetolian
AETOLIA (Greek : Αἰτωλία) is a mountainous region of Greece on the north coast of the Gulf of Corinth
Gulf of Corinth
, forming the eastern part of the modern regional unit of Aetolia-Acarnania
Aetolia-Acarnania
. CONTENTS * 1 Geography * 2 History * 2.1 Ancient era * 2.2 Middle Ages * 3 List of Aetolians * 4 See also * 5 References GEOGRAPHYThe Achelous River
Achelous River
separates Aetolia
Aetolia
from Acarnania
Acarnania
to the west; on the north it had boundaries with Epirus
Epirus
and Thessaly
Thessaly
; on the east with the Ozolian Locrians
Locrians
; and on the south the entrance to the Corinthian Gulf
Corinthian Gulf
defined the limits of Aetolia
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Hubris
HUBRIS (/ˈhjuːbrɪs/ , also HYBRIS, from ancient Greek ὕβρις) describes a personality quality of extreme or foolish pride or dangerous overconfidence . In its ancient Greek context, it typically describes behavior that defies the norms of behavior or challenges the gods, and which in turn brings about the downfall, or nemesis , of the perpetrator of hubris. The adjectival form of the noun hubris is "hubristic". Hubris
Hubris
is usually perceived as a characteristic of an individual rather than a group, although the group the offender belongs to may unintentionally suffer consequences from the wrongful act. Hubris
Hubris
often indicates a loss of contact with reality and an overestimation of one's own competence, accomplishments or capabilities
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Calydon
CALYDON (/ˈkælᵻdɒn/ ; Greek : Καλυδών; gen.: Καλυδῶνος) was an ancient Greek city in Aetolia
Aetolia
, situated on the west bank of the river Evenus , 7.5 Roman miles (approx. 11 km) from the sea. Its name is most famous today for the Calydonian Boar that had to be overcome by heroes of the Olympian age. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Archaeology * 3 Finds * 4 See also * 5 References HISTORYAccording to Greek mythology
Greek mythology
, the city took its name from its founder Calydon
Calydon
, son of Aetolus . Close to the city stood Mount Arakynthos (Zygos), the slopes of which provided the setting for the hunt of the Calydonian Boar. The city housed the important Aetolian sanctuary known as the Laphrion, dedicated to Artemis
Artemis
Laphria and Apollo
Apollo
Laphrios
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Shield
A SHIELD is a piece of personal armour held in the hand or mounted on the wrist or forearm. Shields are used to intercept specific attacks, whether from close-ranged weaponry or projectiles such as arrows , by means of active blocks, instead of providing passive protection. Shields vary greatly in size, ranging from large panels that protect the user's whole body to small models (such as the buckler ) that were intended for hand-to-hand-combat use. Shields also vary a great deal in thickness; whereas some shields were made of relatively deep, absorbent, wooden planking to protect soldiers from the impact of spears and crossbow bolts, others were thinner and lighter and designed mainly for deflecting blade strikes
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Tiresias
In Greek mythology
Greek mythology
, TIRESIAS (/taɪˈriːsiəs/ ; Greek : Τειρεσίας, Teiresias) was a blind prophet of Apollo
Apollo
in Thebes , famous for clairvoyance and for being transformed into a woman for seven years. He was the son of the shepherd Everes and the nymph Chariclo . Tiresias
Tiresias
participated fully in seven generations in Thebes, beginning as advisor to Cadmus
Cadmus
himself
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Cuirass
A CUIRASS (/kwᵻˈræs/ ; French : cuirasse, Latin : coriaceus) is a piece of armour , formed of a single or multiple pieces of metal or other rigid material which covers the front of the torso. In a suit of armour, the cuirass was generally connected to a back piece. Cuirass
Cuirass
could also refer to the complete torso-protecting armour
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Seven Against Thebes
SEVEN AGAINST THEBES ( Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
: Ἑπτὰ ἐπὶ Θήβας, Hepta epi Thēbas; Latin : Septem contra Thebas) is the third play in an Oedipus-themed trilogy produced by Aeschylus in 467 BC. The trilogy is sometimes referred to as the OEDIPODEA. It concerns the battle between an Argive army led by Polynices and the army of Thebes led by Eteocles and his supporters. The trilogy won the first prize at the City Dionysia . The trilogy's first two plays, Laius and Oedipus, as well as the satyr play Sphinx, are no longer extant
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Epic Poetry
An EPIC POEM, EPIC, EPOS, or EPOPEE is a lengthy narrative poem , ordinarily concerning a serious subject containing details of heroic deeds and events significant to a culture or nation. Milman Parry and Albert Lord have argued that the Homeric epics, the earliest works of Western literature, were fundamentally an oral poetic form. These works form the basis of the epic genre in Western literature. Nearly all of Western epic (including Virgil's Aeneid
Aeneid
and Dante's Divine Comedy
Comedy
) self-consciously presents itself as a continuation of the tradition begun by these poems. Classical epic poetry employs a meter called dactylic hexameter and recounts a journey, either physical (as typified by Odysseus in the Odyssey
Odyssey
) or mental (as typified by Achilles in the Iliad
Iliad
) or both
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Sortition
In governance , SORTITION (also known as ALLOTMENT or DEMARCHY) selects political officials as a random sample from a larger pool of candidates. The logic behind the sortition process originates from the idea that “power corrupts.” For that reason, when the time came to choose individuals to be assigned to empowering positions, the ancient Athenians resorted to choosing by lot. In ancient Athenian democracy , SORTITION was therefore the traditional and primary method for appointing political officials, and its use was regarded as a principal characteristic of true democracy . Today, sortition is commonly used to select prospective jurors in common law -based legal systems and is sometimes used in forming citizen groups with political advisory power (citizens\' juries or citizens\' assemblies )
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Hero
A HERO (masculine) or HEROINE (feminine) is a person or main character of a literary work who, in the face of danger, combats adversity through impressive feats of ingenuity , bravery or strength , often sacrificing their own personal concerns for a greater good . The concept of the hero was first founded in classical literature . It is the main or revered character in heroic epic poetry celebrated through ancient legends of a people; often striving for military conquest and living by a continually flawed personal honor code. The definition of a hero has changed throughout time, and the Merriam Webster dictionary defines a hero as "a person who is admired for great or brave acts or fine qualities"
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Greek Language
GREEK ( Modern Greek : ελληνικά , elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα ( listen ), ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece
Greece
and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean . It has the longest documented history of any living Indo-European language, spanning 34 centuries of written records. Its writing system has been the Greek alphabet for the major part of its history; other systems, such as Linear B and the Cypriot syllabary , were used previously. The alphabet arose from the Phoenician script and was in turn the basis of the Latin
Latin
, Cyrillic
Cyrillic
, Armenian , Coptic , Gothic and many other writing systems
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Cyanippus
In Greek mythology
Greek mythology
, the name CYANIPPUS (Greek : Κυάνιππος) may refer to: * CYANIPPUS, son of Aegialeus and Comaetho , or else son of Adrastus and Amphithea and brother of Aegialeus. He fought in the Trojan War and was one of the men who entered the Trojan Horse
Trojan Horse
. For a while, he ruled over Argos
Argos
. He died childless and was succeeded by Cylarabes , son of Sthenelus . * CYANIPPUS, son of Pharax, from Thessaly
Thessaly
. He fell in love with the beautiful Leucone and married her, but he was so fond of hunting that he would not spend any time with his young wife
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Magna Graeca
Timeline Italy portal * v * t * e MAGNA GRAECIA (/ˌmæɡnə ˈɡriːsiə, ˈɡriːʃə/ , US : /ˌmæɡnə ˈɡreɪʃə/ ; Latin meaning "Great Greece", Greek : Μεγάλη Ἑλλάς, Megálē Hellás) was the name given by the Romans to the coastal areas of Southern Italy in the present-day regions of Campania , Apulia , Basilicata , Calabria and Sicily that were extensively populated by Greek settlers; particularly the Achaean settlements of Croton , and Sybaris , and to the north, the settlements of Cumae and Neapolis . The settlers who began arriving in the 8th century BC brought with them their Hellenic civilization , which was to leave a lasting imprint in Italy, such as in the culture of ancient Rome . Most notably the Roman poet Ovid referred to the south of Italy as Magna Graecia in his poem Fasti
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Neoptolemus
NEOPTOLEMUS (/ˌniːəpˈtɒlᵻməs/ ; Greek : Νεοπτόλεμος, Neoptolemos, "new warrior"), also called PYRRHUS (/ˈpɪrəs/ ; Πύρρος, Pyrrhos, "red", for his red hair), was the son of the warrior Achilles
Achilles
and the princess Deidamia in Greek mythology
Greek mythology
, and also the mythical progenitor of the ruling dynasty of the Molossians
Molossians
of ancient Epirus
Epirus
. In Cypria , Achilles
Achilles
sails to Scyros
Scyros
after a failed expedition to Troy
Troy
, marries princess Deidamia and has Neoptolemus, until Achilles is called to arms again. In a non-Homeric version of the story, Achilles' mother Thetis
Thetis
foretold many years before Achilles' birth that there would be a great war. She saw that her only son was to die if he fought in the war
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