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Dinar Aghlabide
The dinar is a main currency unit in modern circulation in seven mostly- Islamic
Islamic
and two mostly-Orthodox ( Serbia
Serbia
and Macedonia) countries, and has historic use in several more.Contents1 History 2 Legal tender2.1 Countries currently usi
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Dinar (other)
Dinar
Dinar
may refer to:Dinar, currency, name of the following:v t eCurrencies named dinar or similarCirculating Algerian dinar
Algerian dinar
(دينار)
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Offa Of Mercia
Offa was King of Mercia, a kingdom of Anglo-Saxon England, from 757 until his death in July 796. The son of Thingfrith
Thingfrith
and a descendant of Eowa, Offa came to the throne after a period of civil war following the assassination of Æthelbald. Offa defeated the other claimant, Beornred. In the early years of Offa's reign, it is likely that he consolidated his control of Midland peoples such as the Hwicce
Hwicce
and the Magonsæte. Taking advantage of instability in the kingdom of Kent
Kent
to establish himself as overlord, Offa also controlled Sussex by 771, though his authority did not remain unchallenged in either territory. In the 780s he extended Mercian supremacy over most of southern England, allying with Beorhtric
Beorhtric
of Wessex, who married Offa's daughter Eadburh, and regained complete control of the southeast
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Jordanian Dinar
The Jordanian dinar
Jordanian dinar
(Arabic: دينار‎; code: JOD; unofficially abbreviated as JD) has been the currency of Jordan
Jordan
since 1950. The Jordanian dinar
Jordanian dinar
is also widely used alongside the Israeli shekel in the West Bank. The dinar is divided into 10 dirham, 100 qirsh (also called piastres) or 1000 fulus.Contents1 History 2 Coins 3 Banknotes 4 Fixed exchange rate 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] For a wider history surrounding currency in the region, see British currency in the Middle East. From 1927 to 1950, the Palestine Currency
Currency
Board issued the Palestine pound as the official currency in both Mandatory Palestine
Mandatory Palestine
and the Emirate of Transjordan
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Kuwait
Coordinates: 29°30′N 45°45′E / 29.500°N 45.750°E / 29.500; 45.750State of Kuwait دولة الكويت (Arabic) Dawlat al-KuwaitFlagEmblemAnthem: "Al-Nasheed Al-Watani" "National Anthem"Location of  Kuwait  (green)Capital and largest city Kuwait
Kuwait
City 29°22′N 47°58′E / 29.367°N 47.967°E / 29.367; 47.967Official languages ArabicEthnic groups60%
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Kuwaiti Dinar
The Kuwaiti dinar
Kuwaiti dinar
(Arabic: دينار‎, code: KWD) is the currency of Kuwait. It is sub-divided into 1,000 fils. The Kuwaiti dinar
Kuwaiti dinar
is the world's highest-valued currency unit.[2]Contents1 History 2 Coins 3 Banknotes3.1 First series 3.2 Second series 3.3 Third series 3.4 Fourth series 3.5 Fifth series 3.6 Sixth series 3.7 Commemorative issues4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] See also: British currency in the Middle East The dinar was introduced in 1960 to replace the Gulf rupee, equal to the Indian rupee
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Libya
Libya
Libya
(/ˈlɪbiə/ ( listen); Arabic: ليبيا‎),[6][7] officially the State of Libya
Libya
(Arabic: دولة ليبيا‎ Dawlat Lībyā),[citation needed][dubious – discuss] is a sovereign state in the Maghreb
Maghreb
region of North Africa, bordered by the Mediterranean Sea to the north, Egypt
Egypt
to the east, Sudan
Sudan
to the southeast, Chad
Chad
and Niger
Niger
to the south, and Algeria
Algeria
and Tunisia
Tunisia
to the west. The country is made of three historical regions, Tripolitania, Fezzan, and Cyrenaica
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Libyan Dinar
The dinar (Arabic: دينار‎ dīnār) is the currency of Libya. Its ISO 4217
ISO 4217
code is "LYD". The dinar is subdivided into 1000 dirham (درهم). It was introduced in September 1971 and replaced the pound at par.[1] It is issued by the Central Bank of Libya, which also supervises the banking system and regulates credit. In 1972, the Libyan Arab Foreign Bank was established to deal with overseas investment. Ali Mohammed Salem, deputy governor of Central Bank of Libya
Libya
stated the exchange rate of Libyan dinar would be pegged to special drawing rights for one to three years, according to an interview to Reuters on 27 December 2011.[2]Contents1 Coins 2 Banknotes2.1 Current series3 Popular nomenclature and denominations 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksCoins[edit] Until 1975, old coins denominated in milliemes (equal to the dirham) circulated
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Macedonian Denar
The denar (Macedonian: денар; paucal: denari / денари) is the currency of Republic of Macedonia.Contents1 History1.1 Etymology2 First denar (1992–1993)2.1 History 2.2 Coins 2.3 Banknotes2.3.1 Production 2.3.2 Design2.4 Exchange rates3 Second denar (1993–present)3.1 Coins3.1.1 FAO
FAO
coinage (1995)3.2 Banknotes 3.3 Exchange rates4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The first Macedonian denar
Macedonian denar
was established on 26 April 1992.[1] It replaced the 1990 version of the Yugoslav dinar
Yugoslav dinar
at par. In May 1993, the currency was reformed. A new denar was introduced, with one new denar being equal to 100 old denari. Etymology[edit] The name denar comes from the name of the ancient Roman monetary unit, the denarius
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Serbian Dinar
The dinar (Serbian Cyrillic: динар, pronounced [dînaːr]; paucal: dinara / динара) is the currency of Serbia. The earliest use of the dinar dates back to 1214.Contents1 Medieval dinar 2 First modern dinar (1868–1920)2.1 Coins 2.2 Banknotes3 Second modern dinar (1941–1944)3.1 Coins 3.2 Banknotes4 Third modern dinar (2003–present)4.1 Coins 4.2 Banknotes 4.3 Exchange rates5 See also 6 References 7 External linksMedieval dinar[edit] Main article: Coinage of Serbia
Serbia
in the Middle Ages Dinar
Dinar
of King Stefan Dragutin.The first mention of a "Serbian dinar" dates back to the reign of Stefan Nemanjić
Stefan Nemanjić
in 1214. Until the fall of Despot Stjepan Tomašević in 1459, most of the Serbian rulers minted silver dinar coins
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Tunisia
Islam
Islam
(state religion; 99.1% Sunni[9] others (1%; including Christian, Jewish, Shia, Bahá'í)[9]Demonym TunisianGovernment Unitary semi-presidential republic[12][13]• PresidentBeji Caid Essebsi• Head of GovernmentYoussef ChahedLegislature Assembly of the Representatives of the PeopleFormation•  Husainid Dynasty
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Tunisian Dinar
The dinar (Arabic: دينار‎, ISO 4217
ISO 4217
currency code: TND) is the currency of Tunisia. It is subdivided into 1000 milim or millimes (ملّيم)
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Mancus
Mancus
Mancus
(sometimes spelt mancosus or similar) was a term used in early medieval Europe to denote either a gold coin, a weight of gold of 4.25g (equivalent to the Islamic dinar,[1] and thus lighter than the Byzantine solidus), or a unit of account of thirty silver pence. This made it worth about a month's wages for a skilled worker, such as a craftsman or a soldier.[2] Distinguishing between these uses can be extremely difficult: the will of the Anglo-Saxon king Eadred, who died in 955, illustrates the problem well with its request that "two thousand mancuses of gold be taken and minted into mancuses" (nime man twentig hund mancusa goldes and gemynetige to mancusan).[3]Contents1 Origin and development 2 See also 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksOrigin and development[edit] The origin of the word mancus has long been a cause of debate
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Abbasid Caliphate
The Abbasid Caliphate
Caliphate
(/əˈbæsɪd/ or /ˈæbəsɪd/ Arabic: ٱلْخِلافَةُ ٱلْعَبَّاسِيَّة‎ al-Khilāfatu al-‘Abbāsīyah) was the third of the Islamic caliphates to succeed the Islamic prophet Muhammad. The Abbasid dynasty
Abbasid dynasty
descended from Muhammad's uncle, Al-Abbas ibn Abd al-Muttalib
Al-Abbas ibn Abd al-Muttalib
(566–653 CE), from whom the dynasty takes its name.[2] They ruled as caliphs for most of their period from their capital in Baghdad
Baghdad
in modern-day Iraq, after assuming authority over the Muslim empire from the Umayyads in 750 CE (132 AH). The Abbasid caliphate first centred its government in Kufa, but in 762 the caliph Al-Mansur
Al-Mansur
founded the city of Baghdad, near the Sasanian capital city of Ctesiphon
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Iraqi Dinar
The Dinar
Dinar
( Arabic
Arabic
pronunciation: [diːˈnɑːr]) (Arabic: دينار, [(sign: د.ع; code: IQD) is the currency of Iraq. It is issued by the Central Bank of Iraq
Iraq
and is subdivided into 1,000 fils (فلس), although inflation has rendered the fils obsolete since 1990.Contents1 History 2 Speculation 3 Coins 4 Banknotes4.1 Kingdom Dinar
Dinar
Series (1932–1958) 4.2 Swiss Dinar
Dinar
Series (1979–1986) 4.3 1990–2003 Series 4.4 2003–present5 Exchange rate 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] The dinar was introduced into circulation in 1932, by replacing the Indian rupee, which had been the official currency since the British occupation of the country in World War I, at a rate of 1 dinar = 11 rupees
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British Museum
5,906,716 (2017)[2]Ranked 1st nationallyChairman Sir Richard LambertDirector Hartwig FischerPublic transit access Goodge Street; Holborn; Tottenham Court Road; Russell Square;Website britishmuseum.orgArea 807,000 sq ft (75,000 m2) in 94 GalleriesThe centre of the museum was redeveloped in 2001 to become the Great Court, surrounding the original Reading Room.The British Museum, located in the Bloomsbury
Bloomsbury
area of London, United Kingdom, is a public institution dedicated to human history, art and culture
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