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Dilophosaurus
Dilophosaurus
Dilophosaurus
(/daɪˌloʊfəˈsɔːrəs, -foʊ-/[1] dy-LOHF-o-SOR-əs) is a genus of theropod dinosaur that lived in what is now North America during the Early Jurassic
Early Jurassic
Period, about 193 million years ago. In 1940 three skeletons were found in northern Arizona. The two best preserved of these were collected in 1942, with the most complete later made the holotype specimen of a new species of the genus Megalosaurus, named M. wetherilli by Samuel P. Welles in 1954. Welles found a larger skeleton belonging to the same species in 1964. Realizing it bore crests on its skull, he moved the species to the new genus Dilophosaurus
Dilophosaurus
in 1970, as D. wetherilli. The genus name means "two-crested lizard", and the species name honors John Wetherill, a Navajo
Navajo
councilor
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Connecticut
Coordinates: 41°36′N 72°42′W / 41.6°N 72.7°W / 41.6; -72.7State of ConnecticutFlag SealNickname(s):The Constitution State (official) The Nutmeg
Nutmeg
State The Provisions State The Land of Steady HabitsMotto(s): Qui transtulit sustinet
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Animal
Animals are multicellular eukaryotic organisms that form the biological kingdom Animalia. With few exceptions, animals consume organic material, breathe oxygen, are able to move, reproduce sexually, and grow from a hollow sphere of cells, the blastula, during embryonic development. Over 1.5 million living animal species have been described—of which around 1 million are insects—but it has been estimated there are over 7 million in total. Animals range in size from 8.5 millionths of a metre to 33.6 metres (110 ft) long and have complex interactions with each other and their environments, forming intricate food webs. The study of animals is called zoology. Aristotle divided animals into those with blood and those without. Carl Linnaeus
Carl Linnaeus
created the first hierarchical biological classification for animals in 1758 with his Systema Naturae, which Jean-Baptiste Lamarck expanded into 14 phyla by 1809
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Sexual Selection
Sexual selection
Sexual selection
is a mode of natural selection where members of one biological sex choose mates of the other sex to mate with (intersexual selection), and compete with members of the same sex for access to members of the opposite sex (intrasexual selection). These two forms of selection mean that some individuals have better reproductive success than others within a population, either from being more attractive or preferring more attractive partners to produce offspring.[1][2] For instance in the breeding season sexual selection in frogs occurs with the males first gathering at the water's edge and making their mating calls: croaking. The females then arrive and choose the males with the deepest croaks and best territories. Generalizing, males benefit from frequent mating and monopolizing access to a group of fertile females
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Species Recognition
Intra-species recognition is the recognition by a member of a species of a conspecific (another member of the same species). In many species, such recognition is necessary for procreation. Different species may employ different methods, but all of them are based on one or more senses (after all, this is how the organism gathers information about the environment). The recognition may happen by chemical signature (smell), by having a distinctive shape or color (sight), by emitting certain sounds (hearing), or even by behaviour patterns. Often a combination of these is used. Among human beings, the sense of sight is usually in charge of recognizing other members of the same species, with maybe the subconscious help of smell. In particular, the human brain has a disproportionate amount of processing power dedicated to finely analyze the features of a human face
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Visual Display
Display is a form of animal behaviour, linked to sexual selection and survival of the species in various ways. One example of display used by some species can be found in the form of courtship, with the male usually having a striking feature that is distinguished by colour, shape or size, used to attract a female. In other instances, species may exhibit territorial display behaviour, in order to preserve a foraging or hunting territory for its family or group. A third form is exhibited by tournament species in which males will fight in order to gain the 'right' to breed.Contents1 Among animals 2 Among humans 3 Tournament species 4 See also 5 ReferencesAmong animals[edit] Animals use display behaviors and markings as signals to other animals, usually of the same species. Although there is a great variety in the manner of display in animals, they are usually meant as honest advertisements of the health, vigor, and/or toxicity of the possessor
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Vestigial
Vestigiality
Vestigiality
is the retention during the process of evolution of genetically determined structures or attributes that have lost some or all of their ancestral function in a given species.[1] Assessment of the vestigiality must generally rely on comparison with homologous features in related species. The emergence of vestigiality occurs by normal evolutionary processes, typically by loss of function of a feature that is no longer subject to positive selection pressures when it loses its value in a changing environment. The feature may be selected against more urgently when its function becomes definitively harmful, but if the lack of the feature provides no advantage, and its presence provides no disadvantage, the feature may not be phased out by natural selection and persist across species
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Tooth Enamel
Tooth
Tooth
enamel is one of the four major tissues that make up the tooth in humans and many other animals, including some species of fish. It makes up the normally visible part of the tooth, covering the crown. The other major tissues are dentin, cementum, and dental pulp
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Mandible
The mandible, lower jaw or jawbone is the largest, strongest and lowest bone in the human face.[2] It forms the lower jaw and holds the lower teeth in place. The mandible sits beneath the maxilla. The mandible is the only movable bone of the skull not counting the ossicles of the middle ear. The bone is formed from a fusion of left and right processes, and the point where these sides join, the mandibular symphysis, is still visible as a faint ridge in the midline
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Cassowary
Casuarius
Casuarius
casuarius Southern cassowary Casuarius
Casuarius
unappendiculatus Northern cassowary Casuarius
Casuarius
bennetti Dwarf cassowary † Casuarius
Casuarius
lydekkeri Pygmy cassowarySynonymsCasoarius Bont. Cela Oken1816 Cela Moehr 1752 nomen rejectum Rhea Lacépède 1800 non Latham 1790 Chelarga Billberg 1828 Oxyporus Brookes 1828 Thrasys Billberg 1828 Cassowara Perry 1811 Hippalectryo Gloger 1842[2]Cassowaries (/ˈkæsəwɛəri/), genus Casuarius, are ratites (flightless birds without a keel on their sternum bone) that are native to the tropical forests of New Guinea
New Guinea
(Papua New Guinea
New Guinea
and Indonesia), nearby islands, and northeastern Australia.[3] There are three extant species
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Navajo
The Navajo
Navajo
(/næv.ə.hoʊ/; British English: Navaho, Navajo: Diné or Naabeehó) are a Native American people of the Southwestern United States. The Navajo people
Navajo people
are politically divided between two federally recognized tribes, the Navajo Nation
Navajo Nation
and the Colorado River Indian Tribes. At more than 300,000 enrolled tribal members as of 2015[update][1][2], the Navajo Nation
Navajo Nation
is the second largest federally recognized tribe in the U.S. (the Cherokee Nation
Cherokee Nation
being the largest), and has the largest reservation in the country. The reservation straddles the Four Corners region and covers more than 27,000 square miles of land in Arizona, Utah, and New Mexico
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Northern Arizona
Northern Arizona
Arizona
is an unofficial, colloquially-defined region of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Arizona. Generally consisting of Coconino County, Yavapai County, Navajo County, and Apache County, it is geographically dominated by the Colorado Plateau, the southern border of which in Arizona
Arizona
is called the Mogollon Rim. Mohave County, located in the northwest of the state, may or may not be considered part of Northern Arizona, depending on local opinions.Contents1 Demographics 2 Geography2.1 National Parks and Monuments 2.2 Natural Attractions 2.3 Other Attractions3 See also 4 ReferencesDemographics[edit] Flagstaff is the largest city in Northern Arizona. Other cities in the region include Prescott, Sedona, Page, and Williams
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Period (geology)
A geologic period is one of several subdivisions of geologic time enabling cross-referencing of rocks and geologic events from place to place. These periods form elements of a hierarchy of divisions into which geologists have split the Earth's history. Eons and eras are larger subdivisions than periods while periods themselves may be divided into epochs and ages. The rocks formed during a period belong to a stratigraphic unit called a system.Contents1 Structure 2 Correlation issues 3 See also 4 ReferencesStructure[edit] The twelve currently recognised periods of the present eon – the Phanerozoic
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Genus
A genus (/ˈdʒiːnəs/, pl. genera /ˈdʒɛnərə/) is a taxonomic rank used in the biological classification of living and fossil organisms in biology. In the hierarchy of biological classification, genus comes above species and below family. In binomial nomenclature, the genus name forms the first part of the binomial species name for each species within the genus.E.g. Felis catus
Felis catus
and Felis silvestris
Felis silvestris
are two species within the genus Felis. Felis
Felis
is a genus within the family Felidae.The composition of a genus is determined by a taxonomist. The standards for genus classification are not strictly codified, so different authorities often produce different classifications for genera
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Megaannum
A year is the orbital period of the Earth
Earth
moving in its orbit around the Sun. Due to the Earth's axial tilt, the course of a year sees the passing of the seasons, marked by changes in weather, the hours of daylight, and, consequently, vegetation and soil fertility. In temperate and subpolar regions around the planet, four seasons are generally recognized: spring, summer, autumn and winter. In tropical and subtropical regions several geographical sectors do not present defined seasons; but in the seasonal tropics, the annual wet and dry seasons are recognized and tracked. The current year is 2018. A calendar year is an approximation of the number of days of the Earth's orbital period as counted in a given calendar. The Gregorian, or modern, calendar, presents its calendar year to be either a common year of 365 days or a leap year of 366 days, as do the Julian calendars; see below
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Binomial Nomenclature
Binomial nomenclature
Binomial nomenclature
("two-term naming system") also called binominal nomenclature ("two-name naming system") or binary nomenclature, is a formal system of naming species of living things by giving each a name composed of two parts, both of which use Latin
Latin
grammatical forms, although they can be based on words from other languages. Such a name is called a binomial name (which may be shortened to just "binomial"), a binomen, binominal name or a scientific name; more informally it is also called a Latin
Latin
name. The first part of the name identifies the genus to which the species belongs; the second part – the specific name or specific epithet – identifies the species within the genus. For example, humans belong to the genus Homo
Homo
and within this genus to the species Homo
Homo
sapiens
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