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Die Zauberflote
The Magic Flute
Flute
(German: Die Zauberflöte), K. 620, is an opera in two acts by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
to a German libretto by Emanuel Schikaneder. The work is in the form of a Singspiel, a popular form that included both singing and spoken dialogue.[a] The work premiered on 30 September 1791 at Schikaneder's theatre, the Freihaus-Theater auf der Wieden in Vienna, just two months before the composer's premature death. In the opera the Queen of the Night persuades Prince Tamino to rescue her daughter Pamina from captivity under the high priest Sarastro; instead, he learns the high ideals of Sarastro's community and seeks to join it. Separately, then together, Tamino and Pamina undergo severe trials of initiation, which end in triumph, with the Queen and her cohorts vanquished
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The Magic Flute (other)
The Magic Flute
The Magic Flute
(1791) is an opera by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Other notable works with this title include:Contents1 Ballet 2 Film 3 Literature 4 Musicals 5 Opera 6 See alsoBallet[edit] The Magic Flute
The Magic Flute
(ballet) (1893) by Lev Ivanov to music by Riccardo DrigoFilm[edit] The Magic Flute
The Magic Flute
(1975 film), Swedish: Trollflöjten, by Ingmar Bergman The Smurfs and the Magic Flute, 1976 Belgian animated film The Magic Flute
The Magic Flute
(2006 film) by Kenneth Branagh Magic Flute Diaries
Magic Flute Diaries
(2008), a film by Kevin SullivanLiterature[edit] Krishnavatara (The Magic Flute), the first of a series of novels based on the Indian epic Mahabharata and the life of Krishna by K. M
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Allgemeine Musikalische Zeitung
The Allgemeine musikalische Zeitung
Allgemeine musikalische Zeitung
(General music newspaper) was a German-language periodical published in the 19th century
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Franz Xaver Gerl
Franz Xaver Gerl ((1764-11-30)30 November 1764 – (1827-03-09)9 March 1827) was a bass singer and composer of the classical era. He sang the role of Sarastro in the premiere of Mozart's opera The Magic Flute.[1]Contents1 Life 2 Assessment 3 Family 4 Notes 5 ReferencesLife[edit] Gerl was born on (1764-11-30)30 November 1764 in Andorf
Andorf
(then Bavaria, since 1780 part of Austria). He sang as a chorister as a child in Salzburg; the New Grove
New Grove
asserts that he was probably the pupil of Leopold Mozart. He attended the University of Salzburg, studying logic and physics
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Josepha Weber
(Maria) Josepha Weber
Josepha Weber
(later Josepha Hofer, Josepha Meier; 1758 – December 29, 1819) was a German soprano of the classical era. She was a sister-in-law of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, and the first to perform the role of The Queen of the Night in Mozart's opera The Magic Flute (1791).Contents1 Life 2 Assessment 3 Notes 4 ReferencesLife[edit] She was born in Zell im Wiesental, in present-day Baden-Württemberg, Germany, the daughter of Fridolin Weber. She had three younger sisters (in descending order of age): Aloysia, who was an early love interest of Mozart and sang in his later operas; Constanze, who married Mozart in 1782;[1] and Sophie. The composer Carl Maria von Weber
Carl Maria von Weber
was the son of her father's half brother. Josepha grew up mostly in Mannheim, and moved with her family first to Munich
Munich
then to Vienna, following the singing career of her sister Aloysia
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Maynard Solomon
Maynard Solomon (born January 5, 1930) was a co-founder of Vanguard Records as well as a music producer.[1] More recently, he has become known for his work on Viennese Classical music, specifically Beethoven (writing an influential biography and an award-winning collection of essays), Mozart
Mozart
(biography), and Schubert
Schubert
(Solomon was the first to openly propose Schubert's homosexuality in a scholarly setting).[2]Contents1 Career in the recording industry 2 As musicologist 3 Selected discography of records produced by Maynard Solomon 4 Bibliography 5 References 6 External linksCareer in the recording industry[edit] Maynard Solomon founded Vanguard Records jointly with his brother Seymour Solomon in 1950. The label was one of the prime movers in the folk and blues boom for the next fifteen years
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Constanze Mozart
Maria Constanze Cäcilia Josepha Johanna Aloysia Mozart (née Weber) (5 January 1762 – 6 March 1842) was an Austrian woman who trained as a singer. She married twice, her first husband being Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, and was later, jointly with her second husband Georg Nikolaus von Nissen, Mozart's biographer. She and Mozart had six children: Karl Thomas Mozart, Franz Xaver Wolfgang Mozart, and four who died in infancy.Contents1 Early years 2 Marriage to Mozart 3 After Mozart's death 4 Influences on Mozart's music 5 Treatment by biographers 6 Alleged photograph 7 Legacy 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksEarly years[edit] Constanze Weber was born in Zell im Wiesental, a town near Lörrach
Lörrach
in Baden-Württemberg, in the south-west of Germany, then Further Austria. Her mother was Cäcilia Weber, née Stamm
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Baden Bei Wien
Baden (German for "Baths"),[2] unofficially distinguished from other Badens as Baden bei Wien
Baden bei Wien
(Baden near Vienna),[3] is a spa town in Austria. It serves as the capital of Baden District in the state of Lower Austria. Located about 26 km (16 mi) south of Vienna, the municipality consists of cadastral Baden, Braiten, Gamingerhof, Leesdorf, Mitterberg, Rauhenstein, and Weikersdorf.Contents1 Geography 2 History 3 Transportation 4 Government 5 Population 6 Notable people6.1 Natives 6.2 Residents7 Notes 8 References8.1 Citations 8.2 Bibliography9 External linksGeography[edit]The "Cure Park" (Kurpark) entranceBaden is located at the mouth of the Schwechat River's St Helena Valley (Helenenthal)[4] in the Vienna
Vienna
Woods (Wienerwald) range
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Lviv
Lviv
Lviv
(Ukrainian: Львів [lʲʋiu̯] ( listen); Russian: Львов Lvov; Polish: Lwów[2] [lvuf] ( listen); German: Lemberg; see also other names) is the largest city in western Ukraine and the seventh-largest city in the country overall, with a population of around 728,350 as of 2016. Lviv
Lviv
is one of the main cultural centres of Ukraine. Named in honor of Leo, the eldest son of Daniel, King of Ruthenia, it was the capital of the Kingdom of Galicia–Volhynia
Kingdom of Galicia–Volhynia
(also called Kingdom of Rus')[3] from 1272 to 1349, when it was conquered by King Casimir III the Great
Casimir III the Great
who then became known as the King of Poland
Poland
and Rus'. From 1434, it was the regional capital of the Ruthenian Voivodeship in the Kingdom of Poland
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Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart And Prague
There is no question that the Praguers of the late eighteenth century exhibited a special appreciation for the music of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, even though, as recently pointed out by Daniel E. Freeman, confirmations of this fact attributed to Mozart himself in sayings such as "Meine Prager verstehen mich" ("My Praguers understand me") have only come down to posterity second or third hand.[1] Perhaps the most valuable direct testimony that attests to the discernment of the musical public in Prague with regard to Mozart's music comes from Lorenzo Da Ponte, the librettist of Mozart's opera Don Giovanni, which was first performed in Prague:It is not easy to convey an adequate conception of the enthusiasm of the Bohemians for [Mozart's] music
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Ludwig Wenzel Lachnith
Ludwig Wenzel Lachnith
Ludwig Wenzel Lachnith
(Prague, July 7, 1746 – Paris, October 3, 1820)[1] was a Bohemian horn player and versatile composer influenced by Joseph Haydn
Joseph Haydn
and Ignaz Pleyel. Today he is chiefly remembered because of his adaptions of operas by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. The French composer and writer Hector Berlioz
Hector Berlioz
immortalized him in a diatribe in his autobiography.Contents1 Biography 2 Lachnith’s adaption of Mozart’s Magic Flute
Magic Flute
– critique2.1 Hector Berlioz 2.2 Otto Jahn3 Works (selection)3.1 Operas 3.2 Oratorios 3.3 Orchestral music 3.4 Chamber music 3.5 Instruction manuals4 References 5 SourcesBiography[edit] Zweibrücken
Zweibrücken
Castle (modern view)Lachnith was born in Prague
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Bonn
The Federal City of Bonn
Bonn
(German pronunciation: [ˈbɔn] ( listen)) is a city on the banks of the Rhine
Rhine
in the German state of North Rhine-Westphalia, with a population of over 300,000. About 24 km (15 mi) south-southeast of Cologne, Bonn
Bonn
is in the southernmost part of the Rhine-Ruhr
Rhine-Ruhr
region, Germany's largest metropolitan area, with over 11 million inhabitants. Because of a political compromise following German reunification, the German state maintains a substantial presence in Bonn, and the city is considered a second, unofficial, capital of the country.[2] Bonn
Bonn
is the secondary seat of the President, the Chancellor, the Bundesrat and the primary seat of six federal government ministries and twenty federal authorities
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Nikolaus Simrock
Nikolaus Simrock
Nikolaus Simrock
(23 August 1751 in Mainz
Mainz
– 12 June 1832 in Bonn) was a German horn player at the court of the Elector of Cologne in Bonn
Bonn
and a music publisher. He was a friend of Ludwig van Beethoven and founder of the N. Simrock music publishing house.[1] "Highly esteemed as a man and a musician", he remained in contact with Beethoven throughout the 1790s and is a regarded as a "reliable witness" to Beethoven's years in Bonn.[2][3] Biography[edit] Simrock was born in Mainz
Mainz
the son of a corporal and was a horn player in a French military chapel before age 16. He applied at the Cologne Elector Maximilian Frederick for a job in the Bonn
Bonn
court orchestra. He began working there in April 1775 as "bugler" with an annual salary of 300 florins
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Mozart And Freemasonry
For the last seven years of his life Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
was a Mason. The Masonic order played an important role in his life and work.Contents1 Mozart's lodges 2 Masonic ideology and Masonic music 3 List of Mozart's Masonic compositions 4 List of fellow Masons 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksMozart's lodges[edit] Mozart was admitted as an apprentice to the Viennese Masonic lodge called "Zur Wohltätigkeit" ("Beneficence") on 14 December 1784.[2] He was promoted to journeyman Mason on 7 January 1785, and became a master Mason "shortly thereafter".[2] Mozart also attended the meetings of another lodge, called "Zur wahren Eintracht" ("True Concord"). According to Otto Erich Deutsch, this lodge was "the largest and most aristocratic in Vienna. ..
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In Alt
This is a list of musical terms that are likely to be encountered in printed scores, music reviews, and program notes. Most of the terms are Italian (see also Italian musical terms used in English), in accordance with the Italian origins of many European musical conventions. Sometimes, the special musical meanings of these phrases differ from the original or current Italian meanings. Most of the other terms are taken from French and German, indicated by "Fr." and "Ger.", respectively. Unless specified, the terms are Italian or English. The list can never be complete: some terms are common, and others are used only occasionally, and new ones are coined from time to time
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Ignaz Alberti
Ignaz Alberti
Ignaz Alberti
(11 April 1760, in Vienna
Vienna
- 31 August 1794, in Vienna) was an Austrian illustrator, engraver and book printer. He employed some 20 engravers in 1787 who applied their skills to cartography and botanical books. After his untimely death his widow managed the printing and publication.[1] His 1796 Vienna
Vienna
edition of the New Testament
New Testament
was printed and published by his widow, was banned by the Catholic Church, and appeared without imprimatur. Alberti engraved and printed the frontispiece for the original libretto of Mozart's Die Zauberflöte
Die Zauberflöte
in Vienna
Vienna
in 1791
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