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Didelphodon
Didelphodon
Didelphodon
vorax Marsh, 1889 (type) Didelphodon
Didelphodon
padanicus Cope, 1892 Didelphodon
Didelphodon
coyi Fox & Naylor, 1986 Didelphodon
Didelphodon
(from Didelph[is] "opossum" plus ὀδών odōn "tooth") is a genus of stagodont metatherians from the Late Cretaceous of North America.[1]Contents1 Description 2 Discovery 3 Classification 4 Paleobiology 5 References 6 Further readingDescription[edit]Skull cast of Didelphodon
Didelphodon
in the Rocky Mountain Dinosaur Resource Center in Woodland Park, CO; collected in Harding County, SD.Although perhaps little larger than a Virginia opossum, with a maximum skull length of 12.21 centimetres (4.81 in) and a weight of 5 kilograms (11 lb),[2] Didelphodon
Didelphodon
was a large mammal by Mesozoic standards
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Late Cretaceous
The Late Cretaceous
Cretaceous
(100.5–66 Ma) is the younger of two epochs into which the Cretaceous
Cretaceous
period is divided in the geologic timescale. Rock strata from this epoch form the Upper Cretaceous
Cretaceous
series
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Scollard Formation
The Scollard Formation
Scollard Formation
is an Upper Cretaceous
Cretaceous
to lower Palaeocene stratigraphic unit of the Western Canada
Canada
Sedimentary Basin in southwestern Alberta.[1][3] Its deposition spanned the time interval from latest Cretaceous
Cretaceous
to early Paleocene, and it includes sediments that were deposited before, during, and after the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) extinction event
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Didelphis
Didelphis
Didelphis
is a genus of New World
New World
mammals. The six species in the genus Didelphis, commonly known as large American opossums, are members of the order Didelphimorphia. The genus is composed of cat-sized omnivorous species, which can be recognized by their prehensile tails and their tendency to "play possum" (feign death) when cornered. The largest species, the Virginia opossum
Virginia opossum
(Didelphis virginiana), is the only marsupial to be found in North America
North America
north of Mexico. References[edit]^ Gardner, A. (2005). Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M., eds. Mammal
Mammal
Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press. p. 5
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Megaannum
A year is the orbital period of the Earth
Earth
moving in its orbit around the Sun. Due to the Earth's axial tilt, the course of a year sees the passing of the seasons, marked by changes in weather, the hours of daylight, and, consequently, vegetation and soil fertility. In temperate and subpolar regions around the planet, four seasons are generally recognized: spring, summer, autumn and winter. In tropical and subtropical regions several geographical sectors do not present defined seasons; but in the seasonal tropics, the annual wet and dry seasons are recognized and tracked. The current year is 2018. A calendar year is an approximation of the number of days of the Earth's orbital period as counted in a given calendar. The Gregorian, or modern, calendar, presents its calendar year to be either a common year of 365 days or a leap year of 366 days, as do the Julian calendars; see below
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Virginia Opossum
Didelphis
Didelphis
marsupialis virginiana[3]The Virginia opossum
Virginia opossum
( Didelphis
Didelphis
virginiana), commonly known as the North American opossum, is a marsupial found in North America. It is the only marsupial found north of Mexico. In the United States, it is typically referred to simply as a possum. It is a solitary and nocturnal animal about the size of a domestic cat. It is a successful opportunist. It is familiar to many North Americans as it is often seen near towns, rummaging through garbage cans.Contents1 Name 2 Range 3 Description3.1 Tracks 3.2 Behavior 3.3 Reproduction 3.4 Life span4 Historical references 5 Relationship with humans 6 References 7 External linksName[edit] The Virginia opossum
Virginia opossum
is the original animal named "opossum". The word comes from Algonquian wapathemwa meaning "white animal"
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Durophagy
Durophagy
Durophagy
is the eating behavior of animals that consume hard-shelled or exoskeleton bearing organisms, such as corals, shelled mollusks, or crabs.[1] It is mostly used to describe fish, but is also used when describing reptiles,[2] including fossil turtles,[3] placodonts and invertebrates, as well as "bone-crushing" mammalian carnivores such as hyenas.[4] Durophagy
Durophagy
requires special adaptions, such as blunt, strong teeth and a heavy jaw.[5] Bite force is necessary to overcome the physical constraints of consuming more durable prey and gain a competitive advantage over other organisms by gaining access to more diverse or exclusive food resources earlier in life.[6] Those with greater bite forces require less time to consume certain prey items as a greater bite force can increase the net rate of energy intake when foraging and enhance fitness in durophagous species
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Carnassial
Carnassials are paired upper and lower teeth (either molars or premolars and molars) modified in such a way as to allow enlarged and often self-sharpening edges to pass by each other in a shearing manner. The modification arose separately in several groups of carnivorous mammals. Different pairs of teeth were involved in the separate modifications. In modern Carnivora, the carnassials are the modified fourth upper premolar and the first lower molar
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Lance Formation
The Lance (Creek) Formation is a division of Late Cretaceous (dating to about 69 - 66 Ma) rocks in the western United States. Named after Lance Creek, Wyoming, the microvertebrate fossils and dinosaurs represent important components of the latest Mesozoic
Mesozoic
vertebrate faunas
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Frenchman Formation
The Frenchman Formation
Frenchman Formation
is stratigraphic unit of Late Cretaceous
Cretaceous
(late Maastrichtian) age in the Western Canada
Canada
Sedimentary Basin. It is present in southern Saskatchewan
Saskatchewan
and the Cypress Hills of southeastern Alberta. The formation was defined by G.M. Furnival in 1942[2] from observations of outcrops along the Frenchman River, between Ravenscrag and Highway 37
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Maastrichtian
The Maastrichtian
Maastrichtian
( /mɑːˈstrɪktiən/) is, in the ICS geologic timescale, the latest age (uppermost stage) of the Late Cretaceous epoch or Upper Cretaceous
Cretaceous
series, the Cretaceous
Cretaceous
period or system, and of the Mesozoic
Mesozoic
era or erathem. It spanned the interval from 72.1 to 66 million years ago
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Type Species
In zoological nomenclature, a type species (species typica) is the species name with which the name of a genus or subgenus is considered to be permanently taxonomically associated, i.e., the species that contains the biological type specimen(s).[1] A similar concept is used for suprageneric groups called a type genus. In botanical nomenclature, these terms have no formal standing under the code of nomenclature, but are sometimes borrowed from zoological nomenclature. In botany, the type of a genus name is a specimen (or, rarely, an illustration) which is also the type of a species name. The species name that has that type can also be referred to as the type of the genus name
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Didelphimorphia
Several; see textDiversity108 speciesThe opossum (/əˈpɒsəm/) is a marsupial of the order Didelphimorphia (/daɪˌdɛlfɪˈmɔːrfiə/) endemic to the Americas. The largest order of marsupials in the Western Hemisphere, it comprises 103 or more species in 19 genera. Opossums originated in South America
South America
and entered North America
North America
in the Great American Interchange following the connection of the two continents
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Order (biology)
In biological classification, the order (Latin: ordo) isa taxonomic rank used in the classification of organisms and recognized by the nomenclature codes. Other well-known ranks are life, domain, kingdom, phylum, class, family, genus, and species, with order fitting in between class and family. An immediately higher rank, superorder, may be added directly above order, while suborder would be a lower rank. a taxonomic unit, a taxon, in that rank. In that case the plural is orders (Latin ordines).Example: All owls belong to the order Strigiformes.What does and does not belong to each order is determined by a taxonomist, as is whether a particular order should be recognized at all. Often there is no exact agreement, with different taxonomists each taking a different position. There are no hard rules that a taxonomist needs to follow in describing or recognizing an order
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Alphadontidae
Alphadontidae was a family of small, primitive mammal that was a member of the metatherians, a group of mammals that includes modern-day marsupials. References[edit]Taxon identifiersWd: Q11904934 EoL: 4524940 Fossilworks: 6
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Theria
Theria
Theria
(/ˈθɪəriə/; Greek: θηρίον, wild beast) is a subclass of mammals[2] amongst the Theriiformes (the sister taxa to Yinotheria). Theria
Theria
includes the eutherians (including the placental mammals) and the metatherians (including the marsupials).Contents1 Characteristics 2 Evolution 3 Taxonomy 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksCharacteristics[edit] Therian mammals give birth to live young without a shelled egg. It is possible thanks to key proteins called syncytins, which allow exchanges between the mother and its offspring through a placenta; even rudimental ones such as the marsupials. Genetic studies have enlighted the viral origin of syncytins through the endogenization process.[3] The marsupials and the placental mammals evolved from a common therian ancestor that gave live-birth by suppressing the mother's immune system
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