HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Deux-Sèvres
Deux-Sèvres
Deux-Sèvres
(French pronunciation: ​[dø sɛvʁ]) is a French department. Deux-Sèvres
Deux-Sèvres
literally means "two Sèvres": the Sèvre Nantaise and the Sèvre Niortaise
Sèvre Niortaise
are two rivers which have their sources in the department.Contents1 History 2 Geography and economics 3 Transport 4 Sights 5 Births 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] Deux-Sèvres
Deux-Sèvres
was one of the 83 original départements created during the French Revolution
French Revolution
on March 4, 1790. Departmental borders were changed in 1973 when the inhabitants of the little commune of Puy-Saint-Bonnet became formally associated with the rapidly growing adjacent commune of Cholet. Cholet
Cholet
is in the neighbouring department of Maine-et-Loire
[...More...]

"Deux-Sèvres" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Faience
Faience
Faience
or faïence (/faɪˈɑːns/ or /feɪ-/; French: [fajɑ̃s]) is the conventional name in English for fine tin-glazed pottery on a delicate pale buff earthenware body. It is originally associated by French speakers with wares exported from Faenza
Faenza
in northern Italy.[1] The invention of a white pottery glaze suitable for painted decoration, by the addition of an oxide of tin to the slip of a lead glaze, was a major advance in the history of pottery. The invention seems to have been made in Iran or the Middle East before the ninth century. A kiln capable of producing temperatures exceeding 1,000 °C (1,830 °F) was required to achieve this result, the result of millennia of refined pottery-making traditions
[...More...]

"Faience" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Time Zone
A time zone is a region of the globe that observes a uniform standard time for legal, commercial, and social purposes. Time
Time
zones tend to follow the boundaries of countries and their subdivisions because it is convenient for areas in close commercial or other communication to keep the same time. Most of the time zones on land are offset from Coordinated Universal Time
Time
(UTC) by a whole number of hours ( UTC−12
UTC−12
to UTC+14), but a few zones are offset by 30 or 45 minutes (e.g. Newfoundland Standard Time is UTC−03:30, Nepal
Nepal
Standard Time
Time
is UTC+05:45, and Indian Standard Time
Time
is UTC+05:30). Some higher latitude and temperate zone countries use daylight saving time for part of the year, typically by adjusting local clock time by an hour
[...More...]

"Time Zone" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Cholet
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Cholet
Cholet
(French pronunciation: ​[ʃɔlɛ], locally [ʃɔle], probably from Latin cauletum, "cabbage") is a commune of western France
France
in the Maine-et-Loire
Maine-et-Loire
department. It was the capital of military Vendée.Contents1 Demographics 2 Geography 3 History 4 Sights 5 Economy 6 Transport 7 Sport 8 Twin towns 9 Notable people 10 See also 11 References 12 External linksDemographics[edit] In 1906 the population was 16,554, and 54,632 in 2006. Geography[edit] Cholet
Cholet
stands on an eminence on the right bank of the Moine, which used to be crossed by a bridge from the fifteenth century
[...More...]

"Cholet" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Estuary
An estuary is a partially enclosed coastal body of brackish water with one or more rivers or streams flowing into it, and with a free connection to the open sea.[1] Estuaries form a transition zone between river environments and maritime environments. They are subject both to marine influences—such as tides, waves, and the influx of saline water—and to riverine influences—such as flows of fresh water and sediment. The mixing of sea water and fresh water provide high levels of nutrients both in the water column and in sediment, making estuaries among the most productive natural habitats in the world.[2] Most existing estuaries formed during the Holocene
Holocene
epoch with the flooding of river-eroded or glacially scoured valleys when the sea level began to rise about 10,000–12,000 years ago.[3] Estuaries are typically classified according to their geomorphological features or to water-circulation patterns
[...More...]

"Estuary" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Arable Land
Arable land
Arable land
(from Latin arabilis, "able to be plowed") is, according to one definition, land capable of being ploughed and used to grow crops.[1] In Britain, it was traditionally contrasted with pasturable land such as heaths which could be used for sheep-rearing but not farmland. A quite different kind of definition is used by various agencies concerned with agriculture. In providing statistics on arable land, the FAO
FAO
and the World
World
Bank[2] use the definition offered in the glossary accompanying FAOSTAT: " Arable land
Arable land
is the land under temporary agricultural crops (multiple-cropped areas are counted only once), temporary meadows for mowing or pasture, land under market and kitchen gardens and land temporarily fallow (less than five years). The abandoned land resulting from shifting cultivation is not included in this category
[...More...]

"Arable Land" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Wheat
References:   Serial No. 42236 ITIS 2002-09-22 Wheat
Wheat
is a grass widely cultivated for its seed, a cereal grain which is a worldwide staple food.[1][2][3] There are many species of wheat which together make up the genus Triticum; the most widely grown is common wheat (T. aestivum). The archaeological record suggests that wheat was first cultivated in the regions of the Fertile Crescent
Fertile Crescent
around 9600 BCE
[...More...]

"Wheat" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Oat
The oat ( Avena
Avena
sativa), sometimes called the common oat, is a species of cereal grain grown for its seed, which is known by the same name (usually in the plural, unlike other cereals and pseudocereals). While oats are suitable for human consumption as oatmeal and rolled oats, one of the most common uses is as livestock feed
[...More...]

"Oat" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Potato
The potato is a starchy, tuberous crop from the perennial nightshade Solanum
Solanum
tuberosum. Potato
Potato
may be applied to both the plant and the edible tuber.[2] Potatoes have become a staple food in many parts of the world and an integral part of much of the world's food supply. Potatoes are the world's fourth-largest food crop, following maize (corn), wheat, and rice.[3] The green leaves and green skins of tubers exposed to the light are toxic. In the Andes, where the species is indigenous, some other closely related species are cultivated. Potatoes were introduced to Europe in the second half of the 16th century by the Spanish
[...More...]

"Potato" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Apple
An apple is a sweet, edible fruit produced by an apple tree (Malus pumila). Apple
Apple
trees are cultivated worldwide as a fruit tree, and is the most widely grown species in the genus Malus. The tree originated in Central Asia, where its wild ancestor, Malus
Malus
sieversii, is still found today. Apples have been grown for thousands of years in Asia
Asia
and Europe, and were brought to North America by European colonists. Apples have religious and mythological significance in many cultures, including Norse, Greek and European Christian traditions. Apple
Apple
trees are large if grown from seed. Generally apple cultivars are propagated by grafting onto rootstocks, which control the size of the resulting tree. There are more than 7,500 known cultivars of apples, resulting in a range of desired characteristics
[...More...]

"Apple" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Arrondissements Of France
(including overseas)Departments (including overseas)ArrondissementsCantonsIntercommunality Métropole Communauté urbaine Communauté d'agglomération Communauté de communesCommunes Associated communes Municipal arrondissementsOthers in Overseas France Overseas collectivities Sui generis collectivity Overseas country Overseas territory Clipperton IslandAn arrondissement (French pronunciation: ​[aʁɔ̃dismɑ̃])[1] is a level of administrative division in France. As of 2016[update], the 101 French departments were divided into 334 arrondissements (including 12 overseas).[2] The capital of an arrondissement is called a subprefecture
[...More...]

"Arrondissements Of France" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

UTC+2
UTC+02:00 is an identifier for a time offset from UTC of +02. In ISO 8601 the associated time would be written as 2018-04-06T10:17:05+02:00
[...More...]

"UTC+2" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Central European Summer Time
Central European Summer Time
European Summer Time
(CEST), sometime referred also as Central European Daylight Time (CEDT), is the standard clock time observed during the period of summer daylight-saving in those European countries which observe Central European Time
Central European Time
(UTC+1) during the other part of the year. It corresponds to UTC+2, which makes it the same as Central Africa Time, South African Standard Time
South African Standard Time
and Kaliningrad Time in Russia.Contents1 Names 2 Period of observation 3 Usage 4 See also 5 ReferencesNames[edit] Other names which have been applied to Central European Summer Time are Middle European Summer Time
European Summer Time
(MEST), Central European Daylight Saving Time (CEDT), and Bravo Time (after the second letter of the NATO phonetic alphabet)
[...More...]

"Central European Summer Time" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Daylight Saving Time
Daylight saving time
Daylight saving time
(abbreviated DST), sometimes referred to as daylight savings time in US, Canadian and Australian speech,[1][2] and known as British Summer Time
British Summer Time
(BST) in the UK and just summer time in some countries, is the practice of advancing clocks during summer months so that evening daylight lasts longer, while sacrificing normal sunrise times. Typically, regions that use daylight saving time adjust clocks forward one hour close to the start of spring and adjust them backward in the autumn to standard time.[3] George Hudson proposed the idea of daylight saving in 1895.[4] The German Empire
German Empire
and Austria-Hungary
Austria-Hungary
organized the first nationwide implementation, starting on April 30, 1916
[...More...]

"Daylight Saving Time" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

UTC+1
UTC+01:00, known simply as UTC+1, is a time offset that adds 1 hour to Coordinated Universal Time
Coordinated Universal Time
(UTC). This time is used in:Central European Time West Africa Time Western European Summer TimeBritish Summer Time Irish Standard TimeRomance Standard Time (Microsoft Windows Control panel) Swatch Internet Time EVE OnlineIn ISO 8601 the
[...More...]

"UTC+1" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Central European Time
Central European Time
Central European Time
(CET), used in most parts of Europe
Europe
and a few North African
North African
countries, is a standard time which is 1 hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time
Coordinated Universal Time
(UTC). The time offset from UTC
UTC
can be written as +01:00
[...More...]

"Central European Time" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.