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Despotate Of Epirus
The Despotate of Epirus
Epirus
(Greek: Δεσποτάτο της Ηπείρου) was one of the successor states of the Byzantine Empire established in the aftermath of the Fourth Crusade
Fourth Crusade
in 1204 by a branch of the Angelos dynasty. It claimed to be the legitimate successor of the Byzantine Empire, along with the Empire of Nicaea
Empire of Nicaea
and the Empire of Trebizond, its rulers briefly proclaiming themselves as Emperors in 1225/1227–1242 (during which it is most often called the Empire of Thessalonica)
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Angelokastro, Aetolia-Acarnania
Angelokastro (Greek: Αγγελόκαστρο) is a village and a former municipality in Aetolia-Acarnania, West Greece, Greece. Since the 2011 local government reform it is part of the municipality Agrinio, of which it is a municipal unit.[2] The municipal unit has an area of 55.726 km2.[3] References[edit]^ a b "Απογραφή Πληθυσμού - Κατοικιών 2011. ΜΟΝΙΜΟΣ Πληθυσμός" (in Greek). Hellenic Statistical Authority.  ^ Kallikratis law Greece
Greece
Ministry of Interior (in Greek) ^ "Population & housing census 2001 (incl. area and average elevation)" (PDF) (in Greek)
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Greek Language
Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά elliniká) is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece, Cyprus
Cyprus
and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean and the Black Sea. It has the longest documented history of any living Indo-European language, spanning more than 3000 years of written records.[3] Its writing system has been the
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Vassal
A vassal[1] is a person regarded as having a mutual obligation to a lord or monarch, in the context of the feudal system in medieval Europe. The obligations often included military support and mutual protection, in exchange for certain privileges, usually including land held as a tenant or fief.[2] The term is applied to similar arrangements in other feudal societies. In contrast, fealty (fidelitas) was sworn, unconditional loyalty to a monarch.[3]Contents1 Western vassalage 2 Difference between "vassal" and "vassal state" 3 Feudal
Feudal
Japanese equivalents 4 See also4.1 Similar terms5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksWestern vassalage[edit] In fully developed vassalage, the lord and the vassal would take part in a commendation ceremony composed of two parts, the homage and the fealty, including the use of Christian sacraments to show its sacred importance
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John III Vatatzes
The Vatatzes
Vatatzes
or Batatzes (Greek: Βατάτζης) family was a noble Byzantine
Byzantine
family of the 11th–14th centuries with several branches, which produced several senior generals of the Byzantine
Byzantine
army and, after John III Doukas Vatatzes
John III Doukas Vatatzes
intermarried with the Laskaris, the ruling line of the Empire of Nicaea
Empire of Nicaea
until the usurpation of Michael VIII Palaiologos in 1261
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Historiographic
Historiography
Historiography
is the study of the methods of historians in developing history as an academic discipline, and by extension is any body of historical work on a particular subject. The historiography of a specific topic covers how historians have studied that topic using particular sources, techniques, and theoretical approaches. Scholars discuss historiography by topic – such as the "historiography of the United Kingdom", the "historiography of Canada", "historiography of the British Empire", the "historiography of early Islam", the "historiography of China" – and different approaches and genres, such as political history and social history. Beginning in the nineteenth century, with the ascent of academic history, there developed a body of historiographic literature
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Vonitsa
Vonitsa
Vonitsa
(Greek: Βόνιτσα) is a town in the northwestern part of Aetolia-Acarnania
Aetolia-Acarnania
in Greece, seat of the municipality of Aktio-Vonitsa. Population 4,916 (2011). The beach town is situated on the south coast of the Ambracian Gulf, and is dominated by a Venetian fortress on a hill. Vonitsa
Vonitsa
is 13 kilometres (8 miles) southeast of Preveza, 18 kilometres (11 miles) northeast of Lefkada (city)
Lefkada (city)
and 90 kilometres (56 miles) northwest of Agrinio
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High Medieval
Central Europe Guelf, Hohenstaufen, and Ascanian
Ascanian
domains in Germany about 1176         Duchy of Saxony          Margravate of Brandenburg          Duchy of Franconia         Duchy of Swabia          Duchy of BavariaThe High Middle Ages
Middle Ages
or High Medieval Period was the period of European history lasting from AD 1000 to 1250
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Ottoman Empire
The Ottoman Empire (/ˈɒtəmən/; Devlet-i ʿAlīye-i ʿOsmānīye[dn 5]), also historically known in Western Europe
Europe
as the Turkish Empire[8] or simply Turkey,[9] was a state that controlled much of southeastern Europe, western Asia and northern Africa between the 14th and early 20th centuries. It was founded at the end of the 13th century in northwestern Anatolia
Anatolia
in the town of Söğüt (modern-day Bilecik Province) by the Oghuz Turkish tribal leader Osman.[10] After 1354, the Ottomans crossed into Europe, and with the conquest of the Balkans, the Ottoman Beylik was transformed into a transcontinental empire
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Historiography
Historiography
Historiography
is the study of the methods of historians in developing history as an academic discipline, and by extension is any body of historical work on a particular subject. The historiography of a specific topic covers how historians have studied that topic using particular sources, techniques, and theoretical approaches. Scholars discuss historiography by topic—such as the historiography of the United Kingdom, that of WWII, the British Empire, early Islam, and China—and different approaches and genres, such as political history and social history. Beginning in the nineteenth century, with the development of academic history, there developed a body of historiographic literature
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Thrace
Thrace
Thrace
(/θreɪs/; Modern Greek: Θράκη, Thráke; Bulgarian: Тракия, Trakiya; Turkish: Trakya) is a geographical and historical area in southeast Europe, now split between Bulgaria, Greece
Greece
and Turkey, which is bounded by the Balkan Mountains
Balkan Mountains
to the north, the Aegean Sea
Aegean Sea
to the south and the Black Sea
Black Sea
to the east
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Adrianopolis
Edirne
Edirne
,Greek Αδριανούπολις / Adrianoupolis , is a city in the northwestern Turkish province of Edirne
Edirne
in the region of East Thrace, close to Turkey's borders with Greece
Greece
and Bulgaria. Edirne served as the third capital city of the Ottoman Empire
Ottoman Empire
from 1363 to 1453,[2] before Constantinople
Constantinople
(present-day Istanbul) became the empire's fourth and final capital
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Despotic Monarchy
Absolute monarchy, or despotic monarchy,[1][2] is a form of monarchy in which one ruler has supreme authority and where that authority is not restricted by any written laws, legislature, or customs.[3] These are often, but not always, hereditary monarchies
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Thessaly
Thessaly
Thessaly
(Greek: Θεσσαλία, Thessalía; ancient Thessalian: Πετθαλία, Petthalía) is a traditional geographic and modern administrative region of Greece, comprising most of the ancient region of the same name. Before the Greek Dark Ages, Thessaly
Thessaly
was known as Aeolia (Greek: Αἰολία, Aíolía), and appears thus in Homer's Odyssey. Thessaly
Thessaly
became part of the modern Greek state in 1881, after four and a half centuries of Ottoman rule. Since 1987 it has formed one of the country's 13 regions[2] and is further (since the Kallikratis reform of 2010) sub-divided into 5 regional units and 25 municipalities. The capital of the region is Larissa
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Alexios III Angelos
Alexios III Angelos (Greek: Αλέξιος Γ' Άγγελος) (c. 1153 – 1211) was Byzantine Emperor from March 1195 to July 17/18, 1203.[1] A member of the extended imperial family, Alexios came to throne after deposing, blinding, and imprisoning his younger brother Isaac II Angelos. The most significant event of his reign was the attack of the Fourth Crusade
Fourth Crusade
on Constantinople
Constantinople
in 1203, on behalf of Alexios IV Angelos. Alexios III took over the defense of the city, which he mismanaged, then fled the city at night with one of his three daughters. From Adrianople, and then Mosynopolis, he unsuccessfully attempted to rally his supporters, only to end up a captive of Marquis Boniface of Montferrat
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Battle Of Klokotnitsa
Krum's campaignsSerdica Pliska Debeltos Versinikia 1st Adrianople BurdizonSimeon I's campaignsWar of 894–896BoulgarophygonWar of 913–927Achelous Katasyrtai Pegae ConstantinopleSviatoslav's invasion of Bulgaria1st Arcadiopolis DorostolonByzantine conquest of BulgariaTrajan's Gates 1st Thessalonica Spercheios Skopje 2nd Thessalonica Kreta 3rd Thessalonica Kleidion Strumitsa Bitola Setina DyrrhachiumUprising of Peter Delyan4th Thessalonica 5th Thessalonica OstrovoSecond Bulgarian EmpireLovech Tryavna 2nd Arcadiopolis Serres Varna Klokotnitsa 2nd Adrianople Uprising of Ivaylo Devina Skafida RusokastroThe Battle of Klokotnitsa
Battle of Klokotnitsa
(Bulgarian: Битката при Клокотница, Bitkata pri Klokotnitsa) occurred on 9 March 1230 near the village of Klokotnitsa (today in Haskovo Province, Bulgaria)
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