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Desertion
In military terminology, desertion is the abandonment of a duty or post without permission (a pass, liberty or leave) and is done with the intention of not returning
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Abandonment (other)
Abandon, abandoned, or abandonment may refer to:Abandonment (emotional), a subjective emotional state in which people feel undesired, left behind, insecure, or discarded Abandonment (legal), a legal term regarding propertyChild abandonment, the extralegal abandonment of children Lost, mislaid, and abandoned property, legal status of property after abandonment and rediscoveryAbandonment (mysticism)Contents1 Art, entertainment, and media1.1 Film 1.2 Literature 1.3 Music 1.4 Television2 Other uses 3 See alsoArt, entertainment, and media[edit] Film[edit] Abandon (film), a 2002 film starring Katie HolmesAbandoned (1949 film), starring Dennis O'Keefe Abandoned (2001 film), a Hungarian film Abandoned (2010 film), starring Brittany Murphy Abandoned (2015 film),
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Charge (warfare)
A charge is a maneuver in battle in which combatants advance towards their enemy at their best speed in an attempt to engage in close combat. The charge is the dominant shock attack and has been the key tactic and decisive moment of many battles throughout history
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Cyberweapon
A cyberweapon is a malware agent employed for military, paramilitary, or intelligence objectives.[citation needed]Contents1 General characteristics1.1 Sponsor 1.2 Objectives 1.3 Target 1.4 Distinctions from viruses and other malware2 Probable cyberweapons 3 Control and disarmament 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksGeneral characteristics[edit] Requirements for the term vary widely; the most common criteria seem to be for a malware agent which:Is sponsored or employed by a state or non-state actor. Meets an objective which would otherwise require espionage or the use of force. Is employed against specific targets.Sponsor[edit] Part of the distinction from other malware is that the agent is sponsored—that is, commissioned, developed, and/or actually used—not by a black-hat hacker or organized criminal group, but instead by a state or a non-state actor, the latter potentially including terrorist groups and other entities proposed
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Electronic Warfare
Electronic warfare
Electronic warfare
(EW) is any action involving the use of the electromagnetic spectrum or directed energy to control the spectrum, attack of an enemy, or impede enemy assaults via the spectrum. The purpose of electronic warfare is to deny the opponent the advantage of, and ensure friendly unimpeded access to, the EM spectrum
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Infantry
Infantry
Infantry
is the branch of an army that engages in military combat on foot, distinguished from cavalry, artillery, and tank forces. Also known as foot soldiers, infantry traditionally relies on moving by foot between combats as well, but may also use mounts, military vehicles, or other transport
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Nuclear Warfare
Nuclear warfare
Nuclear warfare
(sometimes atomic warfare or thermonuclear warfare) is a military conflict or political strategy in which nuclear weaponry is used to inflict damage on the enemy. Nuclear weapons are weapons of mass destruction; in contrast to conventional warfare, nuclear warfare can produce destruction in a much shorter time and can have a long-lasting radiological warfare result
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Unconventional Warfare
Unconventional warfare
Unconventional warfare
(abbreviated UW) is the support of a foreign insurgency or resistance movement against its government or an occupying power. Whereas conventional warfare is used to reduce the opponent's military capability directly through attacks and maneuvers, unconventional warfare is an attempt to achieve victory indirectly through a proxy force.[1] UW contrasts with conventional warfare in that forces are often covert or not well-defined and it relies heavily on subversion and guerrilla warfare.Contents1 Objectives 2 Methods and organization 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksObjectives[edit] As with all forms of warfare, the general objective of unconventional warfare is to instill a belief that peace and security are not possible without compromise or concession. Two original definition are claiming: "The intent of U.S
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Military Tactics
Military
Military
tactics are the science and art of organizing a military force, and the techniques for combining and using weapons and military units to engage and defeat an enemy in battle.[1] Changes in philosophy and technology have been reflected in changes to military tactics. In contemporary military science, tactics are the lowest of three planning levels: (i) strategic, (ii) operational, and (iii) tactical. The highest level of planning is strategy: how force is translated into political objectives by bridging the means and ends of war. The intermediate level, operational, the conversion of strategy into tactics, deals with formations of units
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Air Combat Manoeuvring
Air combat manoeuvring
Air combat manoeuvring
(also known as ACM or dogfighting) is the tactical art of moving, turning and/or situating one's fighter aircraft in order to attain a position from which an attack can be made on another aircraft. Air combat manoeuvres rely on offensive and defensive basic fighter manoeuvring (BFM) to gain an advantage over an aerial opponent.Contents1 Historical overview 2 Tactics 3 Example manoeuvring 4 See also 5 Further reading 6 References 7 External linksHistorical overview[edit] Military aviation appeared in World War I
World War I
where aircraft were initially used to spot enemy troop concentrations, field gun positions and movements. Early aerial combat consisted of aviators shooting at one another with hand held weapons.[1] The first recorded aircraft to be shot down by another aircraft, which occurred on October 5, 1914, was a German Aviatik
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Battle
A battle is a combat in warfare between two or more armed forces, or combatants. A war sometimes consists of many battles. Battles generally are well defined in duration, area, and force commitment.[1] A battle with only limited engagement between the forces and without decisive results is sometimes called a skirmish. Wars and military campaigns are guided by strategy, whereas battles take place on a level of planning and execution known as operational mobility.[2] German strategist Carl von Clausewitz
Carl von Clausewitz
stated that "the employment of battles ..
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Cavalry Tactics
For much of history, humans have used some form of cavalry for war and, as a result, cavalry tactics have evolved over time. Tactically, the main advantages of cavalry over infantry troops were greater mobility, a larger impact, and a higher position.Contents1 Predecessors 2 Riding and fighting on horseback2.1 Tactics of light and medium cavalry using bows 2.2 Tactics of heavy cavalry using lances 2.3 Tactics of heavy cavalry using ranged weapons 2.4 Infantry
Infantry
countertactics 2.5 New tactics of light cavalry and mounted infantry3 Cavalry
Cavalry
in modern warfare 4 War
War
elephants 5 Dromedary and camel cavalry 6 References 7 External linksPredecessors[edit] Chariot tactics
Chariot tactics
had been the basis for using the horse in war.[citation needed] The chariot's advantage of speed was outdone by the agility of riding on horseback
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Counterattack
A counterattack is a tactic employed in response to an attack, with the term originating in "war games".[1] The general objective is to negate or thwart the advantage gained by the enemy during attack, while the specific objectives typically seek to regain lost ground or destroy the attacking enemy (this may take the form of an opposing sports team or military units).[1][2][3] A saying, attributed to Napoleon
Napoleon
Bonaparte illustrate the tactical importance of the counterattack : "the greatest danger occurs at the moment of victory". In the same spirit, in his Battle Studies, Ardant du Pic noticed that "he, general or mere captain, who employs every one in the storming of a position can be sure of seeing it retaken by an organised counter-attack of four men and a corporal".[4] A counterattack is a military tactic that occurs when one side successfully defends off the enemy’s attack and begins to push the enemy back with an attack of its own
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Chemical Warfare
Chemical warfare
Chemical warfare
(CW) involves using the toxic properties of chemical substances as weapons. This type of warfare is distinct from nuclear warfare and biological warfare, which together make up NBC, the military acronym for nuclear, biological, and chemical (warfare or weapons), all of which are considered "weapons of mass destruction" (WMDs). None of these fall under the term conventional weapons which are primarily effective due to their destructive potential. With proper protective equipment, training, and decontamination measures, the primary effects of chemical weapons can be overcome. Many nations possess vast stockpiles of weaponized agents in preparation for wartime use
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Counter-insurgency
A counter-insurgency or counterinsurgency[1] (COIN) can be defined as "comprehensive civilian and military efforts taken to simultaneously defeat and contain insurgency and address its root causes".[2] An insurgency is a rebellion against a constituted authority when those taking part in the rebellion are not recognized as belligerents.[3] It isthe organized use of subversion and violence to seize, nullify or challenge political control of a region. As such, it is primarily a political struggle, in which both sides use armed force to create space for their political, economic and influence activities to be effective.[2] Counter-insurgency
Counter-insurgency
campaigns of duly-elected or politically recognized governments take place during war, occupation by a foreign military or police force, and when internal conflicts that involve subversion and armed rebellion occur
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Cover (military)
In military combat, the concept of cover refers to anything which is capable of physically protecting an individual from enemy fire. This differentiates it from the similar concept of concealment, in that an object or area of concealment only affords the benefit of stealth, not actual protection from small arms fire or artillery fragments. An example of "cover vs. concealment" would be sandbags vs. tall grass. Cover may be a naturally occurring feature, such as a rock or a tree stump, or it may be a constructed feature, such as a foxhole or a trench. Uniform[edit] In some military services (especially in the United States), a uniform's hat is sometimes referred to officially as a cover, as in "Hey soldier, remove your cover!" or "You're not in uniform without your cover." It is a convention in the U.S
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