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Derwent Water
Derwentwater
Derwentwater
(or Derwent Water) is one of the principal bodies of water in the Lake District
Lake District
National Park in north west England. It lies wholly within the Borough of Allerdale, in the county of Cumbria. The lake occupies part of Borrowdale
Borrowdale
and lies immediately south of the town of Keswick. It is both fed and drained by the River Derwent. It measures approximately 3 miles (4.8 km) long by 1 mile (1.6 km) wide and is some 72 feet (22 m) deep. There are several islands within the lake, one of which is inhabited. Derwent Island House, an 18th-century residence, is a tenanted National Trust property open to the public on five days each year.Derwent Water on a 1925 Ordnance Survey map Derwentwater
Derwentwater
is a place of considerable scenic value
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Derwent Reservoir (Derbyshire)
Derwent Reservoir
Reservoir
is the middle of three reservoirs in the Upper Derwent Valley in the northeast of Derbyshire, England. It lies approximately 10 miles (16 km) from Glossop
Glossop
and 10 miles (16 km) from Sheffield. The River Derwent flows first through Howden Reservoir, then Derwent Reservoir
Reservoir
and finally through Ladybower Reservoir. Between them they provide practically all of Derbyshire's water, as well as to a large part of South Yorkshire
South Yorkshire
and as far afield as Nottingham
Nottingham
and Leicester. Derwent Reservoir
Reservoir
is around 1.5 miles (2 km) in length, running broadly north–south, with Howden Dam at the northern end and Derwent Dam at the south. A small island lies near the Howden Dam
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Lake
A lake is an area filled with water, localized in a basin, that is surrounded by land, apart from any river or other outlet that serves to feed or drain the lake.[1] Lakes lie on land and are not part of the ocean, and therefore are distinct from lagoons, and are also larger and deeper than ponds, though there are no official or scientific definitions.[2] Lakes can be contrasted with rivers or streams, which are usually flowing. Most lakes are fed and drained by rivers and streams. Natural lakes are generally found in mountainous areas, rift zones, and areas with ongoing glaciation. Other lakes are found in endorheic basins or along the courses of mature rivers. In some parts of the world there are many lakes because of chaotic drainage patterns left over from the last Ice Age
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Environment Agency
The Environment Agency
Environment Agency
(EA) is a non-departmental public body, established in 1995 and sponsored by the United Kingdom government's Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
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Bonobo (musician)
Simon Green (born 30 March 1976), known by his stage name Bonobo, is a British musician, producer and DJ based in Los Angeles.[1] He initially debuted with a trip-hop aesthetic, and has since explored more upbeat approaches while experimenting with jazz and world music. His electronic sound incorporates the use of organic instrumentation, which would be recreated by a full band during his live performances. Green's work has given him a cult following,[2] and has been featured in advertisements, interludes and soundtracks
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Black Sands
Black Sands is the fourth studio album by English DJ Bonobo. It was released on 29 March 2010. The cover features a photograph taken of Derwentwater, in northern England. The tower in the background is located in Castlerigg (54°35′29.95″N 3°7′3.43″W / 54.5916528°N 3.1176194°W / 54.5916528; -3.1176194Coordinates: 54°35′29.95″N 3°7′3.43″W / 54.5916528°N 3.1176194°W / 54.5916528; -3.1176194). As of November 2016 it was certified silver by British Phonographic Industry for 60,000 sold units in UK
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Robin Pecknold
Robin Noel Pecknold (born March 31, 1986) is an American singer, songwriter and guitarist. He is best known as the principal songwriter and vocalist for the indie folk band Fleet Foxes,[1] with whom he has recorded three studio albums, with the latest, Crack-Up, released on June 16, 2017.Contents1 Biography 2 Instruments 3 Personal life 4 Discography4.1 With Fleet Foxes 4.2 As White Antelope 4.3 As Robin Pecknold5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit] Robin Pecknold
Robin Pecknold
was born in Seattle
Seattle
in 1986. He is said to have written his first song at the age of 14. The song is called "Sarah Jane" and tells the story of a runaway who turns to prostitution.[2][3] Pecknold released the song along with six others as a demo CD called St. Vincent Street around his hometown as Robin Noel Vaas
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Lochmaben
Lochmaben
Lochmaben
(Gaelic: Loch Mhabain) is a small town and civil parish in Scotland, and site of a once-important castle. It lies four miles west of Lockerbie, in Dumfries
Dumfries
and Galloway.Contents1 History1.1 Early inhabitants 1.2 Lords of Annandale 1.3 Castles and battles 1.4 Town2 Healthcare 3 Education 4 Recreation 5 Business 6 Notable people 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] Early inhabitants[edit] The name Loch Mhabain is possibly a corruption of Loch Mhaol Bheinn ("Lake on the bare mountain"), or may mean "Loch of Mabon", an ancient Brythonic god, as the Roman name of the area was Locus Maponi, according to the Ravenna Cosmography. It has been inhabited since earliest times due to its strategic position on the routes from England
England
to Scotland
Scotland
and Ireland, to the small lochs surrounding it and to the relatively fertile soil in the area
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Earl Of Derwentwater
Earl of Derwentwater
Earl of Derwentwater
(pronounced "Darwentwater") was a title in the Peerage of England. It was created in 1688 for Sir Francis Radclyffe, 3rd Baronet. He was made Baron Tyndale, of Tyndale in the County of Northumberland, and Viscount Radclyffe and Langley at the same time, also in the Peerage of England. He was succeeded by his son, the second Earl, who married Lady Mary Tudor, daughter of Charles II by his mistress Moll Davis. Their eldest son, the third Earl, was a prominent Jacobite. In 1716, he was convicted of high treason, attainted and executed on Tower Hill in London. Despite having been stripped of his titles through the attainder, his only son John, titular 4th Earl of Derwentwater, continued to use them. On John's early death in 1731, they were claimed by his uncle, Charles Radclyffe, titular 5th Earl
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Lodore Falls
Lodore Falls is a waterfall in Cumbria, England, close to Derwentwater and downstream from Watendlath. The falls are located on the beck that flows from Watendlath Tarn, and tumble more than 100 feet (30 m) over a steep cascade into the Borrowdale Valley.[1] Although it is spectacular in the rainy season, it can dry to a trickle in the summer.[2] One of the earliest recorded visits to the 'Lodoar Falls' was by William Sawrey Gilpin in 1772 and he describes them as follows - "The stream falls through a chasm between two towering perpendicular rocks. The intermediate part, broken into large fragments, forms the rough bed of the cascade. Some of these fragments stretching out in shelves, hold a depth of soil sufficient for large trees
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National Trust For Places Of Historic Interest Or Natural Beauty
The National Trust, formally the National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty, is a conservation organisation in England, Wales
Wales
and Northern Ireland, and the largest membership organisation in the United Kingdom.[citation needed] The trust describes itself as "a charity that works to preserve and protect historic places and spaces—for ever, for everyone".[2] The trust was founded in 1895 and given statutory powers, starting with the National Trust Act 1907. Historically, the trust tended to focus on English country houses, which still make up the largest part of its holdings, but it also protects historic landscapes such as in the Lake District, historic urban properties, and nature reserves. In Scotland, there is an independent National Trust for Scotland
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Common Brittonic
Common Brittonic
Common Brittonic
was an ancient Celtic language spoken in Britain. It is also variously known as Old Brittonic, British, and Common or Old Brythonic
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River Derwent, Cumbria
The Derwent is a river in the county of Cumbria
Cumbria
in the north of England; it rises in the Lake District
Lake District
and flows northwards through two of its principal lakes, before turning sharply westward to enter the Irish Sea
Irish Sea
at Workington
Workington
The name Derwent is shared with three other English rivers and is thought to be derived from a Celtic word for "oak trees"[1] ( an alternative is dour water and (g)-went white / pure ).[2] The river rises at Sprinkling Tarn underneath Scafell Pike
Scafell Pike
and flows in a northerly direction through the valley of Borrowdale, before entering Derwentwater, which it exits to the north just outside Keswick and is joined by the waters of the River
River
Greta
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Coastline Paradox
The coastline paradox is the counterintuitive observation that the coastline of a landmass does not have a well-defined length. This results from the fractal-like properties of coastlines, i.e. the fact that a coastline typically has a fractal dimension (which in fact makes the notion of length inapplicable). The first recorded observation of this phenomenon was by Lewis Fry Richardson[1] and it was expanded by Benoit Mandelbrot.[2] The measured length of the coastline depends on the method used to measure it. Since a landmass has features at all scales, from hundreds of kilometers in size to tiny fractions of a millimeter and below, there is no obvious size of the smallest feature that should be measured around, and hence no single well-defined perimeter to the landmass
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