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Dermatome (anatomy)
A dermatome is an area of skin that is mainly supplied by a single spinal nerve.[1] There are 8 cervical nerves (C1 being an exception with no dermatome), 12 thoracic nerves, 5 lumbar nerves and 5 sacral nerves. Each of these nerves relays sensation (including pain) from a particular region of skin to the brain. A dermatome also refers to the part of an embryonic somite. Along the thorax and abdomen the dermatomes are like a stack of discs forming a human, each supplied by a different spinal nerve. Along the arms and the legs, the pattern is different: the dermatomes run longitudinally along the limbs
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Thoracic Spinal Nerve 8
The thoracic spinal nerve 8 (T8) is a spinal nerve of the thoracic segment.[1] It originates from the spinal column from below the thoracic vertebra 8 (T8). References[edit]^ American Medical Association Nervous System -- Groups of Nervesv t eSpinal nervesCervicalC1 C2 C3 C4 C5 C6 C7 C8anteriorCervical plexus Brachial plexusposteriorPosterior branches of cervical nerves Suboccipital – C1 Greater occipital – C2 Third occipital – C3ThoracicT1 T2 T3 T4 T5 T6 T7 T8 T9 T10 T11 T12anteriorIntercostal Intercostobrachial – T2 Thoraco-abdominal nerves
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Thoracic Spinal Nerve 1
The thoracic spinal nerve 1 (T1) is a spinal nerve of the thoracic segment.[1] It originates from the spinal column from below the thoracic vertebra 1 (T1). Additional Images[edit]Thoracic spinal nerve 1References[edit]^ American Medical Association Nervous System -- Groups of Nerves Archived December 20, 2007, at the Wayback Machine.v t eSpinal nervesCervicalC1 C2 C3 C4 C5 C6 C7 C8anteriorCervical plexus Brachial plexusposteriorPosterior branches of cervical nerves Suboccipital – C1 Greater occipital – C2 Third occipital – C3ThoracicT1 T2 T3 T4 T5 T6 T7 T8 T9 T10 T11 T12anteriorIntercostal Intercostobrachial – T2 Thoraco-abdominal nerves
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Cervical Spinal Nerve 5
The cervical spinal nerve 5 (C5) is a spinal nerve of the cervical segment.[1] It originates from the spinal column from above the cervical vertebra 5 (C5)
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Antecubital Fossa
The cubital fossa or elbow pit is the triangular area on the anterior view of the elbow of a human or other hominid animal
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Cervical Spinal Nerve 6
The cervical spinal nerve 6 (C6) is a spinal nerve of the cervical segment.[1] It originates from the spinal column from above the cervical vertebra 6 (C6). The C6 nerve root shares a common branch from C5, and has a role in innervating many muscles of the rotator cuff and distal arm,[2] including:Subclavius Supraspinatus Infraspinatus Biceps Brachii Brachialis Deltoid Teres Minor Brachioradialis Serratus Anterior Subscapularis Pectoralis Major Coracobrachialis Teres Major Supinator Extensor Carpi Radialis Brevis Extensor Carpi Radialis Longus Latissimus DorsiDamage to the C6 motor neuron, by way of impingement, ischemia, trauma, or degeneration of nerve tissue, can cause denervation of one or more of the associated muscles
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Proximal Phalanges
The phalanges /fəˈlændʒiːz/ (singular: phalanx /ˈfælæŋks/) are digital bones in the hands and feet of most vertebrates. In primates, the thumbs and big toes have two phalanges while the other digits have three phalanges. The phalanges are classed as long bones.Contents1 Structure1.1 Bone
Bone
anatomy1.1.1 Distal phalanx1.2 Development2 Function 3 History of phalanges3.1 In animals3.1.1 Primates 3.1.2 Other mammals4 Additional images 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksStructure[edit]Bones of footThe phalanges are the bones that make up the fingers of the hand and the toes of the foot. There are 56 phalanges in the human body, with fourteen on each hand and foot. Three phalanges are present on each finger and toe, with the exception of the thumb and large toe, which possess only two
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Thumb
The thumb is the first digit of the hand. When a person is standing in the medical anatomical position (where the palm is facing to the front), the thumb is the outermost digit
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Cervical Spinal Nerve 7
The cervical spinal nerve 7 (C7) is a spinal nerve of the cervical segment.[1] It originates from the spinal column from above the cervical vertebra 7 (C7). It runs through the interspace between the C6 and C7 vertebrae. Additional Images[edit]Cervical spinal nerve 7References[edit]^ American Medical Association Nervous System -- Groups of Nervesv t eSpinal nervesCervicalC1 C2 C3 C4 C5 C6 C7 C8anteriorCervical plexus Brachial plexusposteriorPosterior branches of cervical nerves Suboccipital – C1 Greater occipital – C2 Third occipital – C3ThoracicT1 T2 T3 T4 T5 T6 T7 T8 T9 T10 T11 T12anteriorIntercostal Intercostobrachial – T2 Thoraco-abdominal nerves
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Middle Finger
The middle finger, long finger or tall finger is the third digit of the human hand, located between the index finger and the ring finger. It is usually the longest finger. In anatomy, it is also called the third finger, digitus medius, digitus tertius or digitus III. In Western countries, extending the middle finger (either by itself, or along with the index finger in the United Kingdom: see V sign) is an offensive and obscene gesture, widely recognized as a form of insult (colloquially known as "flipping the bird",[1] "flipping someone off", or simply "giving the finger"). The middle finger is often used for finger snapping together with the thumb. References[edit]^ Jason Joseph, Rick Joseph (2007). 101 Ways to Flip the Bird. Broadway Books
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Little Finger
The little finger or pinky finger, also known as the fifth digit or just pinky, is the most ulnar and usually smallest finger of the human hand, opposite the thumb, and next to the ring finger.Contents1 Etymology 2 Muscles 3 Cultural significance3.1 Gestures 3.2 Rings4 References 5 See alsoEtymology[edit] The word "pinky" is derived from the Dutch word pink, meaning "little finger"
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Medial Epicondyle Of The Humerus
The medial epicondyle of the humerus is an epicondyle of the humerus bone of the upper arm in humans. It is larger and more prominent than the lateral epicondyle and is directed slightly more posteriorly in the anatomical position. In birds, where the arm is somewhat rotated compared to other tetrapods, it is called the ventral epicondyle of the humerus. In comparative anatomy, the more neutral term entepicondyle is used. The medial epicondyle gives attachment to the ulnar collateral ligament of elbow joint, to the pronator teres, and to a common tendon of origin (the common flexor tendon) of some of the flexor muscles of the forearm: the flexor carpi radialis, the flexor carpi ulnaris, the flexor digitorum superficialis, and the palmaris longus. The ulnar nerve runs in a groove on the back of this epicondyle. The medial epicondyle protects the ulnar nerve. The ulnar nerve is vulnerable because it passes close to the surface along the back of the bone
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Supraclavicular Fossa
The Supraclavicular fossa
Supraclavicular fossa
is an indentation (fossa) immediately above the clavicle. In terminologia anatomica, it is divided into fossa supraclavicularis major and fossa supraclavicularis minor Fullness in the supraclavicular fossa can be a sign of upper extremity deep venous thrombosis. Additional Images[edit] Dissection
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Thoracic Spinal Nerve 2
The thoracic spinal nerve 2 (T2) is a spinal nerve of the thoracic segment.[1] It originates from the spinal column from below the thoracic vertebra 2 (T2). References[edit]^ American Medical Association Nervous System -- Groups of Nervesv t eSpinal nervesCervicalC1 C2 C3 C4 C5 C6 C7 C8anteriorCervical plexus Brachial plexusposteriorPosterior branches of cervical nerves Suboccipital – C1 Greater occipital – C2 Third occipital – C3ThoracicT1 T2 T3 T4 T5 T6 T7 T8 T9 T10 T11 T12anteriorIntercostal Intercostobrachial – T2 Thoraco-abdominal nerves
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Axilla
The axilla (also, armpit, underarm or oxter) is the area on the human body directly under the joint where the arm connects to the shoulder. It also provides the under-arm sweat gland. In humans, the formation of body odor happens mostly in the axillary region.[1] These odorant substances serve as pheromones which play a role related to mating
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