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Der Von Kürenberg
Der von Kürenberg
Der von Kürenberg
or Der Kürenberger (fl. mid-12th century) was a Middle High German
Middle High German
poet and one of the earliest Minnesänger. Fifteen strophes of his songs are preserved in the Codex Manesse
Codex Manesse
and the Budapest Fragment.Contents1 Life 2 Work2.1 Manuscripts 2.2 Form 2.3 Content3 Example Text 4 Notes 5 Editions 6 Further reading 7 External linksLife[edit] Since his given name remains unknown ("Der" is not a name but a demonstrative pronoun), it is impossible to identify him in historical records. His social status also remains uncertain and the place name Kürenberg (literally "Mill Hill") is not uncommon. Although he is placed among the barons ("Freiherren") in the hierarchical ordering of the Manesse Codex, the only known house of this status and name is documented in the Breisgau
Breisgau
in the 11th Century
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Nibelungenlied
The Nibelungenlied, translated as The Song of the Nibelungs, is an epic poem in Middle High German. The story tells of dragon-slayer Siegfried at the court of the Burgundians, how he was murdered, and of his wife Kriemhild's revenge. The Nibelungenlied
Nibelungenlied
is based on pre-Christian Germanic heroic motifs (the "Nibelungensaga"), which include oral traditions and reports based on historic events and individuals of the 5th and 6th centuries. Old Norse
Old Norse
parallels of the legend survive in the Völsunga saga, the Prose Edda, the Poetic Edda, the Legend of Norna-Gest, and the Þiðrekssaga. In 2009, the three main manuscripts of the Nibelungenlied
Nibelungenlied
were inscribed in UNESCO's Memory of the World Register
Memory of the World Register
in recognition of their historical significance.[1]First page from Manuscript
Manuscript
C (ca
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Linz
Linz
Linz
(/lɪnts/; German pronunciation: [ˈlɪnt͡s]; Czech: Linec) is the third-largest city of Austria
Austria
and capital of the state of Upper Austria
Austria
(German: Oberösterreich). It is in the north centre of Austria, approximately 30 kilometres (19 miles) south of the Czech border, on both sides of the River Danube. The population of the city is 200,839, and that of the Greater Linz
Linz
conurbation is about 271,000. In 2009 Linz, together with the Lithuanian capital Vilnius, was chosen as the European Capital of Culture. Since 1 December 2014 Linz
Linz
is a member of the UNESCO
UNESCO
Creative Cities (UCCN) network as a City of Media Arts
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Dietmar Von Eist
Dietmar von Aist (c. 1115 – c. 1171) was a Minnesinger from a baronial family in the Duchy of Austria, whose work is representative of the lyric poetry in the Danube region.Dietmar von Aste: Alternative names used in the early literature for Dietmar von Aist are Dietmar von Aste or von Ast, as depicted above in the "Konstanz-Weingartner Liederhandschrift" (written around 1310-1320 in the monastery St. Martin at Weingarten near Ravensburg). The unicorn served as heraldic animal for Dietmar.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 Texts 4 Secondary literature 5 External linksLife[edit] One Dietmar von Aist is mentioned by name from about 1139 onwards in contemporary records from Salzburg, Regensburg and Vienna. The surname probably refers to the Aist River, a left tributary of the Danube below the confluence with the Enns
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Stanza
In poetry, a stanza (/ˈstænzə/; from Italian stanza [ˈstantsa], "room") is a grouped set of lines within a poem, usually set off from other stanzas by a blank line or indentation.[1] Stanzas can have regular rhyme and metrical schemes, though stanzas are not strictly required to have either. There are many unique forms of stanzas. Some stanzaic forms are simple, such as four-line quatrains. Other forms are more complex, such as the Spenserian stanza. Fixed verse poems, such as sestinas, can be defined by the number and form of their stanzas. The term stanza is similar to strophe, though strophe sometimes refers to irregular set of lines, as opposed to regular, rhymed stanzas.[2] The stanza in poetry is analogous with the paragraph that is seen in prose; related thoughts are grouped into units.[3] In music, groups of lines are typically referred to as verses
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Miniature (illuminated Manuscript)
The word miniature, derived from the Latin
Latin
minium, red lead, is a small illustration used to decorate an ancient or medieval illuminated manuscript; the simple illustrations of the early codices having been miniated or delineated with that pigment. The generally small scale of the medieval pictures has led secondly to an etymological confusion of the term with minuteness and to its application to small paintings, especially portrait miniatures,[1] which did however grow from the same tradition and at least initially used similar techniques. Apart from the Western and Byzantine traditions, there is another group of Asian traditions, which is generally more illustrative in nature, and from origins in manuscript book decoration also developed into single-sheet small paintings to be kept in albums, which are also called miniatures, as the Western equivalents in watercolor and other mediums are not
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German National Library
The German National Library
German National Library
(German: Deutsche Nationalbibliothek or DNB) is the central archival library and national bibliographic centre for the Federal Republic of Germany. Its task is to collect, permanently archive, comprehensively document and record bibliographically all German and German-language
German-language
publications since 1913, foreign publications about Germany, translations of German works, and the works of German-speaking emigrants published abroad between 1933 and 1945, and to make them available to the public.[2] The German National Library
German National Library
maintains co-operative external relations on a national and international level. For example, it is the leading partner in developing and maintaining bibliographic rules and standards in Germany
Germany
and plays a significant role in the development of international library standards
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Middle High German
Middle High German
High German
(abbreviated MHG, German: Mittelhochdeutsch, abbr. Mhd.) is the term for the form of German spoken in the High Middle Ages. It is conventionally dated between 1050 and 1350, developing from Old High German
Old High German
and into Early New High German. High German
High German
is defined as those varieties of German which were affected by the Second Sound Shift; the Middle Low German
Middle Low German
and Middle Dutch languages spoken to the North and North West, which did not participate in this sound change, are not part of MHG. While there is no standard MHG, the prestige of the Hohenstaufen
Hohenstaufen
court gave rise in the late 12th century to a supra-regional literary language (mittelhochdeutsche Dichtersprache) based on Swabian, an Alemannic dialect
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Melk
Melk
Melk
(older spelling: Mölk) is a city of Austria, in the federal state of Lower Austria, next to the Wachau
Wachau
valley along the Danube. Melk
Melk
has a population of 5,257 (as of 2012). It is best known as the site of a massive baroque Benedictine
Benedictine
monastery named Melk
Melk
Abbey. The town is first mentioned as Medilica in 831 in a donation of Louis the German; the name is from a Slavic word for 'border.'[2] The area around Melk
Melk
was given to Margrave
Margrave
Leopold I in the year 976 to serve as a buffer between the Magyars
Magyars
(called "Turks" in that time's sources) to east and Bavaria
Bavaria
to the west. In 996 mention was first made of an area known as Ostarrîchi, which is the origin of the word Österreich (German for Austria)
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Neue Deutsche Biographie
Neue Deutsche Biographie
Neue Deutsche Biographie
(NDB; literally New German Biography) is a biographical reference work. It is the successor to the Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie (ADB, Universal German Biography). The 26 volumes published thus far cover more than 22,500 individuals and families who lived in the German language area. NDB is published in German by the Historical Commission at the Bavarian Academy of Sciences and Humanities
Bavarian Academy of Sciences and Humanities
and printed by Duncker & Humblot in Berlin
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Danube
The Danube
Danube
or Donau (/ˈdænjuːb/ DAN-yoob, known by various names in other languages) is Europe's second longest river, after the Volga. It is located in Central and Eastern Europe. The Danube
Danube
was once a long-standing frontier of the Roman Empire, and today flows through 10 countries, more than any other river in the world. Originating in Germany, the Danube
Danube
flows southeast for 2,860 km (1,780 mi), passing through or touching the border of Austria, Slovakia, Hungary, Croatia, Serbia, Romania, Bulgaria, Moldova
Moldova
and Ukraine
Ukraine
before emptying into the Black Sea. Its drainage basin extends into nine more countries
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Dienstmann
A Dienstmann
Dienstmann
(plural: Dienstleute or, in Austria, Dienstmänner) was a medieval retainer or vassal and, later, a hired man, in German-speaking countries, particularly in Austria
Austria
until the first half of the 20th century.Contents1 Usage 2 In fiction 3 References 4 Literature 5 External linksUsage[edit] The term Dienstmann
Dienstmann
first surfaced in the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
as a Germanicization of the Latin word ministerialis,[1] for men, who served at a court and, in the course of time, were raised to be armigers with a social status similar to that of free knights (Ritter).[2] However the term Dienstmann
Dienstmann
could also refer to men who were obliged to pay duties or render socage to their liege lords a socager, or socman
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Breisgau
Breisgau
Breisgau
is an area in southwest Germany
Germany
between the Rhine
Rhine
River and the foothills of the Black Forest. Part of the state of Baden-Württemberg, it centers on the city of Freiburg
Freiburg
im Breisgau. The district Breisgau-Hochschwarzwald, which partly consists of the Breisgau, is named after the Black Forest
Black Forest
area
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Freiherr
Freiherr
Freiherr
([ˈfʀaɪ̯ˌhɛʁ]; male, abbreviated as Frhr.), Freifrau ([ˈfʀaɪ̯ˌfʀaʊ̯]; his wife, abbreviated as Frfr., literally "free lord" or "free lady")[1] and Freiin ([ˈfʀaɪ̯ɪn]; his unmarried daughters and maiden aunts) are designations used as titles of nobility in the German-speaking areas of the Holy Roman Empire, and in its various successor states, including Austria, Prussia, Bavaria, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, etc. Traditionally it denotes the third-lowest titled rank within the nobility, above Ritter
Ritter
(knight) and Edler
Edler
(nobility without a specific title) and below Graf
Graf
(count, earl) and Herzog
Herzog
(duke). The title superseded the earlier medieval form, Edelherr. It corresponds to baron in rank.[2]Contents1 Freiherr
Freiherr
in the feudal system 2 Freiherr
Freiherr
vs
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Demonstrative Pronoun
Demonstratives (abbreviated DEM) are words, such as this and that, used to indicate which entities are being referred to and to distinguish those entities from others. They are typically deictic, their meaning depending on a particular frame of its reference. Demonstratives are often used in spatial deixis (using the context of the physical surroundings of the speaker and sometimes the listener), but also in intra-discourse reference - so called "discourse deixis" (including abstract concepts) or anaphora, where the meaning is dependent on something other than the relative physical location of the speaker, for example whether something is currently being said or was said earlier. Demonstrative constructions include demonstrative adjectives or demonstrative determiners, which qualify nouns (as in Put that coat on); and demonstrative pronouns, which stand independently (as in Put that on)
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