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Department Of The Media
Department may refer to:Departmentalization, division of a larger organization into parts with specific responsibility Government and military[edit] Department (country subdivision), a geographical and administrative division within a country Departments of Colombia, a grouping of municipalities Departments of France, administrative divisions three levels below the national government Departments of Honduras Departments of Peru, name given to the subdivisions of Peru until 2002 Department (United States Army), corps areas of the U.S
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Department Of The Environment, Aborigines And The Arts
Department may refer to:Departmentalization, division of a larger organization into parts with specific responsibilityGovernment and military[edit] Department (country subdivision), a geographical and administrative division within a countryDepartments of Colombia, a grouping of municipalities Departments of France, administrative divisions three levels below the national government Departments of Honduras Departments of Peru, name given to the subdivisions of Peru until 2002 Department (United States Army), corps areas of the U.S
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Whitlam Government
The Whitlam Government
Whitlam Government
was the federal executive government of Australia led by Prime Minister Gough Whitlam. It was made up of members of the Australian Labor Party. The government commenced when it defeated the McMahon Government
McMahon Government
in the 1972 federal election after a record 23 years of Coalition government. It concluded in historic circumstances, when it was dismissed by Governor-General Sir John Kerr as a result of the 1975 constitutional crisis and was succeeded by the Fraser Government. The Whitlam Government
Whitlam Government
remains the only federal government in Australian history to be dismissed by either a monarch or viceregal representative. The Whitlam Government, while highly controversial during its short tenure, is credited with the implementation of major reforms
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Ken Inglis
Kenneth Stanley Inglis, AO, FASSA (7 October 1929 – 1 December 2017) was an Australian historian. Inglis completed his Master's degree at the University of Melbourne and his doctorate at the University of Oxford. In 1956 he was appointed as a lecturer to the University of Adelaide
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Bruce Juddery
Bruce Juddery (25 September 1941 – 16 January 2003) was an Australian journalist
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Talbot Duckmanton
Sir Talbot Sydney
Sydney
Duckmanton CBE (25 October 1921 – 12 June 1995) was an Australian broadcaster and radio and television administrator. As General Manager of the Australian Broadcasting Commission he oversaw the advent of colour television, ABC Classic FM and Triple J.[1]Contents1 Early life 2 Broadcasting career 3 Other offices 4 ABC legacy 5 Family life 6 Honours 7 Bibliography 8 ReferencesEarly life[edit] The son of Sidney James Duckmanton and Rita Margaret Hutchins,[2] Duckmanton was born in South Yarra, Melbourne.[3] He was educated at Newington College
Newington College
in Sydney
Sydney
1934–1938.[4] Broadcasting career[edit] He began his career as a cadet announcer at the ABC in Brisbane
Brisbane
in 1939 and had a wide ranging career working as a news announcer and sporting broadcaster
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Gough Whitlam
Edward Gough Whitlam
Gough Whitlam
AC QC (/ˈɡɒf ˈwɪtləm/ 11 July 1916 – 21 October 2014) was the 21st Prime Minister of Australia, serving from 1972 to 1975. The Leader of the Labor Party from 1967 to 1977, Whitlam led his party to power for the first time in 23 years at the 1972 election. He won the 1974 election before being controversially dismissed by the Governor-General of Australia, Sir John Kerr, at the climax of the 1975 Australian constitutional crisis. Whitlam remains the only Australian prime minister to have his commission terminated in that manner. Whitlam served as an air navigator in the Royal Australian Air Force for four years during World War II, and worked as a barrister following the war. He was first elected to Parliament in 1952, representing Werriwa in the House of Representatives
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Caretaker Government
A caretaker government is a government that rules on a temporary basis, due to the loss of election or a pending transition of power.Contents1 Definition 2 Caretaker governments associated with elections 3 Caretaker governments associated with wars or new regimes 4 Caretakers4.1 List of caretaker individuals4.1.1 Heads of state 4.1.2 Heads of government5 See also 6 ReferencesDefinition[edit] Caretaker governments may be put in place when a government in a parliamentary system is defeated in a motion of no confidence, or in the case when the house to which the government is responsible is dissolved, to be in place for an interim period until an election is held and a new government is formed
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Malcolm Fraser
John Malcolm Fraser
Malcolm Fraser
AC CH GCL (/ˈfreɪzər/; 21 May 1930 – 20 March 2015) was an Australian politician who was the 22nd Prime Minister of Australia
Australia
and the Leader of the Liberal Party from 1975 to 1983.[1] Elected to the Australian Parliament
Australian Parliament
seat of Wannon in 1955 at the age of 25, Fraser was appointed to the Cabinet in 1966. After rising to become Minister for Defence in 1969, he was regarded as a contender for the leadership of the Liberal Party following their defeat in 1972, but he lost that contest to Billy Snedden
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List Of Australian Leaders Of The Opposition
Below is a list of Australian Leaders of the Opposition.[1] The Leader of the Opposition in Australian Federal Politics is a Member of Parliament in the House of Representatives. The position is held by the leader of the party not in government that has the most seats in the House. When in parliament, the Leader of the Opposition sits on the left-hand side of the centre table, in front of the Opposition and opposite the Prime Minister. The Opposition Leader is elected by his or her party according to its rules. A new Opposition Leader may be elected when the incumbent dies, resigns, or is challenged for the leadership. The Commonwealth of Australia
Australia
is a constitutional monarchy with a parliamentary system and is based on the Westminster model. The term Opposition has a specific meaning in the parliamentary sense
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Australian Public Service
The Australian Public Service
Australian Public Service
(APS) is the federal civil service of the Commonwealth of Australia
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1975 Australian Constitutional Crisis
The 1975 Australian constitutional crisis, also known simply as the Dismissal, has been described as the greatest political and constitutional crisis in Australian history. It culminated on 11 November 1975 with the dismissal from office of the Prime Minister, Gough Whitlam
Gough Whitlam
of the Australian Labor Party
Australian Labor Party
(ALP), by Governor-General Sir John Kerr, who then commissioned the Leader of the Opposition, Malcolm Fraser
Malcolm Fraser
of the Liberal Party, as caretaker Prime Minister. Whitlam's Labor government had been elected in 1972 with a small majority in the House of Representatives, but with the Opposition controlling the Senate. Another election in 1974 resulted in little change. While the Whitlam Government
Whitlam Government
introduced many new policies and programs, it was also rocked by scandals and political miscalculations
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Government Department
A ministry is a governmental organisation, headed by a minister, that is meant to manage a specific sector of public administration.[1] Ministries have a bureaucratic structure.[1] Different states have different numbers and names of ministries,[1] but the Brockhaus and Efron Encyclopedic Dictionary
Brockhaus and Efron Encyclopedic Dictionary
notes that all states have (often under different names) a Ministry of Interior, a Ministry of Foreign Affairs, a
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Department Of The Interior (1939–1972)
The Department of the Interior was an Australian government department that existed between April 1939 and December 1972
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Moss Cass
Moses Henry "Moss" Cass (born 18 February 1927) is a former member of the Australian House of Representatives. Born in Narrogin, Western Australia, Cass was educated in state schools before graduating in Medicine from the University of Sydney
University of Sydney
and was employed as a Fellow at the Royal Children's Hospital in Melbourne
Melbourne
and as Director of the Melbourne-based Trade Union Clinic and Research Centre. His union activities led to his pre-selection as the Labor candidate for the federal seat of Maribyrnong, which he won from the Liberals in 1969. Cass became part of the first national Labor government in 23 years when Gough Whitlam
Gough Whitlam
led the ALP to power in the 1972 election. Appointed Minister for the Environment and Conservation, in 1975 Cass led parliamentarians and ALP branch members in expressing concerns about the effects of uranium mining
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