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Denys Finch Hatton
Denys George Finch Hatton (24 April 1887 – 14 May 1931) was an English aristocratic big-game hunter and the lover of Baroness Karen Blixen (also known by her pen name as Isak Dinesen), a Danish noblewoman who wrote about him in her autobiographical book Out of Africa, first published in 1937. In the book, his name is hyphenated: "Finch-Hatton".Contents1 Early life 2 Africa2.1 Relationship with Blixen 2.2 Death3 Fictional portrayals 4 See also 5 Footnotes 6 ReferencesEarly life[edit] Born in Kensington,[1] Finch Hatton was the second son and third child of Henry Finch-Hatton, 13th Earl of Winchilsea, by his wife, the former Anne "Nan" Codrington, daughter of Admiral of the Fleet Sir Henry Codrington. He was educated at Eton and Brasenose College, Oxford
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The Honourable
The prefix The Honourable or The Honorable (abbreviated to The Hon., Hon. or formerly The Hon'ble—the latter term is still used in South Asia) is a style that is used before the names of certain classes of people. It is considered to be an honorific styling, and it is only used for living people. American protocol expert Robert Hickey says, "The courtesy title The Honorable is used when addressing or listing the name of a living person. When the name of a deceased person is listed it is just (Full Name) + Office Held."[1] The 2016 Bloomsbury guide to titles and forms of address states that the title 'honourable' in English speaking countries is "held for life or during tenure of office."[2] The New York Times Manual of Style and Usage by Allan M. Siegal (1999), p
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Armistice With Germany
An armistice is a formal agreement of warring parties to stop fighting. It is not necessarily the end of a war, since it may constitute only a cessation of hostilities while an attempt is made to negotiate a lasting peace. It is derived from the Latin
Latin
arma, meaning "arms" (as in weapons) and -stitium, meaning "a stopping".[1] The United Nations Security Council
United Nations Security Council
often imposes, or tries to impose, cease-fire resolutions on parties in modern conflicts. Armistices are always negotiated between the parties themselves and are thus generally seen as more binding than non-mandatory UN cease-fire resolutions in modern international law. An armistice is a modus vivendi and is not the same as a peace treaty, which may take months or even years to agree on. The 1953 Korean War Armistice
Armistice
Agreement is a major example of an armistice which has not been followed by a peace treaty
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Hugh Cholmondeley, 3rd Baron Delamere
Hugh Cholmondeley, 3rd Baron Delamere KCMG (28 April 1870 – 13 November 1931), styled The Honourable from birth until 1887, was a British peer. He was one of the first and most influential British settlers in Kenya. Lord Delamere, the son of The 2nd Baron Delamere and his wife, Augusta Emily Seymour, moved to Kenya in 1901 and acquired vast land holdings from the British Crown. Over the years, he became the unofficial 'leader' of the colony's European community
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The Rime Of The Ancient Mariner
The Rime of the Ancient Mariner
The Rime of the Ancient Mariner
(originally The Rime of the Ancyent Marinere) is the longest major poem by the English poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge, written in 1797–98 and published in 1798 in the first edition of Lyrical Ballads. Some modern editions use a revised version printed in 1817 that featured a gloss.[citation needed] Along with other poems in Lyrical Ballads, it is often considered a signal shift to modern poetry and the beginning of British Romantic literature.[citation needed] The Rime of the Ancient Mariner
The Rime of the Ancient Mariner
(1800 edition)Problems playing this file? See media help. The Rime of the Ancient Mariner
The Rime of the Ancient Mariner
relates the experiences of a sailor who has returned from a long sea voyage. The mariner stops a man who is on the way to a wedding ceremony and begins to narrate a story
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Edward VIII
Edward VIII
Edward VIII
(Edward Albert Christian George Andrew Patrick David; 23 June 1894 – 28 May 1972) was King of the United Kingdom
King of the United Kingdom
and the Dominions of the British Empire, and Emperor of India, from 20 January 1936 until his abdication on 11 December the same year. Edward was the eldest son of King George V
George V
and Queen Mary. He was named Prince of Wales
Prince of Wales
on his sixteenth birthday, nine weeks after his father succeeded as king. As a young man, he served in the British Army during the First World War
First World War
and undertook several overseas tours on behalf of his father. Edward became king on his father's death in early 1936. However, he showed impatience with court protocol, and caused concern among politicians by his apparent disregard for established constitutional conventions
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Kensington
Kensington
Kensington
is a district within the Royal Borough of Kensington
Kensington
and Chelsea in West London. The north east is taken up by Kensington Gardens, once private, but today a public park with Italian and Dutch gardens, public buildings such as the Albert Memorial, the Serpentine Gallery and Speke's monument. The district's commercial heart is Kensington
Kensington
High Street. The affluent and densely populated area contains the major museum district of South Kensington, which is home to Imperial College London, the Royal College of Music
Royal College of Music
and the Royal Albert Hall. The area is also home to many of London's European embassies
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Serengeti
The Serengeti
Serengeti
(/ˌsɛrənˈɡɛti/) ecosystem is a geographical region in Africa. It is located mainly in northern Tanzania
Tanzania
and extends into south-western Kenya
Kenya
between 1 and 3 degrees south (latitudes) and between 34 and 36 degrees east (longitudes). It spans approximately 30,000 km2 (12,000 sq mi)
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Samuel Taylor Coleridge
(/ˈkoʊləˌrɪdʒ/; 21 October 1772 – 25 July 1834) was an English poet, literary critic, philosopher and theologian who, with his friend William Wordsworth, was a founder of the Romantic Movement in England and a member of the Lake Poets. He wrote the poems The Rime of the Ancient Mariner
The Rime of the Ancient Mariner
and Kubla Khan, as well as the major prose work Biographia Literaria. His critical work, especially on William Shakespeare, was highly influential, and he helped introduce German idealist philosophy to English-speaking culture. Coleridge coined many familiar words and phrases, including suspension of disbelief
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Egypt
Coordinates: 26°N 30°E / 26°N 30°E / 26; 30Arab Republic
Republic
of Egyptجمهورية مصر العربيةArabic: Jumhūrīyat Miṣr al-ʿArabīyahEgyptian: Gomhoreyet Maṣr El ʿArabeyahFlagCoat of armsAnthem: "Bilady, Bilady, Bilady" "بلادي، بلادي، بلادي" "My country, my country, my country"Capital and largest city Cairo 30°2′N 31°13′E / 30.033°N 31.217°E / 30.033; 31.217Official languages Arabic[a]National language Egyptian ArabicReligion90% Islam 9% Orthodox Christian 1% Other Christian[1]Demonym EgyptianGovernment Unitary semi-presidential republic• PresidentAbdel Fattah el-Sisi• Prime MinisterSherif IsmailLegislature House of RepresentativesEstablishment• Unification of Upper and Lower Egypt[2][3][b]c
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Swedish People
 Sweden       c. 8 million[b][1] Other significant population centers: Swedish minorities Finland c. 280,000 (2011)[2][3] Estonia 300 (2000)[4]Swedish citizens abroad c. 546,000[c][3]Swedish diaspora c
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Anglo–Irish
Anglo-Irish (Irish: Angla-Éireannach) is a term which was more commonly used in the 19th and early 20th centuries to identify a social class in Ireland, whose members are mostly the descendants and successors of the English Protestant Ascendancy.[1] They mostly belong to the Anglican Church of Ireland, which was the established church of Ireland until 1871, or to a lesser extent one of the English dissenting churches, such as the Methodist church, though some were also Catholic. Its members tended to follow English practices in matters of culture, science, law, agriculture and politics but often defined themselves as simply "Irish" or "British", rather than "Anglo-Irish" or "English".[2] Many became eminent as administrators in the British Empire and as senior army and naval officers. The term is not usually applied to Presbyterians in the province of Ulster, whose ancestry is mostly Lowland Scottish, rather than English or Irish, and who are sometimes identified as "Ulster-Scots"
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Bror Von Blixen-Finecke
Baron Bror Fredrik von Blixen-Finecke (25 July 1886 – 4 March 1946) was a Swedish baron, writer, and African big-game hunter.Contents1 Personal Life 2 Big-game hunter
Big-game hunter
in Africa 3 Writing 4 See also 5 ReferencesPersonal Life[edit] Bror Fredrik von Blixen-Finecke and his twin brother Hans Gustaf were born to an aristocratic Swedish family at Näsbyholm Castle, Sweden
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Edward VIII Of The United Kingdom
Edward VIII
Edward VIII
(Edward Albert Christian George Andrew Patrick David; 23 June 1894 – 28 May 1972) was King of the United Kingdom
King of the United Kingdom
and the Dominions of the British Empire, and Emperor of India, from 20 January 1936 until his abdication on 11 December the same year. Edward was the eldest son of King George V
George V
and Queen Mary. He was named Prince of Wales
Prince of Wales
on his sixteenth birthday, nine weeks after his father succeeded as king. As a young man, he served in the British Army during the First World War
First World War
and undertook several overseas tours on behalf of his father. Edward became king on his father's death in early 1936. However, he showed impatience with court protocol, and caused concern among politicians by his apparent disregard for established constitutional conventions
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Mary S. Lovell
Mary Sybilla Lovell is a British writer, daughter of William G. and Mary Catherine (née Wooley) Shelton. She married Clifford C. Lovell on 22 October 1960. They divorced in 1974. She married Geoffrey A. H. Watts on 11 July 1992. She has one child: Graeme R. Lovell. She was an accountant and company director until she began writing in 1980 following a serious riding accident which left her temporarily disabled. She has written biographies of Beryl Markham, Amelia Earhart, Jane Digby, Richard Francis Burton, Amy Elizabeth Thorpe, the Mitford Girls, Bess of Hardwick and The Churchills
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Obelisk
An obelisk (UK: /ˈɒbəlɪsk/; US: /ˈɑːbəlɪsk/, from Ancient Greek: ὀβελίσκος obeliskos;[1][2] diminutive of ὀβελός obelos, "spit, nail, pointed pillar"[3]) is a tall, four-sided, narrow tapering monument which ends in a pyramid-like shape or pyramidion at the top. These were originally called tekhenu by their builders, the Ancient Egyptians. The Greeks who saw them used the Greek term 'obeliskos' to describe them, and this word passed into Latin
Latin
and ultimately English.[4] Ancient obelisks are monolithic; that is, they consist of a single stone
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