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Denversaurus
Denversaurus
Denversaurus
(meaning "Denver lizard") is a genus of herbivorous nodosaurid ankylosaurian dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous (late Maastrichtian) of western North America. Although at one point treated as a junior synonym of Edmontonia
Edmontonia
by some taxonomists, current research indicates that it is a distinct nodosaurid genus.Contents1 Description 2 Discovery and naming2.1 Validity3 Classification 4 ReferencesDescription[edit] In 2010, American paleontologist Gregory S. Paul
Gregory S. Paul
estimated the length of Denversaurus
Denversaurus
at six meters and its weight at three tonnes.[1] American paleontologist Robert T. Bakker
Robert T

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Late Cretaceous
The Late Cretaceous
Cretaceous
(100.5–66 Ma) is the younger of two epochs into which the Cretaceous
Cretaceous
period is divided in the geologic timescale. Rock strata from this epoch form the Upper Cretaceous
Cretaceous
series
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Denver Museum Of Nature And Science
The Denver
Denver
Museum
Museum
of Nature & Science
Science
is a municipal natural history and science museum in Denver, Colorado. It is a resource for informal science education in the Rocky Mountain region. A variety of exhibitions, programs, and activities help museum visitors learn about the natural history of Colorado, Earth, and the universe. The 716,000-square-foot (66,519 m2) building houses more than one million objects in its collections including natural history and anthropological materials, as well as archival and library resources. The museum is an independent, nonprofit institution with approximately 350 full-time and part-time staff, more than 1,800 volunteers, and a 25-member board of trustees
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Junior Synonym
In scientific nomenclature, a synonym is a scientific name that applies to a taxon that (now) goes by a different scientific name,[1] although the term is used somewhat differently in the zoological code of nomenclature.[2] For example, Linnaeus was the first to give a scientific name (under the currently used system of scientific nomenclature) to the Norway spruce, which he called Pinus abies. This name is no longer in use: it is now a synonym of the current scientific name which is Picea abies. Unlike synonyms in other contexts, in taxonomy a synonym is not interchangeable with the name of which it is a synonym. In taxonomy, synonyms are not equals, but have a different status. For any taxon with a particular circumscription, position, and rank, only one scientific name is considered to be the correct one at any given time (this correct name is to be determined by applying the relevant code of nomenclature)
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Taxonomists
Taxonomy (from Ancient Greek τάξις (taxis), meaning 'arrangement', and -νομία (-nomia), meaning 'method') is the science of defining and naming groups of biological organisms on the basis of shared characteristics. Organisms are grouped together into taxa (singular: taxon) and these groups are given a taxonomic rank; groups of a given rank can be aggregated to form a super-group of higher rank, thus creating a taxonomic hierarchy. The principal ranks in modern use are domain, kingdom, phylum (division is sometimes used in botany in place of phylum), class, order, family, genus and species
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Genus
A genus (/ˈdʒiːnəs/, pl. genera /ˈdʒɛnərə/) is a taxonomic rank used in the biological classification of living and fossil organisms in biology. In the hierarchy of biological classification, genus comes above species and below family. In binomial nomenclature, the genus name forms the first part of the binomial species name for each species within the genus.E.g. Felis catus
Felis catus
and Felis silvestris
Felis silvestris
are two species within the genus Felis. Felis
Felis
is a genus within the family Felidae.The composition of a genus is determined by a taxonomist. The standards for genus classification are not strictly codified, so different authorities often produce different classifications for genera
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Paleontology
Paleontology
Paleontology
or palaeontology (/ˌpeɪliɒnˈtɒlədʒi, ˌpæli-, -ən-/) is the scientific study of life that existed prior to, and sometimes including, the start of the Holocene
Holocene
Epoch (roughly 11,700 years before present). It includes the study of fossils to determine organisms' evolution and interactions with each other and their environments (their paleoecology). Paleontological observations have been documented as far back as the 5th century BC. The science became established in the 18th century as a result of Georges Cuvier's work on comparative anatomy, and developed rapidly in the 19th century. The term itself originates from Greek παλαιός, palaios, "old, ancient", ὄν, on (gen
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Gregory S. Paul
Accurate dinosaur restorations Pioneering feathered theropods during " Dinosaur
Dinosaur
Renaissance" Technical/popular books and articles, criticism of religionScientific careerFields Paleontology, Paleoart, Sociology, TheologyInstitutions IndependentInfluences Charles R. Knight, William Scheele, Bill BerryInfluenced Artists during and after the " Dinosaur
Dinosaur
Renaissance"Gregory Scott Paul (born December 24, 1954) is an American freelance researcher, author and illustrator who works in paleontology, and more recently has examined sociology and theology
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Robert T. Bakker
Robert Thomas Bakker (born March 24, 1945) is an American paleontologist who helped reshape modern theories about dinosaurs, particularly by adding support to the theory that some dinosaurs were endothermic (warm-blooded).[2] Along with his mentor John Ostrom, Bakker was responsible for initiating the ongoing "dinosaur renaissance" in paleontological studies, beginning with Bakker's article " Dinosaur
Dinosaur
Renaissance" in the April 1975 issue of Scientific American. His special field is the ecological context and behavior of dinosaurs. Bakker has been a major proponent of the theory that dinosaurs were "warm-blooded," smart, fast and adaptable. He published his first paper on dinosaur endothermy in 1968. His seminal work, The Dinosaur Heresies, was published in 1986. He revealed the first evidence of parental care at nesting sites for Allosaurus
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American Museum Of Natural History
AMNH.orgAmerican Museum
Museum
of Natural HistoryU.S. National Register of Historic PlacesNYC LandmarkBuilt 1874; 144 years ago (1874)NRHP reference # 76001235[4]Significant datesAdded to NRHP June 24, 1976Designated NYCL August 24, 1967The American Museum
Museum
of Natural History (abbreviated as AMNH), located on the Upper West Side
Upper West Side
of Manhattan, New York City, is one of the largest museums in the world. Located in Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt
Park across the street from Central Park, the museum complex comprises 28 interconnected buildings housing 45 permanent exhibition halls, in addition to a planetarium and a library
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Kenneth Carpenter
Kenneth Carpenter (born September 21, 1949 in Tokyo, Japan) is a paleontologist. He is the museum director of the USU Eastern Prehistoric Museum and author or co-author of a number of books on dinosaurs and Mesozoic life. He has an interest in the movie monster Godzilla[citation needed]. His main research interests are armored dinosaurs ( Ankylosauria
Ankylosauria
and Stegosauria), as well as the Early Cretaceous dinosaurs from the Cedar Mountain Formation in eastern Utah. Bibliography[edit]Kenneth Carpenter, (1999) Eggs, Nests, and Baby Dinosaurs: A Look at Dinosaur
Dinosaur
Reproduction (Life of the Past), Indiana University Press; ISBN 0-253-33497-7. ----- The Dinosaurs of Marsh and Cope (out of print). Kenneth Carpenter (Editor), Philip J
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Corson County, South Dakota
Corson County is a county located in the U.S. state of South Dakota. As of the 2010 census, the population was 4,050.[1] Its county seat is McIntosh.[2] The county was named for Dighton Corson, a native of Maine, who came to the Black Hills in 1876, and in 1877 began practicing law at Deadwood. The county is encompassed within the Standing Rock Indian Reservation, which extends into North Dakota. The Lakota people reside primarily in the South Dakota part of the reservation; the Yanktonai and Dakota live in that part in North Dakota. The Grand River, a tributary of the Missouri River, runs through the reservation.Contents1 Geography1.1 Major highways 1.2 Adjacent counties 1.3 National protected area2 Demographics2.1 2000 census 2.2 2010 census3 Communities3.1 Cities 3.2 Town 3.3 Census-designated places 3.4 Unincorporated communities 3.5 Townships 3.6 Unorganized territories4 Notable residents 5 Politics 6 See also 7 ReferencesGeography[edit] According to the U.S
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Megaannum
A year is the orbital period of the Earth
Earth
moving in its orbit around the Sun. Due to the Earth's axial tilt, the course of a year sees the passing of the seasons, marked by changes in weather, the hours of daylight, and, consequently, vegetation and soil fertility. In temperate and subpolar regions around the planet, four seasons are generally recognized: spring, summer, autumn and winter. In tropical and subtropical regions several geographical sectors do not present defined seasons; but in the seasonal tropics, the annual wet and dry seasons are recognized and tracked. The current year is 2018. A calendar year is an approximation of the number of days of the Earth's orbital period as counted in a given calendar. The Gregorian, or modern, calendar, presents its calendar year to be either a common year of 365 days or a leap year of 366 days, as do the Julian calendars; see below
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Barnum Brown
Barnum Brown
Barnum Brown
(February 12, 1873 – February 5, 1963),[1] commonly referred to as Mr. Bones, was an American paleontologist. Named after the circus showman P. T. Barnum, he discovered the first documented remains of Tyrannosaurus
Tyrannosaurus
rex during a career that made him one of the most famous fossil hunters working from the late Victorian era into the early 20th century. Contents1 Fossil dinosaur expeditions 2 Earliest anthropoid discovery 3 Public persona 4 References 5 Sources 6 External linksFossil dinosaur expeditions[edit] Sponsored by the American Museum of Natural History
American Museum of Natural History
(AMNH), Brown traversed the country bargaining and trading for fossils. His field was not limited to dinosaurs. He was known to collect or obtain anything of possible scientific value
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Bob Bakker
Robert Thomas Bakker (born March 24, 1945) is an American paleontologist who helped reshape modern theories about dinosaurs, particularly by adding support to the theory that some dinosaurs were endothermic (warm-blooded).[2] Along with his mentor John Ostrom, Bakker was responsible for initiating the ongoing "dinosaur renaissance" in paleontological studies, beginning with Bakker's article " Dinosaur
Dinosaur
Renaissance" in the April 1975 issue of Scientific American. His special field is the ecological context and behavior of dinosaurs. Bakker has been a major proponent of the theory that dinosaurs were "warm-blooded," smart, fast and adaptable. He published his first paper on dinosaur endothermy in 1968. His seminal work, The Dinosaur Heresies, was published in 1986. He revealed the first evidence of parental care at nesting sites for Allosaurus
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Denver, Colorado
Denver
Denver
(/ˈdɛnvər/), officially the City and County of Denver, is the capital and most populous municipality of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Colorado. Denver
Denver
is in the South Platte River
South Platte River
Valley on the western edge of the High Plains just east of the Front Range
Front Range
of the Rocky Mountains
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