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Dendra Panoply
The Dendra
Dendra
panoply or Dendra
Dendra
armour is an example of Mycenaean-era panoply (full-body armor) made of bronze plates uncovered in the village of Dendra
Dendra
in the Argolid, Greece.Contents1 Description 2 Notes 3 References 4 External linksDescription[edit] Several elements of body armour (body cuirass, shoulder guards, breast plates and lower protection plates) from the late Mycenaean period have been found at Thebes, some bronze bands have been also found at Mycenae
Mycenae
and Phaistos.[1] Bronze scales were found at Mycenae
Mycenae
and Troy; scale armour, the oldest form of metal body armor, was used widely throughout the eastern Mediterranean and the Near East
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Knossos
Total inhabited area: 10 km2 (3.9 sq mi). Palace: 14,000 m2 (150,000 sq ft)[2]Height UnknownHistoryBuilder UnknownFounded First settlement about 7000 BC. First palace dates to 1900 BC.Abandoned Some time in Late Minoan IIIC, 1380–1100 BCPeriods Neolithic
Neolithic
to Late Bronze Age
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Greave
A greave (from the Old French
Old French
greve "shin, shin armour" from the Arabic jaurab, meaning stocking[1]) is a piece of armour that protects the leg.Contents1 Description 2 History2.1 Ancient Greece and Rome 2.2 Medieval Europe 2.3 Feudal Japan3 Gallery 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksDescription[edit] The primary purpose of greaves is to protect the tibia from attack. The tibia is a bone very close to the skin, and is therefore extremely vulnerable to just about any kind of attack. Furthermore, a successful attack on the shin results in that leg being rendered useless, greatly hampering one's ability to maneuver in any way.[2] Greaves were used to counteract this. Greaves usually consisted of a metal exterior with an inner padding of felt
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Ramesses III
Ramesses IV, Ramesses VI, Ramesses VIII, Amun-her-khepeshef, Meryamun, Pareherwenemef, Khaemwaset, Meryatum, Montuherkhopshef, Pentawere, Duatentopet
Duatentopet
(?)Father SetnakhteMother Tiy-MereneseBorn 1217 BCDied 1155 BCBurial KV11Monuments Medinet HabuUsimare Ramesses III
Ramesses III
(also written Ramses and Rameses) was the second Pharaoh
Pharaoh
of the Twentieth Dynasty in Ancient Egypt. He is thought to have reigned from 1186 to 1155 BC and is considered to be the last monarch of the New Kingdom
New Kingdom
to wield any substantial authority over Egypt. His long reign saw the decline of Egyptian political and economic power, linked to a series of invasions and internal economic problems. Ramesses III
Ramesses III
was the son of Setnakhte
Setnakhte
and Queen Tiy-Merenese
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Peoples Of The Sea
The Sea Peoples
Sea Peoples
are a purported seafaring confederation that attacked ancient Egypt
Egypt
and other regions of the
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Corslet
A corslet is defined by the Oxford English Dictionary as "a piece of defensive armour covering the body." In ancient Egypt, Ramesses II
Ramesses II
is said to have worn a similar device in some battle(s). In Ancient Greek armies, the 'hoplite', or heavy infantryman, wore a bronze corslet or known as the thorax (or a linen version known as the linothorax) to protect his upper body. The corslet consisted of two plates connected on the sides via hinges and bronze pins. By the 16th century, the corslet, also spelled corselet, was popular as a light-half-armour for general military use, e.g., by town guards. It was made up of a gorget, breast covering, back and tassets, full arms and gauntlets. In the 10th and 11th century AD depicts some Byzantine troops wearing a metallic corselet lamellar armour (besides the lorikion scale armour that was widely used by the Stratioti) shown in the Skylitzes and Madrid Skylitzes chronicles and of the menologion of basil II
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National Archaeological Museum, Athens
The National Archaeological Museum (Greek: Εθνικό Αρχαιολογικό Μουσείο) in Athens
Athens
houses some of the most important artifacts from a variety of archaeological locations around Greece
Greece
from prehistory to late antiquity
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Warrior Vase
The Mycenaean Warrior Vase, found by Heinrich Schliemann
Heinrich Schliemann
on the acropolis of Mycenae, is one of the prominent treasures of the National Archaeological Museum, Athens.[1] The Warrior Vase, dated to the 13th century BCE, is probably the best-known piece of Late Helladic pottery.[2] It is a krater, a mixing bowl used for the dilution of wine with water, a custom which the ancient Greeks believed to be a sign of civilized behavior. The broad frieze of armed soldiers on the vase, which is incomplete, suggested the name that Schliemann gave it. The warriors are clad in short chitons, breastplates, helmets and greaves; they are armed with spears and carry shields. The bull's head handles for long encouraged scholars to date the piece later, in the early seventh century BCE. Many Scholars observe that the style of the figures and the bull head handles of this thirteenth century BCE vase are very similar to eighth century BCE pottery
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Tiryns
Tiryns
Tiryns
/ˈtɪrɪnz/ or /ˈtaɪrɪnz/ (Ancient Greek: Τίρυνς; Modern Greek: Τίρυνθα) is a Mycenaean archaeological site in Argolis
Argolis
in the Peloponnese, some kilometres north of Nafplio. Tiryns
Tiryns
was a hill fort with occupation ranging back seven thousand years, from before the beginning of the Bronze Age. It reached its height between 1400 and 1200 BCE, when it was one of the most important centers of the Mycenaean world, and in particular in Argolis. Its most notable features were its palace, its cyclopean tunnels and especially its walls, which gave the city its Homeric epithet of "mighty walled Tiryns"
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Pylos
Pylos
Pylos
((UK: /ˈpaɪlɒs/, US: /ˈpaɪloʊs/; Greek: Πύλος), historically also known under its Italian name Navarino, is a town and a former municipality in Messenia, Peloponnese, Greece. Since the 2011 local government reform it is part of the municipality Pylos-Nestoras, of which it is the seat and a municipal unit.[2] It was the capital of the former Pylia Province. It is the main harbour on the Bay of Navarino. Nearby villages include Gialova, Pyla, Elaiofyto, Schinolakka, and Palaionero. The town of Pylos
Pylos
has 2,767 inhabitants, the municipal unit of Pylos
Pylos
5,287 (2011)
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Argos
Argos
Argos
(/ˈɑːrɡɒs, -ɡəs/; Modern Greek: Άργος [ˈarɣos]; Ancient Greek: Ἄργος [árɡos]) is a city in Argolis, the Peloponnese, Greece
Greece
and once was one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the world.[citation needed] It is the biggest town in Argolis
Argolis
and a major centre for the area. Since the 2011 local government reform it has been part of the municipality of Argos-Mykines, of which it is a municipal unit.[2] The municipal unit has an area of 138.138 km2.[3] It is 11 kilometres (7 miles) from Nafplion, which was its historic harbour
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Linear B
Linear B
Linear B
is a syllabic script that was used for writing Mycenaean Greek, the earliest attested form of Greek. The script predates the Greek alphabet
Greek alphabet
by several centuries. The oldest Mycenaean writing dates to about 1450 BC.[1] It is descended from the older Linear A, an undeciphered earlier script used for writing the Minoan language, as is the later Cypriot syllabary, which also recorded Greek. Linear B, found mainly in the palace archives at Knossos, Cydonia,[2] Pylos, Thebes and Mycenae,[3] disappeared with the fall of Mycenaean civilization during the Late Bronze Age
Late Bronze Age
collapse. The succeeding period, known as the Greek Dark Ages, provides no evidence of the use of writing
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Panoply
A panoply is a complete suit of armour. The word represents the ancient Greek πανοπλία (panoplía), where the word πᾶν pân means "all", and ὅπλον hóplon, "arms". Thus panoply refers to the full armour of a hoplite or heavy-armed soldier, i.e. the shield, breastplate, helmet and greaves, together with the sword and lance. As applied to armour of a later date, panoply did not come into use till the end of the 16th and beginning of the 17th century, and was then used of the complete suits of plate armour covering the whole body. Because a panoply is a complete set of diverse components, the word panoply has come to refer to any complete or impressive collection. References[edit]External links[edit] Media related to Panoplia at Wikimedia Commons  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "article name needed". Encyclopædia Britannica (11th ed.)
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Geometric Period
Geometric art
Geometric art
is a phase of Greek art, characterized largely by geometric motifs in vase painting, that flourished towards the end of the Greek Dark Ages, circa 900 BC – 700 BC
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Anthony Snodgrass
Anthony McElrea Snodgrass FBA (born 7 July 1934) is an academic and archaeologist noted for his work on Archaic Greece.Contents1 Biography 2 Works 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Born to William McElrea and Kathleen (Owen) Snodgrass, he gained his M.A. and D.Phil in 1963. He is Emeritus Professor in Classical Archaeology at the University of Cambridge
University of Cambridge
and a specialist in Archaic Greece. He is a Fellow of Clare College
Clare College
and of the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research. He chairs the British Committee for the Reunification of the Parthenon Marbles. He taught at Edinburgh University
Edinburgh University
from 1961 to 1976 making the move down to Cambridge University
Cambridge University
in the same year. While there he was appointed the sixth Laurence Professor of Classical Archaeology from 1976 to 2001
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Cuirass
A cuirass (/kwɪˈræs/, /kjuːˈræs/;[1] French: cuirasse, Latin: coriaceus) is a piece of armour, formed of a single or multiple pieces of metal or other rigid material which covers the front of the torso. In a suit of armour, the cuirass was generally connected to a back piece. Cuirass
Cuirass
could also refer to the complete torso-protecting armour.Contents1 Description 2 History2.1 The Japanese cuirass3 See also 4 ReferencesDescription[edit] In Hellenistic and Roman times, the musculature of the male torso was idealized in the form of the muscle cuirass[2] or "heroic cuirass" (in French the cuirasse esthétique)[3] sometimes further embellished with symbolic representation in relief, familiar in the Augustus of Prima Porta and other heroic representations in official Roman sculpture
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