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Demographics Of Mongolia
This article is about the demographics of Mongolia, including population density, ethnicity, education level, health of the populace, economic status, religious affiliations and other aspects of the population.Contents1 Vital statistics1.1 UN estimates[5] 1.2 Registered births and deaths 1.3 Structure of the population[6]2 Ethnicity and languages2.1 Ethnicity 2.2 Literacy3 Religions 4 Urbanization 5 Base demographic indicators for Mongolia 6 See also 7 ReferencesVital statistics[edit] UN estimates[5][edit]Period Live births per year Deaths per year Natural change per year CBR1 CDR1 NC1 TFR1 IMR11950-1955 33 000 18 000 15 000 40.0 21.4 18.6 5.60 182.91955-1960 39 000 19 000 20 000 43.0 20.7 22.2 6.30 164.91960-1965 49 000 19 000 30 000 47.9 18.4 29.5 7.50 134.51965-1970 54 000 19 000 34 000 44.8 15.9 28.8 7.50 118.61970-1975 59 000 19 000 40 000 43.0 13.9 29.1 7.50 106.51975-1980 63 000 21
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Khorchin Mongols
The Khorchin
Khorchin
(Хорчин, Horçin; ᠬᠤᠷᠴᠢᠨ Qorčin) is a subgroup of the Mongols
Mongols
that speak the Khorchin
Khorchin
dialect of Mongolian and predominantly live in northeastern Inner Mongolia
Inner Mongolia
of China.Contents1 History 2 Popular culture 3 References 4 Notes 5 Sources 6 See alsoHistory[edit] The Ming dynasty
Ming dynasty
gave Borjigin
Borjigin
princes (descended from Genghis Khan's brothers) command of the Taining Guard, one of the Three Guards established in 1389. In 1446-48 most of the guards fled in the wake of Esen Tayisi's invasions. However, the Fuyu Guard, another of the Three Guards, remained along the Nen and Onon rivers
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Darkhad
The Darkhad, Darqads,[2] or Dalhut[3] (Mongolian for "Untouchables",[4] "Protected Ones", or "Workmen of Darkhan),[citation needed] also known by their Chinese name Da'erkute[5] or Da'erhute,[citation needed] are a subgroup of Mongol people living mainly in northern Mongolia, in the Bayanzürkh, Ulaan-Uul, Renchinlkhümbe, and Tsagaannuur sums of Khövsgöl Province. The Darkhad valley
Darkhad valley
is named after them. The regional variant of Mongol language is the Darkhad dialect. In the 2000 census, 16,268 people identified themselves as Darkhad. The Darkhad were originally part of the Oirat or Khotgoid
Khotgoid
tribes. Between 1549 and 1686, they were subjects of Zasagt Khan aimag and the Khotgoid
Khotgoid
Altan Khan. In 1786 they became part of the Jebtsundamba Khutuktu's shabi otog
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Korean Language
The Language Research Institute, Academy of Social Science 사회과학원 어학연구소 / 社會科學院 語學研究所 (Democratic People's Republic of Korea) National Institute of the Korean Language 국립국어원 / 國立國語院 (Republic of Korea) China
China
Korean Language Regulatory Commission 중국조선어규범위원회 中国朝鲜语规范委员会 (People's Republic of China)Language codesISO 639-1 koISO 639-2 korISO 639-3 Variously: kor – Modern Korean jje – Jeju okm – Middle Korean oko – Old Korean oko – Proto KoreanLinguist Listokm Middle Korean  oko Old KoreanGlottolog kore1280[2]Linguasphere 45-AAA-aCountries with native Korean-speaking populations (established immigrant communities in green).This article contains IPA phonetic symbols
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German Language
No official regulation ( German orthography
German orthography
regulated by the Council for German Orthography[4]). Language
Language
codesISO 639-1 deISO 639-2 ger
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Ethno-linguistic
Ethnolinguistics (sometimes called cultural linguistics)[1] is a field of linguistics that studies the relationship between language and culture and how different ethnic groups perceive the world. It is the combination between ethnology and linguistics. The former refers to the way of life of an entire community: all the characteristics that distinguish one community from the other. Such characteristics make the cultural aspects of a community or a society. Ethnolinguists study the way perception and conceptualization influences language and show how that is linked to different cultures and societies. An example is how spatial orientation is expressed in various cultures.[2][3] In many societies, words for the cardinal directions east and west are derived from terms for sunrise/sunset. The nomenclature for cardinal directions of Inuit speakers of Greenland, however, is based on geographical landmarks such as the river system and one's position on the coast
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Mongolic Languages
The Mongolic languages
Mongolic languages
are a group of languages spoken in East-Central Asia, mostly in Mongolia
Mongolia
and surrounding areas plus in Kalmykia. The best-known member of this language family, Mongolian, is the primary language of most of the residents of Mongolia
Mongolia
and the Mongolian residents of Inner Mongolia, China
China
with an estimated 5.7+ million speakers.[3] The closest relatives of the Mongolic languages
Mongolic languages
appear to be the extinct Khitan[1] and Tuyuhun languages
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Dörbet (Choros Clan)
The Dörbet (Kalmyk: Дөрвд, Dörwd; Mongolian: Дөрвөд, Dörwöd, ᠳᠥᠷᠪᠡᠳ, lit. "the Fours"; Chinese: 杜尔伯特部; pinyin: Dù'ěrbótè Bù; also known in English as the Derbet) is the second largest subgroup of Mongol people in modern Mongolia and was formerly one of the major tribes of the Four Oirat confederation in the 15th-18th centuries. In early times, the Dörbet and the Dzungars were ruled by collateral branches of the Choros. The Dörbets are distributed among the western provinces of Mongolia, Kalmykia, and in a small portion in Heilongjiang, China. In modern-day Mongolia, the Dörbets are centered in Uvs Province.Contents1 History 2 Number 3 Notable people 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] A Dörben clan of Duwa Sohor's four sons existed within the Khamag Mongol confederation in the 12th century; but their relation with the Dörbets is unclear
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Bayid
The Bayad
Bayad
(Mongol: Баяд/Bayad, lit. "the Riches") is third largest subgroup of the Mongols
Mongols
in Mongolia
Mongolia
and they are a tribe in Four Oirats. Bayids were a prominent clan within the Mongol Empire. Bayids can be found in both Mongolic and Turkic peoples. Within Mongols, the clan is spread through Khalkha, Inner Mongolians, Buryats
Buryats
and Oirats.Contents1 History 2 Notable members 3 Modern demographics 4 References 5 Literature 6 See alsoHistory[edit]This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it. (February 2011) Mongol Empire
Mongol Empire
c.1207Mongol states XIV-XVII: 1. Northern Yuan dynasty
Northern Yuan dynasty
2. Four Oirat
Four Oirat
3.Karadel 4
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Zakhchin
The Zakhchin
Zakhchin
(Mongolian: Захчин) is a subgroup of the Oirats residing in Khovd Province, Mongolia. Zakhchin
Zakhchin
means 'Border people'. They are so called because they originated from the border garrison (mainly from Torghud, Dörbet, Ööld) of Dzungar Empire. They originally speak the Zakhchin
Zakhchin
dialect of the Oirat language, but actually pure Oirat language
Oirat language
is used by elder generations, younger generations use a dialect being under a strong Khalkh influence.Contents1 History 2 Clans 3 Number 4 Famous Zakhchins in modern Mongolia 5 References 6 LiteratureHistory[edit] The Zakhchins conquered by the Manchus of the Qing dynasty
Qing dynasty
in 1754 and controlled by Zasagt Khan aimag's Tsevdenjav gün, then moved to Zereg and Shar Khulsan
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Dariganga Mongols
The Dariganga (Mongolian: Дарьганга) are an eastern Mongol subgroup who mainly live in Dari Ovoo
Dari Ovoo
and Ganga Lake, Sukhbaatar Province. It is believed[by whom?] that the Dariganga were resettled by the Qing Dynasty from Chahar, Khalkha
Khalkha
and Ööled
Ööled
to herd horses of the Emperor in the late 1690s. From 1912 on, a Ministry of Internal Affairs of the Boghda Khaanate of Mongolia
Mongolia
supervised them. And the People's Republic of Mongolia changed their banner system in 1921
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Altai Uriankhai
The Altai Uriankhai (Mongolian: Алтайн Урианхай, Altain Urianhai or Altai-yn Urianhai; simplified Chinese: 阿尔泰乌梁海; traditional Chinese: 阿爾泰烏梁海; pinyin: Ā'ěrtài Wūliánghǎi) refer to a Mongolian tribe around the Altai Mountains that were organized by the Qing dynasty. They now form a subgroup in western Mongolia and eastern Xinjiang.Map of the Jütgelt Gün's hoshuu (banner) of the Altai Urianhai in western Mongolia.The Uriyangkhai or Uriankhai people first appeared in the 7th century as one of the people in Mongolia (Legend of the Erkune kun). The Mongolian term Uriankhai (Uriyangkhai) had been applied to all Samoyed, Turkic or Mongol people to the north-west of Mongolia in the 17th century. The Uriyangkhai in this sense were first subjugated by the Khotgoid Khalkha and then by the Dzungars. In the mid 14th century, they lived in Liaoyang province of modern China
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Khotogoid
Khotogoid
Khotogoid
(Mongolian: Хотгойд, transliteration: Khotgoid) is a subgroup of Mongol people in northwestern Mongolia. The Khotogoid people live roughly between Uvs Lake
Uvs Lake
to the west and the Delgermörön river to the east. The Khotogoids belong to north western Khalkha
Khalkha
and were one of the major groups that make up Khalkha. The best known ruler of Khotogoids probably was Ubashi Huang Taizi, also known as Altan Khan of the Khotogoid (not to be confused with Altan Khan
Altan Khan
of Tumed) who was successful in subjecting Yenisei Kirghiz and pushing Oirats
Oirats
out of their domains in western Mongolia
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Russian Language
Russian (Russian: ру́сский язы́к, tr. rússkiy yazýk) is an East Slavic language
East Slavic language
and an official language in Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan
Kyrgyzstan
and many minor or unrecognised territories throughout Eurasia
Eurasia
(particularly in Eastern Europe, the Baltics, the Caucasus, and Central Asia). It is an unofficial but widely spoken language in Latvia, Moldova, Ukraine
Ukraine
and to a lesser extent, the other post-Soviet states.[31][32] Russian belongs to the family of Indo-European languages
Indo-European languages
and is one of the four living members of the East Slavic languages
Slavic languages
(which in turn is part of the larger Balto-Slavic branch)
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Torghut
The Torghut
Torghut
(Mongolian: Торгууд/Torguud, "Guardsman" or "the Silks") are one of the four major subgroups of the Four Oirats. The Torghut
Torghut
nobles traced its descent to the Keraite ruler Tooril also many Torghuts descended from the Keraites.Contents1 History 2 Language 3 Modern notable Torghuts in Mongolia 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] They might have been kheshigs of the Great Khans before Kublai Khan. The Torghut
Torghut
clan first appeared as an Oirat group in the mid-16th century. After the collapse of the Four Oirat Alliance, the majority of the Torghuts under Kho Orluk separated from other Oirat groups and moved west to the Volga
Volga
region in 1630, forming the core of the Kalmyks
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Barga Mongols
The Barga (Mongol: Барга; simplified Chinese: 巴尔虎部; traditional Chinese: 巴爾虎部; pinyin: Bā'ěrhǔ Bù) are a subgroup of the Mongol people which gave its name to the Baikal region – "Bargujin-Tukum" (Bargujin Tökhöm) – “the land’s end”, according to the 13th-14th centuries Mongol people’s conception.[2]Contents1 Apparition in History1.1 14th to 17th centuries 1.2 Qing dynasty 1.3 Relocation2 References 3 External linksApparition in History[edit] Mongol Empire
Mongol Empire
c.1207, showing Bargujin-TukumIn the 12–13th centuries, the Barga Mongols
Mongols
appeared as tribes near Lake Baikal, named Bargujin. Genghis Khan's ancestor Alan Gua was of Barga ancestry. In the Mongol Empire, they served the Great Khans' armies
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