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Demmin
Demmin
Demmin
(German pronunciation: [dɛˈmiːn]) is a town in the Mecklenburgische Seenplatte district, Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, Germany. It was the capital of the former district of Demmin.Contents1 Geography1.1 Neighbouring towns and villages 1.2 Subdivisions2 History2.1 Name 2.2 Prehistory 2.3 Saxon
Saxon
Wars to 10th century 2.4 Middle Ages 2.5 Modern Age3 Coat of arms 4 Famous residents 5 References 6 External linksGeography[edit] Demmin
Demmin
lies on the West Pomeranian plain at the confluence of the rivers Peene, Tollense
Tollense
and Trebel. Lake Kummerow
Lake Kummerow
and the Bay of Stettin (Oderhaff) may be reached by boat on the Peene, Neubrandenburg via Altentreptow
Altentreptow
on by-roads and cycleways
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Saxon Wars
The Saxon Wars
Saxon Wars
were the campaigns and insurrections of the more than thirty years from 772, when Charlemagne
Charlemagne
first entered Saxony
Saxony
with the intent to conquer, to 804, when the last rebellion of disaffected tribesmen was crushed. In all, eighteen battles were fought in what is now northwestern Germany. They resulted in the incorporation of Saxony into the Frankish realm and their forcible conversion from Germanic paganism to Catholicism.[1] Despite repeated setbacks, the Saxons
Saxons
resisted steadfastly, returning to raid Charlemagne's domains as soon as he turned his attention elsewhere
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Low German
Plattdütsch, Plattdüütsch, Plattdütsk, Plattduitsk German: Plattdeutsch, Niederdeutsch Dutch: NederduitsNative to Northern Germany Western Germany Eastern Netherlands Southern DenmarkEthnicity Dutch, Frisians
Frisians
and Germans; Historically Saxons ( Germanic peoples
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Saxon
The Saxons
Saxons
(Latin: Saxones, Old English: Seaxe, Old Saxon: Sahson, Low German: Sassen) were a group of Germanic tribes first mentioned as living near the North Sea
North Sea
coast of what is now Germany
Germany
(Old Saxony), in the late Roman Empire. They were soon mentioned as raiding and settling in many North Sea
North Sea
areas, as well as pushing south inland towards the Franks
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Slavic Languages
The Slavic languages
Slavic languages
(also called Slavonic languages) are the Indo-European languages
Indo-European languages
spoken by the Slavic peoples. They are thought to descend from a proto-language called Proto-Slavic spoken during the Early Middle Ages, which in turn is thought to have descended from the earlier Proto-Balto-Slavic language, linking the Slavic languages
Slavic languages
to the Baltic languages
Baltic languages
in a Balto-Slavic group within the Indo-European family. The Slavic languages
Slavic languages
are divided intro three subgroups: East, West, and South, which together constitute more than twenty languages
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Polabian Language
The Polabian language
Polabian language
is an extinct West Slavic language that was spoken by the Polabian Slavs
Polabian Slavs
(German: Wenden) in present-day northeastern Germany
Germany
around the Elbe
Elbe
(Labe in Slavic) river, from which derives its name ("po Labe" - on the Elbe). It was spoken approximately until the mid-18th century, when it was superseded by Low German, in the areas of Mecklenburg-West Pomerania, central Brandenburg
Brandenburg
(Mittelmark) and eastern Saxony-Anhalt
Saxony-Anhalt
(Wittenberg), as well as in eastern parts of Lower Saxony
Lower Saxony
(Wendland) and Schleswig-Holstein
Schleswig-Holstein
( Ostholstein
Ostholstein
and Lauenburg)
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Adam Of Bremen
Adam of Bremen
Bremen
(Latin: Adamus Bremensis; German: Adam von Bremen) was a German medieval chronicler. He lived and worked in the second half of the eleventh century. He is most famous for his chronicle Gesta Hammaburgensis Ecclesiae Pontificum (Deeds of Bishops of the Hamburg Church). Little is known of his life other than hints from his own chronicles. He is believed to have come from Meissen
Meissen
( Latin
Latin
Misnia) in Saxony.[1] The dates of his birth and death are uncertain, but he was probably born before 1050 and died on 12 October of an unknown year (possibly 1081, at the latest 1085). From his chronicles it is apparent that he was familiar with a number of authors. The honorary name of Magister Adam shows that he had passed through all the stages of a higher education
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Latinisation Of Names
Latinisation (also spelled Latinization[1]: see spelling differences) is the practice of rendering a non- Latin
Latin
name (or word) in a Latin style.[1] It is commonly found with historical personal names, with toponyms and in the standard binomial nomenclature of the life sciences. It goes further than romanisation, which is the transliteration of a word to the Latin
Latin
alphabet from another script (e.g. Cyrillic). This was often done in the classical to emulate Latin
Latin
authors, or to present a more impressive image. In a scientific context, the main purpose of Latinisation may be to produce a name which is internationally consistent. Latinisation may be carried out by:transforming the name into Latin
Latin
sounds (e.g. Geber for Jabir), or adding Latinate suffixes to the end of a name (e.g
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Linear Pottery Culture
farming, animal husbandry pottery, metallurgy, wheel circular ditches, henges, megaliths Neolithic
Neolithic
religion↓ ChalcolithicLinear pottery: "The vessels are oblated globes, cut off on the top and slightly flattened on the bottom suggestive of a gourd."—Frank Hibben[2] Note the imitation of painted bands by incising the edges of the band. Stroked Ware is shown in the upper left corner.The Linear Pottery
Pottery
culture is a major archaeological horizon of the European Neolithic, flourishing c. 5500–4500 BC. It is abbreviated as LBK (from German: Linearbandkeramik), and is also known as the Linear Band Ware, Linear Ware, Linear Ceramics or Incised Ware culture, and falls within the Danubian I culture of V. Gordon Childe. The densest evidence for the culture is on the middle Danube, the upper and middle Elbe, and the upper and middle Rhine. It represents a major event in the initial spread of agriculture in Europe
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Trebel
Trebel
Trebel
is a municipality in the district Lüchow-Dannenberg, in Lower Saxony, Germany.v t eTowns and municipalities in Lüchow-Dannenberg
Lüchow-Dannenberg
(district)Bergen an der Dumme Clenze Damnatz Dannenberg Gartow Göhrde Gorleben Gusborn Hitzacker Höhbeck Jameln Karwitz Küsten Langendorf Lemgow Lübbow Lüchow Luckau Neu Darchau Prezelle Schnackenburg Schnega Trebel Waddeweitz Woltersdorf Wustrow ZernienReferences[edit]^ Landesbetrieb für Statistik und Kommunikationstechnologie Niedersachsen, 102 Bevölkerung - Basis Zensus 2011, Stand 31. Dezember 2015 (Tabelle K1020014)Authority controlGND: 4691641-6This Lüchow-Dannenberg
Lüchow-Dannenberg
location article is a stub
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Funnelbeaker Culture
Near East Ghassulian
Ghassulian
culture, Naqada culture, Uruk periodEuropeYamna culture, Corded Ware Cernavodă culture, Decea Mureşului culture, Gorneşti culture, Gumelniţa–Karanovo culture, Petreşti culture, Coțofeni culture Remedello culture, Gaudo culture, Monte Claro cultureCentral AsiaYamna culture, Botai culture, BMAC culture, Afanasevo cultureSouth AsiaPeriodisation of the Indus Valley Civilisation, Bhirrana
Bhirrana
culture, Hakra Ware culture, Kaytha
Kaytha
culture, Ahar-Banas culture Savalda Culture, Malwa culture, Jorwe cultureChina MesoamericaMetallurgy, Wheel, Domestication
Domestication
of the horse↓ Bronze Agev t eThe Funnel(-neck-)beaker culture, in short TRB or TBK (German: Trichter(-rand-)becherkultur, Dutch: Trechterbekercultuur; c. 4300 BC–c. 2800 BC) was an archaeological culture in north-central Europe
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Megalith
A megalith is a large stone that has been used to construct a structure or monument, either alone or together with other stones. The word "megalithic" describes structures made of such large stones without the use of mortar or concrete, representing periods of prehistory characterised by such constructions. For later periods, the term monolith, with an overlapping meaning, is more likely to be used. The word "megalith" comes from the Ancient Greek "μέγας" (transl. mégas meaning "great") and "λίθος" (transl. líthos meaning "stone"). Megalith
Megalith
also denotes an item consisting of rock(s) hewn in definite shapes for special purposes.[1][2][3] It has been used to describe buildings built by people from many parts of the world living in many different periods
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Dolmen
A dolmen (/ˈdɒlmɛn/) is a type of single-chamber megalithic tomb, usually consisting of two or more vertical megaliths supporting a large flat horizontal capstone ("table"), although there are also more complex variants. Most date from the early Neolithic
Neolithic
(4000–3000 BC). Dolmens were typically covered with earth or smaller stones to form a tumulus. In many instances, that covering has weathered away, leaving only the stone "skeleton" of the burial mound intact. It remains unclear when, why, and by whom the earliest dolmens were made. The oldest known dolmens are in Western Europe, where they were set in place around 7,000 years ago. Archaeologists still do not know who erected these dolmens, which makes it difficult to know why they did it. They are generally all regarded as tombs or burial chambers, despite the absence of clear evidence for this
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Grave Mound
A tumulus (plural tumuli) is a mound of earth and stones raised over a grave or graves. Tumuli are also known as barrows, burial mounds or kurgans, and may be found throughout much of the world. A cairn, which is a mound of stones built for various purposes, may also originally have been a tumulus. Tumuli are often categorised according to their external apparent shape. In this respect, a long barrow is a long tumulus, usually constructed on top of several burials, such as passage graves. A round barrow is a round tumulus, also commonly constructed on top of burials. The internal structure and architecture of both long and round barrows has a broad range, the categorization only refers to the external apparent shape. The method of inhumation may involve a dolmen, a cist, a mortuary enclosure, a mortuary house, or a chamber tomb
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Germanic Peoples
The Germanic peoples
Germanic peoples
(also called Teutonic, Suebian, or Gothic in older literature) are an Indo-European ethno-linguistic group of Northern European origin.[1] They are identified by their use of Germanic languages, which diversified out of Proto-Germanic
Proto-Germanic
during the Pre-Roman Iron Age.[2] The term "Germanic" originated in classical times when groups of tribes living in Lower, Upper, and Greater Germania
Germania
were referred to using this label by Roman scribes. The Roman use of the term "Germanic" was not necessarily based upon language, but referred to the tribal groups and alliances that lived in the regions of modern-day Luxembourg, Belgium, Northern France, Alsace, Poland, Austria, the Netherlands
Netherlands
and Germany, and which were considered less civilized and more physically hardened than the Celtic Gauls
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