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Delisa Walton-Floyd
Delisa Walton-Floyd (born Delisa Walton, 28 July 1961) is a former World-Class middle distance runner who specialized in the 800 metres; she was a two-time National Collegiate champion, and two-time U.S. Open champion in her event. Delisa Walton-Floyd represented the United States at the 1987 Pan American Games; winning a silver medal at 800 meters. Walton-Floyd also competed at the World Championships in 1987 and 1991; advancing to the semi-final on both occasions.[1] [2] After finishing second at the 1988 U.S. Olympic Team Trials, Walton-Floyd reached the pinnacle of her career at the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul, South Korea. During a very close final race, Walton-Floyd produced a lifetime best performance of 1:57.80 to finish in fifth place - less than a second from a bronze medal. Walton-Floyd is a 1983 graduate of the University of Tennessee, where she earned accolades as an All-American track and field athlete for the Volunteers
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Lat
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Detroit
Detroit
Detroit
(/dɪˈtrɔɪt/)[6] is the most populous city in the U.S. state of Michigan, the largest city on the United States–Canada border, and the seat of Wayne County. The municipality of Detroit
Detroit
had a 2016 estimated population of 672,795, making it the 23rd-most populous city in the United States. The metropolitan area, known as Metro Detroit, is home to 4.3 million people, making it the second-largest in the Midwest
Midwest
after Chicago. Detroit
Detroit
is a major port on the Detroit
Detroit
River, one of the four major straits that connect the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
system to the Saint Lawrence Seaway. The Detroit Metropolitan Airport
Detroit Metropolitan Airport
is among the most important hubs in the United States
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Ruth Wysocki
Ruth Wysocki (born March 8, 1957 in Alhambra, California) is an American middle distance runner who specialized in the 800 meters and 1500 metres. Wysocki began track competition in age-group races in the late 1960s, and continued her track career over a period of about 30 years, until she became a Masters (over-40) runner in 1997
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Wendy Knudson
Wendy Koenig (born May 28, 1955) is an American middle-distance runner. She competed in the 800 metres at the 1972 Summer Olympics and the 1976 Summer Olympics.[1] References[edit]^ "Wendy Koenig Olympic Results". Olympics at Sports-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC
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USA Outdoor Track And Field Championships
The USA Outdoor Track and Field Championships
USA Outdoor Track and Field Championships
is an annual track and field competition organized by USA Track & Field, which serves as the American national championships for the sport. Since 1992, in years which feature a Summer Olympics
Summer Olympics
or a World Championships in Athletics, the championships serve as a way of selecting the best athletes for those competitions.Contents1 History 2 Events 3 Editions 4 Split gender editions 5 Records 6 Most successful athletes6.1 By event7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] The history of the competition starts in 1876, when the New York Athletic Club (NYAC) decided to organize a national championships.[1] Having previously held the NYAC Spring and Fall Games, the seventh edition of the Fall Games became the country's first national track and field championships
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Wayback Machine
The Wayback Machine
Wayback Machine
is a digital archive of the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
and other information on the Internet
Internet
created by the Internet
Internet
Archive, a nonprofit organization, based in San Francisco, California, United States.Contents1 History 2 Technical details2.1 Storage capabilities 2.2 Growth 2.3 Website exclusion policy2.3.1 Oakland Archive
Archive
Policy3 Uses3.1 In legal evidence3.1.1 Civil litigation3.1.1.1 Netbula LLC v. Chordiant Software Inc. 3.1.1.2 Telewizja Polska3.1.2 Patent law 3.1.3 Limitations of utility4 Legal status 5 Archived content legal issues5.1 Scientology 5.2 Healthcare Advocates, Inc. 5.3 Suzanne Shell 5.4 Daniel Davydiuk6 Censorship and other threats 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification
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Athletics (sport)
Athletics is a collection of sporting events that involve competitive running, jumping, throwing, and walking.[1] The most common types of athletics competitions are track and field, road running, cross country running, and race walking. The results of racing events are decided by finishing position (or time, where measured), while the jumps and throws are won by the athlete that achieves the highest or furthest measurement from a series of attempts. The simplicity of the competitions, and the lack of a need for expensive equipment, makes athletics one of the most commonly competed sports in the world. Athletics is mostly an individual sport, with the exception of relay races and competitions which combine athletes' performances for a team score, such as cross country. Organized athletics are traced back to the Ancient Olympic Games
Olympic Games
from 776 BC
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Barbara Gilders-Dudeck
Barbara Sue Gilders (later Dudeck, born July 23, 1937) is a retired American diver. She competed in the 3 m springboard at the 1956 Summer Olympics and 1959 Pan American Games
Pan American Games
and finished fourth and third, respectively.[1] Coached by four-time Olympic medalist, Clarence Pinkston, Gilders entered the Olympics as the 1956 AAU champion, and Olympic Trials silver medalist. Later she won the AAU indoor titles in the one-meter (1958) and three-meter springboard (1959).[2][3] In June 1959, she won the Pan American Games
Pan American Games
trials; later that summer, in what would be her final international competition, Gilders won a bronze medal at the Pan American Games.[4][5] Personal life[edit] Gilders is the younger sister of Fletcher Gilders, a two-time NCAA diving champion at Ohio State
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University Of Houston
The University of Houston
Houston
(UH) is a state research university and the flagship institution of the University of Houston
Houston
System.[6] Founded in 1927, UH is the third-largest university in Texas
Texas
with nearly 44,000 students.[4] Its campus spans 667 acres in southeast Houston, and was known as University of Houston–University Park from 1983 to 1991.[7][8] The Carnegie Foundation classifies UH as a doctoral degree-granting institution with "highest research activity."[9][10][11] The U.S. News & World Report ranks the university No. 192 in its National University Rankings, and No
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100 Metres
The 100 metres, or 100-metre dash, is a sprint race in track and field competitions. The shortest common outdoor running distance, it is one of the most popular and prestigious events in the sport of athletics. It has been contested at the Summer Olympics
Summer Olympics
since 1896 for men and since 1928 for women.Play mediaWomen's 100M Final - 28th Summer Universiade 2015The reigning 100 m Olympic champion is often named "the fastest man in the world". The World Championships 100 metres
100 metres
has been contested since 1983
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Michigan
Michigan
Michigan
(/ˈmɪʃɪɡən/ ( listen)) is a state in the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
and Midwestern regions of the United States. The state's name, Michigan, originates from the ( Ojibwe
Ojibwe
word) mishigamaa, meaning "large water" or "large lake".[3][7] Michigan
Michigan
is the tenth most populous of the 50 United States, with the 11th most extensive total area, and the largest state by total area east of the Mississippi
Mississippi
River.[b] Michigan's capital is Lansing, and its largest city is Detroit. Michigan
Michigan
is the only state to consist of two peninsulas. The Lower Peninsula, to which the name Michigan
Michigan
was originally applied, is often noted to be shaped like a mitten
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United States Olympic Committee
The United States
United States
Olympic Committee (USOC) is the National Olympic Committee for the United States. It was founded in 1895 and headquartered in Colorado
Colorado
Springs, Colorado. In addition, the USOC is one of only four NOCs in the world that also serve as the National Paralympic Committee for their country. The USOC is responsible for supporting, entering and overseeing U.S. teams for the Olympic Games, Paralympic Games, Youth Olympic Games, Pan American Games, and Parapan American Games and serves as the steward of the Olympic and Paralympic Movements in the United States. The Olympic Movement is overseen by the International Olympic Committee
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Amphetamine
Amphetamine[note 1] (contracted from alpha-methylphenethylamine) is a potent central nervous system (CNS) stimulant that is used in the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), narcolepsy, and obesity. Amphetamine
Amphetamine
was discovered in 1887 and exists as two enantiomers:[note 2] levoamphetamine and dextroamphetamine. Amphetamine
Amphetamine
properly refers to a specific chemical, the racemic free base, which is equal parts of the two enantiomers, levoamphetamine and dextroamphetamine, in their pure amine forms. The term is frequently used informally to refer to any combination of the enantiomers, or to either of them alone. Historically, it has been used to treat nasal congestion and depression. Amphetamine
Amphetamine
is also used as an athletic performance enhancer and cognitive enhancer, and recreationally as an aphrodisiac and euphoriant
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National Federation Of State High School Associations
The National Federation of State High School Associations
National Federation of State High School Associations
(NFHS) is the body that writes the rules of competition for most high school sports and activities in the United States. NFHS's headquarters are located in White River State Park
White River State Park
in Indianapolis, Indiana.[2]Contents1 Member and affiliate associations1.1 Member associations 1.2 Affiliate associations2 Players by sport 3 Executive Directors 4 NFHS National High School Hall of Fame 5 See also 6 References, including organizations' official websites 7 Further reading 8 External linksMember and affiliate associations[edit] Over 17,000 high schools belong to associations that are members of the NFHS. Most high schools, whether public or private, belong to their state's high school association; in turn, each state association belongs to the NFHS
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The New York Times
The New York Times
The New York Times
(sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City
New York City
with worldwide influence and readership.[6][7][8] Founded in 1851, the paper has won 122 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper.[9][10] As of September 2016, it had the largest combined print-and-digital circulation of any daily newspaper in the United States.[11] The New York Times is ranked 18th in the world by circulation. The paper is owned by The New York Times
The New York Times
Company, which is publicly traded but primarily controlled by the Ochs-Sulzberger family through a dual-class share structure.[12] It has been owned by the family since 1896; A.G
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