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Delayed Open Access Journal
Delayed open access journals are traditional subscription-based journals that provide free online access upon the expiry of an embargo period following the initial publication date.Contents1 Details 2 Adoption 3 See also 4 ReferencesDetails[edit]This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (October 2015) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)The embargo period before an article is made available for free can vary from a few months to two or more years. In a 2013 study, 77.8% of delayed open access journals analyzed had an embargo of 12 months or less. 85.4% had an embargo period of 24 months or less.[1][2] A journal subscription or an individual article purchase fee would be required to access the materials before this embargo period ends
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Preprint
In academic publishing, a preprint is a version of a scholarly or scientific paper that precedes publication in a peer-reviewed scholarly or scientific journal
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Journal Of The Physical Society Of Japan
Physical may refer to: Physical body, the physical structure of an organismHuman body, the physical structure of a human Physical abuse, abuse involving contact intended to cause feelings of intimidation, injury, or other physical suffering or bodily harm Physical body, in physics, psychology, philosophy, mysticism and religion
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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Copyright Transfer Agreement
A copyright transfer agreement is a legal document containing provisions for the conveyance of full or partial copyright from the rights owner to another party
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Open Knowledge
Open knowledge is knowledge that one is free to use, reuse, and redistribute without legal, social or technological restriction.[1] Open knowledge is a set of principles and methodologies related to the production and distribution of how knowledge works in an open manner. Knowledge
Knowledge
is interpreted broadly to include data, content and general information. The concept is related to open source and the Open Knowledge Definition is directly derived from the Open Source Definition
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Academic Journal
An academic or scholarly journal is a periodical publication in which scholarship relating to a particular academic discipline is published. Academic
Academic
journals serve as permanent and transparent forums for the presentation, scrutiny and discussion of research. They are usually peer-reviewed or refereed.[1] Content typically takes the form of articles presenting original research, review articles, and book reviews. The purpose of an academic journal, according to the first editor of the world's oldest academic journal Henry Oldenburg, is to give researchers a venue to "impart their knowledge to one another, and contribute what they can to the Grand design of improving natural knowledge, and perfecting all Philosophical Arts, and Sciences."[2] The term academic journal applies to scholarly publications in all fields; this article discusses the aspects common to all academic field journals
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Manuscript (publishing)
"Manuscript" is a broad concept in publishing, that can refer to one or both of the following:the formatting of a short story manuscript, an accepted manuscript (by its merit, not its format), not yet in a final format (but reviewed), published with non-final-format in advance, as preprint.A manuscript is the work that an author submits to a publisher, editor, or producer for publication
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Scientific Journal
In academic publishing, a scientific journal is a periodical publication intended to further the progress of science, usually by reporting new research. Articles in scientific journals are mostly written by active scientists such as students, researchers and professors instead of professional journalists. There are thousands of scientific journals in publication, and many more have been published at various points in the past (see list of scientific journals). Most journals are highly specialized, although some of the oldest journals such as Nature publish articles and scientific papers across a wide range of scientific fields. Scientific journals contain articles that have been peer reviewed, in an attempt to ensure that articles meet the journal's standards of quality, and scientific validity. Although scientific journals are superficially similar to professional magazines, they are actually quite different
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Scholarly Publishing And Academic Resources Coalition
Publishing
Publishing
is the dissemination of literature, music, or information—the activity of making information available to the general public. In some cases, authors may be their own publishers, meaning originators and developers of content also provide media to deliver and display the content for the same. Also, the word publisher can refer to the individual who leads a publishing company or an imprint or to a person who owns/heads a magazine. Traditionally, the term refers to the distribution of printed works such as books (the "book trade") and newspapers
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Gratis Versus Libre
The English adjective free is commonly used in one of two meanings: "for free" (gratis) and "with little or no restriction" (libre). This ambiguity of free can cause issues where the distinction is important, as it often is in dealing with laws concerning the use of information, such as copyright and patents. The terms gratis and libre may be used to categorise intellectual property, particularly computer programs, according to the licenses and legal restrictions that cover them, in the free software and open source communities, as well as the broader free culture movement
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Paywall
A paywall is a method of restricting access to Internet content via a paid subscription.[1][2] Beginning in the mid-2010s, newspapers started implementing paywalls on their websites as a way to increase revenue after years of decline in paid print readership and advertising revenue.[3] In academics, research papers are often subject to a paywall and are available via academic libraries that subscribe.[4][5] Paywalls have also been used as a way of increasing the number of print subscribers; for example, some newspapers offer access to online content plus delivery of a Sunday print edition at a lower price than online access alone.[6] Newspaper websites such as that of The Boston Globe and The New York Times
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Sci-hub
sci-hub.hk sci-hub.tw Old: sci-hub.org, sci-hub.cc, sci-hub.ac, sci-hub.io, sci-hub.la, sci-hub.mn, sci-hub.name, sci-hub.tv, sci-hub.bz, sci-hub.biz, scihub22266oqcxt.onionCommercial NoLaunched 16 April 2011; 6 years ago (2011-04-16)[1]Current status ActiveIP address 80.82.77.83 80.82.77.84Part of a series on File
File
sharingTechnologiesPeer to peer
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Impact Factor
The impact factor (IF) or journal impact factor (JIF) of an academic journal is a measure reflecting the yearly average number of citations to recent articles published in that journal. It is frequently used as a proxy for the relative importance of a journal within its field; journals with higher impact factors are often deemed to be more important than those with lower ones. The impact factor was devised by Eugene Garfield, the founder of the Institute for Scientific Information
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Creative Commons
Creative Commons
Commons
(CC) is an American non-profit organization devoted to expanding the range of creative works available for others to build upon legally and to share.[2] The organization has released several copyright-licenses known as Creative Commons
Commons
licenses free of charge to the public. These licenses allow creators to communicate which rights they reserve, and which rights they waive for the benefit of recipients or other creators. An easy-to-understand one-page explanation of rights, with associated visual symbols, explains the specifics of each Creative Commons
Commons
license. Creative Commons
Commons
licenses do not replace copyright, but are based upon it
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Research Library
A research library is a library which contains an in-depth collection of material on one or several subjects (Young, 1983; p.188). A research library will generally include primary sources as well as secondary sources. Large university libraries are considered research libraries, and often contain many specialized branch research libraries. Research libraries can be either reference libraries, which do not lend their holdings, or lending libraries, which do lend all or some of their holdings
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