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Delage
Delage
Delage
was a French luxury automobile and racecar company founded in 1905 by Louis Delage
Louis Delage
in Levallois-Perret
Levallois-Perret
near Paris; it was acquired by Delahaye
Delahaye
in 1935 and ceased operation in 1953.Contents1 Early history 2 Competition 3 The D6 and the D8: The Classic Era 4 Racing aero-engines 5 After the Second World War 6 Models 7 Production volumes 8 Sources and further reading 9 External linksEarly history[edit] The company was founded in 1905 by Louis Delage, who borrowed Fr 35,000, giving up a salary of Fr 600 a month to do so.[1] Its first location was on the Rue Cormeilles in Levallois-Perret
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Donington Park
Donington Park
Park
is a motorsport circuit located near Castle Donington in Leicestershire, England. The circuit business is now owned by Jonathan Palmer's MotorSport Vision organisation, and the surrounding Donington Park
Park
Estate is currently under lease by MotorSport Vision until 2038.[1] Originally part of the Donington Hall
Donington Hall
estate, it was created as a racing circuit during the period between the First and Second World Wars when the German Silver Arrows
Silver Arrows
were battling for the European Championship. Used as a military vehicle storage depot during World War II, it fell into disrepair until bought by local construction entrepreneur Tom Wheatcroft
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Rudge-Whitworth
Rudge Whitworth Cycles was a British bicycle, bicycle saddle,[1] motorcycle and sports car wheel manufacturer that resulted from the merger of two bicycle manufacturers in 1894, Whitworth Cycle Co of Birmingham, founded by Charles Henry Pugh (1840–1901) and his two sons Charles Vernon and John,[2] and Rudge Cycle Co of Coventry
Coventry
(which descended from a bicycle company founded by Daniel Rudge
Daniel Rudge
of Wolverhampton). Rudge motorcycles were produced from 1911 to 1946. The firm was known for its innovations in engine and transmission design, and its racing successes
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Overhead Valve
An overhead valve engine (OHV engine) is an engine in which the valves are placed in the cylinder head. This was an improvement over the older flathead engine, where the valves were placed in the cylinder block next to the piston. Overhead camshaft
Overhead camshaft
(OHC) engines, while still overhead valve by definition, are usually categorized apart from other OHV engines
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Magneto Ignition
An ignition magneto, or high tension magneto, is a magneto that provides current for the ignition system of a spark-ignition engine, such as a petrol engine. It produces pulses of high voltage for the spark plugs. The older term tension means voltage.[1] The use of ignition magnetos is now confined mainly to engines where there is no other available electrical supply, for example in lawnmowers and chainsaws. It is also widely used in aviation piston engines even though an electrical supply is usually available
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Thermosyphon
Thermosiphon
Thermosiphon
(or thermosyphon) is a method of passive heat exchange, based on natural convection, which circulates a fluid without the necessity of a mechanical pump. Thermosiphoning is used for circulation of liquids and volatile gases in heating and cooling applications such as heat pumps, water heaters, boilers and furnaces. Thermosiphoning also occurs across air temperature gradients such as those utilized in a wood fire chimney or solar chimney. This circulation can either be open-loop, as when the substance in a holding tank is passed in one direction via a heated transfer tube mounted at the bottom of the tank to a distribution point—even one mounted above the originating tank—or it can be a vertical closed-loop circuit with return to the original container
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Zenith Motorcycles
Zenith Motorcycles
Zenith Motorcycles
was a British motorcycle and automobile manufacturer established in Finsbury Park, London
Finsbury Park, London
in 1903,[1] by W.G. Bowers.[2] Automobile manufacture only lasted from 1905–1906. The first Zenith motorcycle was the 'BiCar' of 1903, based on Tooley's Bi-Car design, which was purchased by Zenith for its own production. The BiCar was a unique design with hub-center steering and a low-slung chassis with the engine (from Fafnir
Fafnir
in Germany) centrally fixed. Fred ('Freddie') W. Barnes was hired as chief engineer in 1905, and patented the "Gradua" variable-ratio belt drive transmission that year
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Hillclimbing
Hillclimbing
Hillclimbing
(also known as hill climbing, speed hillclimbing or speed hill climbing) is a branch of motorsport in which drivers compete against the clock to complete an uphill course. It is one of the oldest forms of motorsport, since the first known hillclimb at La Turbie
La Turbie
near Nice, France took place as long ago as 31 January 1897. The hillclimb held at Shelsley Walsh, in Worcestershire, England is the world's oldest continuously staged motorsport event still staged on its original course, having been first run in 1905.[1] An alternative style of hillclimbing is done with offroad motorcycles going straight up extremely steep hills, with the victor being the motorcycle which can climb the highest, or make it to the top the fastest. The motorsport has a long tradition in the USA and has been popular in France and Austria since the 1980s
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Rolls-Royce Limited
Rolls-Royce Limited
Rolls-Royce Limited
owned a British luxury car and aero engine manufacturing business founded in 1904 by Charles Stewart Rolls
Charles Stewart Rolls
and Frederick Henry Royce. Rolls-Royce Limited
Rolls-Royce Limited
was incorporated on 15 March 1906 as a vehicle for their ownership of their Rolls-Royce business. Their business quickly developed a reputation for superior engineering quality and for manufacturing the "best car in the world", building on F H Royce's existing standing
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Kelsch
Kelsch is a surname. Notable people with the surname include: Mose Kelsch (1897–1935), American football player Walter Kelsch (born 1955), German football playerThis page lists people with the surname Kelsch
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Six-cylinder Engine
For multiple-cylinder steam engines, see Compound steam engine
Compound steam engine
and Triple-expansion steam engineA cutaway illustration of a V6, 24-valve, DOHC
DOHC
engine, an example of a Vee-configured six-cylinder engine.A flat-twin engine.A 1905 Wolseley straight-12 engine.An Fiat AS.6
Fiat AS.6
engine for a Macchi-Castoldi M.C.72 racing seaplane. While it is often considered a "V24 engine", it is actually two V12 engines bolted together in tandem, driving separate crankshafts.A multi-cylinder engine is a reciprocating internal combustion engine with multiple cylinders. It can be either a 2-stroke or 4-stroke engine, and can be either Diesel or spark-ignition. The cylinders and the crankshaft which is driven by and co-ordinates the motion of the pistons can be configured in a wide variety of ways
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Transmission (mechanics)
A transmission is a machine in a power transmission system, which provides controlled application of the power. Often the term transmission refers simply to the gearbox that uses gears and gear trains to provide speed and torque conversions from a rotating power source to another device.[1][2] In British English, the term transmission refers to the whole drivetrain, including clutch, gearbox, prop shaft (for rear-wheel drive), differential, and final drive shafts. In American English, however, the term refers more specifically to the gearbox alone, and detailed usage differs.[note 1] The most common use is in motor vehicles, where the transmission adapts the output of the internal combustion engine to the drive wheels. Such engines need to operate at a relatively high rotational speed, which is inappropriate for starting, stopping, and slower travel. The transmission reduces the higher engine speed to the slower wheel speed, increasing torque in the process
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Paul Bablot
Paul Bablot
Paul Bablot
(20 November 1873 Boulogne-sur-Seine
Boulogne-sur-Seine
– 23 December 1932 Marseille) was a French racecar driver. He also owned an early French-built Wright-model airplane.[1] He later became a track builder and designed the Circuit of Miramas which held the French Grand Prix
French Grand Prix
in 1926.[2] See also[edit]1926 Grand Prix season 1919 Indianapolis 500 1906 Targa FlorioReferences[edit]^ Fred T. Jane, ed., All the World's Airships (London: Sampson Low, Marsden & Co., 1910), 380. ^ http://www.oldracingcars.com/driver/Paul_BablotThis Formula One
Formula One
biographical article is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eThis biographical article related to French auto racing is a stub
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1912 French Grand Prix
The 1912 French Grand Prix was a Grand Prix motor race held at Dieppe on 25–26 June 1912.Georges Boillot celebrating his win at the 1912 French Grand PrixThe Race[edit] The race was run over two days with the drivers completing ten laps on each day and their times being aggregated to produce the winner (similar to a modern rally race). Coupe de l'Auto cars competed alongside Grand Prix cars. The coupe cars were limited to 3 litre engines. The only restriction on the Grand Prix cars was a minimum width of 1750 millimetres.[1] Riding mechanic Jean Bassignano was killed in a lap 3 crash when his driver Léon Collinet put a wheel off and flipped. 47 cars started the race at 30 second intervals, with Victor Rigal's Sunbeam the first to start. Victor Hemery, driving a Lorraine-Dietrich held the lead after the first lap. David Bruce-Brown's Fiat subsequently took the lead and retained it overnight, more than two minutes ahead of Georges Boillot's Peugeot
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Mercedes (car)
Mercedes was a brand of the Daimler-Motoren-Gesellschaft
Daimler-Motoren-Gesellschaft
(DMG). DMG began to develop in 1900, after the death of its co-founder, Gottlieb Daimler. Although the name was not lodged as a trade name until 23 June 1902 and not registered legally until 26 September, the brand name eventually would be applied to an automobile model built by Wilhelm Maybach
Wilhelm Maybach
to specifications by Emil Jellinek
Emil Jellinek
that was delivered to him on 22 December 1900. By Jellinek's contract, the new model contained a newly designed engine designated "Daimler-Mercedes". This engine name is the first instance of the use of the name, Mercedes, by DMG
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Camshaft
A camshaft is a shaft to which a cam is fastened or of which a cam forms an integral part.[1]Contents1 History 2 Uses2.1 Automotive2.1.1 Materials 2.1.2 Timing 2.1.3 Duration 2.1.4 Lift 2.1.5 Position 2.1.6 Number of camshafts 2.1.7 Maintenance 2.1.8 Alternatives 2.1.9 Ignition systems2.2 Electrical3 Gallery 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The camshaft was first described in Turkey
Turkey
(Diyarbakır) by Al-Jazari in 1206
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